Singularity & Psychology of AI
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Welcome, Robot Overlords. Please Don't Fire Us?

Welcome, Robot Overlords. Please Don't Fire Us? | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
Smart machines probably won't kill us all—but they'll definitely take our jobs, and sooner than you think. (Welcome, Robot Overlords. Please Don't Fire Us?
Sean Thoennes's insight:

Displacement or inattentive blindness?

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Rescooped by Sean Thoennes from Internet of Things - Technology focus
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Should Elderly Drivers Be The Autonomous Car Early Adopters?

Should Elderly Drivers Be The Autonomous Car Early Adopters? | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
Some automakers tease concept cars with autonomous-driving modes, lounge-style interiors, and augmented-reality windshields and windows, while others tout automatic cruise control, lane-keep systems, and automated parking features as technologies that are the gateway to autonomous driving. But the...

Via Karolina Maria Chachulska, Richard Platt
Sean Thoennes's insight:

Driverless cars should be made available first to those least able to access our roads independently.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:57 PM

Some automakers tease concept cars with autonomous-driving modes, lounge-style interiors, and augmented-reality windshields and windows, while others tout automatic cruise control, lane-keep systems, and automated parking features as technologies that are the gateway to autonomous driving.  But the reality is that autonomous driving isn’t as little as five or even ten years off, on a widespread basis, and that there are a lot of decidedly less glamorous pieces of technology required to make autonomous driving...well, autonomous.   Toyota Motor Corporation last week announced a $50 million investment aimed at autonomous-vehicle research—including advanced robotics and artificial intelligence—to a specific goal of reducing road injuries and fatalities.  And work with older drivers and those who have impairments might be one of the first jumping points for such “self-driving” technologies.

Jukka Riivari's curator insight, September 16, 2015 3:06 AM

If you lose your driving lisence what are your options?

Sieg Holle's curator insight, September 16, 2015 11:55 AM

By choice not force ?

 

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6 reasons why the IoT will exceed its already soaring Hype

6 reasons why the IoT will exceed its already soaring Hype | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
According to McKinsey, there are six reasons we may be underhyping the Internet of Things. Rather than focusing on verticals and industries (the typical way that potential economic value is computed), McKinsey takes a deeper look at the changes taking place in nine different physical “settings” where the Internet of Things will be deployed — home, retail, office, factories, work sites (mining, oil and gas, construction), vehicles, human (health and wellness), outside (logistics and navigation) and cities. Of that $11 trillion in economic value, four of the nine settings top out at more than $1 trillion in projected economic value — factories ($3.7 trillion), cities ($1.7 trillion), health and fitness ($1.6 trillion) and retail ($1.2 trillion). [...] instead of focusing on, say, the automotive industry, McKinsey spreads the benefits of the Internet of Things for automobiles over two settings — “vehicles” and “cities.” If you think the Internet of Things is just about smart homes and fitness devices, think again — McKinsey says the B2B market opportunity could be more than two times the size of the B2C opportunity. According to McKinsey, about 40 percent of the total economic value of the Internet of Things is driven by the ability of all physical devices to talk to each other via computers — what McKinsey refers to as “interoperability.” At same time, isn’t there something bleak about a future in which sensors are hooked up to every object, every setting is predictable and optimized, and pure data guide every decision rather than the human heart?

Via Richard Platt
Sean Thoennes's insight:

McKinsey is at the top of the traditional data-gathering game in the traditional business world. Here, they tell us the data suggests the Internet of Things industry insiders are actually being *conservative* when it comes to their products, despite what appears to be hype. #Hypesters Will we move from IoT to implanted technologies as readily as we moved from glasses to contacts to Lasik? #NeoAnthropoGenicPsychology #NAGPsych

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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:32 PM

According to McKinsey's latest report there are 6 very good reasons why we are under-hyping the IoT and it's potential.

1. We’re only using 1% of all data:  What McKinsey found in its analysis of more than 150 Internet of Things use cases was that we’re not taking advantage of all the data that sensors and RFID tags are cranking out 24/7. In some cases, we may be using only 1 percent of all the data out there. And even then, we’re only using the data for simple things such as anomaly detection and control systems — we’re not taking advantage of the other 99% for tasks such as optimization and prediction. A typical offshore oil rig, for example, may have 30,000 sensors hooked up to it, but oil companies are only using a small fraction of this data for future decision-making.

