Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff
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Rescooped by Louise Botha from SimulationWeek
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Using Mask Ed to train staff to improve patient experience

Using Mask Ed to train staff to improve patient experience | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it

For Simulation Week I'd like to highlight the training I have been developing for all staff regarding partnering with consumers to improve patient experience.

 

The National Safety and Quality Health Standards Standard 2, Partnering with Consumers requires that clinical leaders, senior managers and the workforce access training on patient centred care.

 

Our team devised education sessions that focus patient centred care principles and includes:

What matters to our patients?How an improved patient experience has benefits to patient, family staff and the organisationHow we make a differenceCommunications in challenging situations.

 

Our group elected to include simulated learning into the session and chose an innovative simulation technique pioneered by Professor K. Reid Searle and known as Mask Ed (TM) KRS Simulation.


Via Simulation Australasia
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Scooped by Louise Botha
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Simulation in clinical teaching and learning | Medical Journal of Australia

Simulation in clinical teaching and learning | Medical Journal of Australia | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it
Louise Botha's insight:

Great Article about Simulation in Australia.

 We are really lucky to have access to the great resources and training oppurtunities via ACT Region ICTN- SLE

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Rescooped by Louise Botha from Social Media and Healthcare
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Patient Engagement in Healthcare: Stewards of the Brand Promise

Patient Engagement in Healthcare: Stewards of the Brand Promise | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it
When provided the right tools, healthcare workers can extend the brand promise by connecting with patients all along the continuum of care.

 

Traditionally, marketing departments have been excellent at communicating to consumers the benefits and emotional connections between organizational brands and their respective customers. They have used powerful statements to share endearing imagery. Without a doubt, the degree of effectiveness has been measured and adjusted with a great deal of resources and investment, still continuing today.

 

 The Importance of Patient Engagement

Physical customer experiences have always been at the heart of the brand…and even though there are wonderful messages from marketers and the amazing capabilities that technology platforms provide, how people are treated by the actual workforce can make or break a brand.

 

Providing Caregivers with the Right Tools

Today, there are more tools to allow operational workers to improve upon the patient’s experience, whether it’s the barista who can offer an instant discount or the flight attendant who can upgrade your seat to first class. It’s at the moment of patient engagement that brands are made or degraded.

 scooped from: http://gold-mobile.com/mobility/patient-engagement-in-healthcare/
Via nrip
Louise Botha's insight:

Do we have these tools?

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Rescooped by Louise Botha from Digital Health
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Patients, families find comfort and help by sharing stories via social media

Patients, families find comfort and help by sharing stories via social media | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it

Panelists at Mayo-hosted Health Care Social Media Summit discuss how social media has helped them, their families and their peers.

 

It was hard to miss one recurring theme at the Health Care Social Media Summit, which began Wednesday, Oct. 23, in Rochester and wraps up today: The patient experience is at the center of health care social media efforts. And if it isn't, it should be.


Via Alex Butler
Louise Botha's insight:

If organisations commit to social media they can certainly gain valuable information from patients and families and identify gaps within current processes

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Rescooped by Louise Botha from Simulated Learning Environments
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CQUniversity Australia - MASK-ED

CQUniversity Australia - MASK-ED | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it

Via Nicole Jones de Rooy
Louise Botha's insight:

Try it-Amazing new way to get the message across

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Nicole Jones de Rooy's curator insight, July 10, 2013 3:58 AM

Kerry has developed this MASKED education modality with the idea that the person behind the mask is the Educator.  See her character Cryil on this page.

 

Rescooped by Louise Botha from Sim-Supported Decisions & Discoveries
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Using Standardized Patients in Healthcare Education


Via Nicole Jones de Rooy
Louise Botha's insight:

Certainly not limited to Medical Students. Simulated patients can play a vital role in assisting all our staff with improving the patient experience

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We are ALL the Patient Experience. - YouTube

Created for The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2014. Directed by Jason Armour Music by Ray Sharp
Louise Botha's insight:

Great remake with the patient at the centre of the experience!

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Taking simulation training to the next level - Australian Ageing Agenda

Taking simulation training to the next level - Australian Ageing Agenda | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it
A new aged care training facility in Western Sydney is going the extra mile when it comes to imitating the workplace, offering a clever state-of-the-art simulation-style program to more than 200 students each year.
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Rescooped by Louise Botha from Empathy and Compassion
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Adding Empathy to Medical School Requirements | Center for Advancing Health

Adding Empathy to Medical School Requirements | Center for Advancing Health | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it

Is it possible for a young medical student to understand a patient's experience? Or the day-to-day life of a person with a chronic illness? In 'Healthy Privilege' – When You Just Can't Imagine Being Sick, Carolyn Thomas observes that "what I've learned since my heart attack is that, until you or somebody you care about are personally affected by a life-altering diagnosis, it's almost impossible to really get what being sick every day actually means. Such is the bliss – and the ignorance – of healthy privilege."

 

After experiencing a rare eye infection that resulted in her "worst  pain ever," first-year medical student Natalie Wilcox shared that "as doctors, it is our job not only to provide care, but to comfort, and to do this we must acknowledge our patients' feelings." While noting that every person experiences pain differently, Wilcox adds, "By recalling my own pain, I bring forth real empathy rooted in shared experience."


Via Edwin Rutsch
Louise Botha's insight:

Most of us will at some time be on the receiving end of hospital care. Surely it does not take that experience for us to show empathy for our patients

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Sophia Nguyen's curator insight, July 29, 2015 5:28 AM

This is something that is important to learn because not only do you have to talk to the patient, you have to be able to understand and get a sense of what they are feeling and where they are coming from. I think it's better to have a doctor who can empathize than one who is just there to get the job done.

