Simulation
Follow
Find
16 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tom Riecken
Scoop.it!

Jamie Hyneman Tests the Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Goggles

We invite Jamie to try out the Oculus Rift headset at the Tested office, and then have a conversation with him about how he would use these virtual reality g...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Riecken
Scoop.it!

Thrive Microbe Stage Concept Animation

Thrive website: http://revolutionarygamesstudio.com/ After the success of my cell editor concept animation, I decided to try my hand at creating one for the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Riecken
Scoop.it!

Quantum Computers, Artificial Intelligence and the Singularity

1:45-1:47 Artificial Intelligence. The new approaches to AI seem to sensible and testable in a short time 1:49-1:51 AI. Not likely the android systems, but initially systems that do remarkable things beyond human capability.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tom Riecken from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

IBM devises software for its experimental brain-like chips | NetworkWorld.com

IBM devises software for its experimental brain-like chips | NetworkWorld.com | Simulation | Scoop.it

Following up on work commissioned by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), IBM has developed a programming paradigm, and associated simulator and basic software library, for its experimental SyNAPSE processor.

 

The work suggests the processors could be used for extremely low-power yet computationally powerful sensor systems.

 

"Our end goal is to create a brain in a box," said Dharmendra Modha, and IBM Research senior manager who is the principal investigator for the project. With this technology, systems could one day be built that would "mimic the brain's ability for perception, action and cognition," he said.

 

The work is a continuation of a DARPA project to design a system that replicates the way a human processes information.

 

DARPA's original goal for the Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) project was to design computational devices comprised of billions of tiny processor cores packed into the volume of a two-liter bottle that used less energy than a light bulb.

 

At The International Joint Conference on Neural Networks this week in Dallas, IBM is demonstrating the third phase of the project, which thus far DARPA has funded with approximately US$53 million. IBM is working with Cornell University and iniLabs, and has collaborated with six other universities and a number of government supercomputing facilities as well.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Riecken
Scoop.it!

Simpians Sneak Peek

Simpians is a MMO persistent browser-based hunter gatherer simulation fantasy strategy game with the objective to survive, adapt, discover, and evolve! http:...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Riecken
Scoop.it!

ROBLOX Procedural City Generation Plugin

http://blog.roblox.com/2012/07/procedurally-generating-a-zombie-city/ (I liked a @YouTube video http://t.co/u8Z25tDLiT ROBLOX Procedural City Generation Plugin)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tom Riecken from Game Mod Culture
Scoop.it!

The Difficulties of an Infinite Video Game World

The Difficulties of an Infinite Video Game World | Simulation | Scoop.it

Procedural Generation is definitely in vogue, and I personally have believed that it is the way forward in video gaming for many years now. Using procedural generation in games is nothing new of course, as fans of games such as Elite or The Sentinel will know that we’ve been seeing it in games for a good 25 years.

Older titles made good use of it due to the memory constraints of the hardware of the time. It was simply more efficient to have generated levels rather than hand crafted ones, but that is no excuse for games not to make better use of it now that we have better specced hardware.

Fans of the RPG genre will no doubt remember The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall, which had one of the largest in-game worlds ever seen, and still to this day tramples almost every RPG made in terms of world size. I recall reading somewhere that the in-game world of Daggerfall was equal to twice the landmass of the British Isles. ...


Via Cameron Schwach
more...
No comment yet.