2. We’re not getting the big picture by focusing only on industries:

Rather than focusing on verticals and industries (the typical way that potential economic value is computed), McKinsey takes a deeper look at the changes taking place in nine different physical “settings” where the Internet of Things will be deployed — home, retail, office, factories, work sites (mining, oil and gas, construction), vehicles, human (health and wellness), outside (logistics and navigation) and cities. Of that $11 trillion in economic value, four of the nine settings top out at more than $1 trillion in projected economic value — factories ($3.7 trillion), cities ($1.7 trillion), health and fitness ($1.6 trillion) and retail ($1.2 trillion). Thus, instead of focusing on, say, the automotive industry, McKinsey spreads the benefits of the Internet of Things for automobiles over two settings — “vehicles” and “cities.” In the case of vehicles, sensors are a natural fit for maintenance (e.g., sensors tell you when something’s not working on your car). In cities, these sensors can help with issues such as traffic congestion.

3. We’re forgetting about the B2B opportunity:  If you think the Internet of Things is just about smart homes and fitness devices, think again — McKinsey says the B2B market opportunity could be more than two times the size of the B2C opportunity. Think of an oil work site. You have machinery (oil rigs), mobile equipment (trucks), consumables (barrels of oil), employees, processing plants and transportation networks for taking oil out of the work site. If all those elements are talking to each via the Internet, you can optimize the work site. Oil rigs can let employees know if something’s broken, trucks can arrive on time to pick up the barrels of oil, and all that oil can be processed and shipped on time and on schedule.

4. We’re not seeing that “interoperability” could be the new “synergy”:  According to McKinsey, about 40 percent of the total economic value of the Internet of Things is driven by the ability of all physical devices to talk to each other via computers — what McKinsey refers to as “interoperability.” You can think of “interoperability” as a new form of synergy — a way to increase the whole without increasing the sum of the parts. One example of interoperability is the ability of your fitness wearable to talk with your hospital or health care provider. With interoperability in health, the Internet of Things may be able to cut the cost of treating chronic disease by 50 percent.

5. We’re underestimating the impact on developing economies: 

In terms of economic impact, there will be a 60:40 split between economic gains for developed economies and developing economies. Some of the greatest gains will be in developing nations.In some cases, developing nations will be able to leapfrog the achievements in developed nations because they don’t have to worry about retrofitting equipment or infrastructure with sensors and actuators.

6. We’re forgetting about the new business models that will be created:  It’s not just that the Internet of Things will lead to efficiencies and cost savings — but that it will lead to new ways of doing business. As McKinsey points out, we will likely see the rise of new business models that correspond with the way we are monitoring and evaluating data in real-time. The line will blur between technology companies and non-technology companies.

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The Basics Of Neuromarketing

The Basics Of Neuromarketing | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
A Panda and a Penguin walk into a bar--and send your Google search ranking plummeting a few hundred places.If you didn’t laugh at the above, that’s because it’s not really a joke.

Via Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Sean Thoennes's insight:

Pulling the threads of global togetherness tighter through speed-of-light marketing.

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Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, January 26, 2013 3:43 PM

Neuroleadership - brain science isn't just for marketing

Kimberlee Comfort's curator insight, January 26, 2013 9:31 PM

Reminds me of the new resarch domain NeuroEducation and it's interdisciplinary effortst to figure out how it is exactly that we learn, and how we can be better tearchers.

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MIT Artificial Intelligence Program Has IQ Of 4-Year-Old Child - Tech Times

MIT Artificial Intelligence Program Has IQ Of 4-Year-Old Child - Tech Times | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
Massachusetts Institute of Technology's artificial intelligence program has a machine called the ConceptNet. Researchers from the University of Illinois put it to the test and found its IQ is the same as a 4-year-old's.
Sean Thoennes's insight:

#NeoAnthropoGenicPsychology #NAGPsych

How will it feel? Erikson's initiative vs. guilt? Does its IQ correspond to a 4-year-old's EQ?

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amelius comments on “What Can AI Get from Neuroscience? (2007) [pdf]“ | Exploding Ads

amelius comments on “What Can AI Get from Neuroscience? (2007) [pdf]“ | Exploding Ads | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
amelius comments on "What Can AI Get from Neuroscience? (2007) [pdf]" - http://t.co/ze7fx5n6XW - By amelius
How about the ethical ...
Sean Thoennes's insight:

#NeoAnthropoGenicPsychology #NAGPsych

Some literature is insightful and becomes visible enough to merit a review years on. This is not only an interesting perspective, but holds relevance 8 years on.

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Flickr: 20 Under 20

Flickr: 20 Under 20 | Singularity & Psychology of AI | Scoop.it
Flickr is almost certainly the best online photo management and sharing application in the world. Show off your favorite photos and videos to the world, securely and privately show content to your friends and family, or blog the photos and videos you take with a cameraphone.

Via Jerri Lynn Hogg
Sean Thoennes's insight:

When asked how to get started in the world of media production, the answer is a mirror away. Produce thyself, storyteller. The tools are ubiquitous and the narrative within. Sew it together clearly and deliver it in the cheapest way, and you are a producer.

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Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, September 20, 2014 10:16 AM

Amazingly beautiful and provocative.  Am particularly drawn to the use of contrast.