Rescooped by Louise Botha from Cultural Trendz
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Simulations can reach Gen Y when other methods can’t | L&D

Simulations can reach Gen Y when other methods can’t | L&D | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it

Training needs, tools and solutions are constantly evolving. As a health care executive at Raytheon Professional Services, Bryan Chance has been watching these trends evolve in his industry for years. Chance and his colleagues at Raytheon Professional Services have found that simulation-based training can help employers adapt their training offerings to accommodate their new employees’ learning preferences. I interviewed him to find out what Gen Y thinks of simulation-based training and how it’s revamping corporate learning systems.

What kind of training is Gen Y looking for?

Chance: Often, Gen Y employees will say they don’t need training. What they really mean is that they’re not interested in traditional classroom training. They’re far more likely to welcome experiential, technology-based training that aligns with the mass array of media they engage with on a daily basis. These multi-modal training solutions can tap into Gen Y’s experience with everything from video games to social media, making the training experience significantly more engaging and impactful than a traditional classroom-based, instructor-led, PowerPoint-based training.

Gen Y can also benefit from training initiatives that help identify competency gaps. Simulation-based training is a great first step in opening learners’ eyes to the fact that their skill levels may not necessarily match their knowledge bases. After many individuals’ first encounters with this form of training, they are often surprised by how much they don’t know. Having memorized their textbooks does not necessarily mean they are capable of applying their education in high-pressure environments and high-consequence situations.

I often work with recent nursing and therapy graduates who have extensive classroom experience, but don’t yet possess the hands-on skills needed to effectively and safely interact with patients. Simulation-based training gives students the ability to gain a better understanding of their surroundings and improve their skills in a risk-free environment.

How else is simulation-based training different from more traditional methods?

Chance: Simulation-based training creates safe practice environments, where mistakes are learning opportunities rather than potential disasters. A common mantra in health care is “see one, do one, teach one,” implying that once you have seen a doctor or a nurse perform a procedure and performed one yourself, you are qualified to teach the next batch of learners. It’s a clever and memorable saying. Simulation training can help improve on this knowledge transfer process by creating additional opportunities to “see and do” critical skills.

Can Gen Y participate in simulation training on the go?

Chance: Many simulation solutions are mobile friendly. Gen Y is an on-demand information generation, and the fact that simulation-based training can be made available on multiple platforms makes it possible for them to access information and training programs how they want to, when they want to, and in a form that best fits their learning style.

For the most part, Gen Yers prefer consuming information in small bites. The nature of simulation-based training allows learners to segment the training curricula into manageable pieces, so they don’t have to drink from the proverbial fire hose.

Many of today’s health care simulation-based training courses still involve a classroom of learners reviewing training materials or standing around a mannequin. Simulation-based training which leverages games and avatars provides equivalent (if not significantly better) experiential learning that can be completed in an environment where the learner feels most comfortable, and at his or her preferred pace.

Of course, we don’t except to see team environments completely replaced with on-demand, virtual and mobile solutions. At Raytheon Professional Services, we would like to see is a better blend of learning that incorporates new tools that help to better reach this generation of learners. We’re not seeking to replace training mannequins; rather, we want to see training programs incorporate multiple tools in situations where each learning tool proves to be most effective. For example, inserting an IV or assisting with a birth are difficult procedures to practice on an iPad, but pre-work completed via interactive game could increase the efficiency and effectiveness of in-classroom training. A good blend of training solutions will help balance cost, convenience and effectiveness of training programs.

So Gen Y’s happy, but what about older workers? How can learning leaders make sure all generations are engaged in simulation training?

Chance: Older workers could experience a steeper learning curve dependent upon their knowledge and comfort level with technology. However, when it comes to adopting new training initiatives such as simulation-based training, I believe they will embrace it upon seeing how effective it can be.

What’s the future of simulation training?

Chance: The future of any technology depends on how the price of the technology compresses, and the same is true for simulation-based training.

At Raytheon Professional Services, we believe that in the future, simulation-based training programs will be a combination of more traditional learning methods and advanced gaming technologies.

We recently started working with a prominent teaching hospital that discovered medication errors were a leading cause of death and complications among its patients. Initially, we wondered if this was a knowledge issue – did doctors and nurses not understand how and when to deliver medications? Were administration issues at the root of the problem? Upon further inspection, we came to a very different conclusion. The nurses understood what they were supposed to do, but other factors got in the way of effectively completing the task at hand. Mistakes were made in scenarios where a visitor was asking questions, a doctor was yelling down the hall, an alert was sounding somewhere in the room, etc. The majority of these errors were performed by Gen Y/new nursing grads. We developed a simulation-based training game that walks players through the medication administration process, complete with distractions every five to 10 minutes, simulating a realistic environment. We then tested knowledge retention. The program is in beta right now and we’re already seeing some positive results.

Our goal is to leverage our knowledge base as learning experts to identify the root cause of glitches and complications and determine how we can use technology to overcome those obstacles in the most efficient and effective way possible. Moving forward, simulation-based training will be an increasingly important tool in the training industry’s arsenal as it continues to develop innovative solutions to meet training needs.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Louise Botha's insight:

Simulation refers not just to highly technological mannequins, consider high fidelity in another light-Mask ed and simulated patients can allow learners to interact in a different manner.

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Rescooped by Louise Botha from Office Environments Of The Future
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Hospital Impact - Improve patient experience by reflecting on your own

Hospital Impact - Improve patient experience by reflecting on your own | Improving the Patient Experience through Education and Training of Staff | Scoop.it
what will it take for hospitals to be the best run organizations on the face of the planet?

Via Color-Art
Louise Botha's insight:

Food for thought. Almost all of us has had an experience of the other side as patient/carer, we should be using these lessons in our daily work in the healthcare industries

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