Simplifying Learning in Healthcare
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Simplifying Learning in Healthcare
Sharing how and why "learning" is changing for the better in healthcare
Curated by Joel Selzer
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Ozmosis Announces Launch of ArcheMedX to Disrupt Medical Education | Ozmosis

Ozmosis Announces Launch of ArcheMedX to Disrupt Medical Education | Ozmosis | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Ozmosis, Inc., a leading provider of social business software and care collaboration solutions to the healthcare industry, announced the spin out of ArcheMedX, a healthcare informatics and e-learning technology company delivering collaborative learning solutions to improve medical education. Given the explosive growth of its education business, Ozmosis has also announced that Joel Selzer, Co-Founder & Chairman of Ozmosis, will lead ArcheMedX as CEO. Ike Brenner, Founder and Former CEO of Prematics, will assume day-to-day leadership of Ozmosis.

 

“By spinning out ArcheMedX, we are extending the benefits of Ozmosis to the education market and fundamentally disrupting the learning and assessment model in healthcare”, said Joel Selzer, Chairman of Ozmosis and CEO of ArcheMedX, “and with Ike now leading Ozmosis, both businesses are well positioned to accelerate growth and adoption.”

 

Based on the clinical informatics and collaboration technology developed by Ozmosis and the research and expertise of Brian S. McGowan, PhD, ArcheMedX (/ärk' – ki – med - ics/) has engineered a learning architecture that encourages clinicians to conduct their natural learning actions either individually, as part of a cohort, or within a broader collaborative learning network. “Clinicians are busy and increasingly overwhelmed by emergent medical knowledge and educational content. By centralizing the natural learning actions of clinicians in a single platform, we can now ensure that lessons learned once, can be learnt permanently,” said Brian S McGowan PhD, Co-founder and Chief Learning Officer of ArcheMedX.

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When Doctors and Patients Are Friends

When Doctors and Patients Are Friends | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

As physicians find a role for social media in their medical practices, they discover challenges: Protect privacy and maintain boundaries. According to a survey published in 2011 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, 94% of medical students, 79% of residents and 42% of practicing physicians reported some use of online social networks, nearly all for personal reasons. Among the practicing physicians, 35% said they had received a "friend" request from a patient or family member—and 58% of those who had received those "friend" requests said they always rejected them.

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How Facebook Is Transforming Science and Public Health | Wired Business | Wired.com

How Facebook Is Transforming Science and Public Health | Wired Business | Wired.com | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Facebook has encompassed many things in its nine-year run. From a subtler version of a dating site to a gaming platform and a messaging hub. We’ve seen Facebook and its billion-plus users play a part in influencing politics, the form advertising takes, and how retail happens. Now we’re starting to see Facebook begin to impact science and public health, and it could be Facebook’s biggest industry-changing opportunity yet.

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Technology will replace 80% of what doctors do - Fortune Tech

Technology will replace 80% of what doctors do - Fortune Tech | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Data-driven healthcare won’t replace physicians entirely, but it will help those receptive to technology perform their jobs better.  Today's diagnoses are partially informed by patients' medical histories and partially by symptoms (but patients are bad at communicating what's really going on). They are mostly informed by advertising and the doctor's half-remembered and potentially obsolete lessons from medical school (which are laden with cognitive biases, recency biases, and other human errors). Many times, if you ask three doctors to look at the same problem, you'll get three different diagnoses and three different treatment plans.

 

Healthcare should become more about data-driven deduction and less about trial-and-error. That's hard to pull off without technology, because of the increasing amount of data and research available. Next-generation medicine will utilize more complex models of physiology, and more sensor data than a human MD could comprehend, to suggest personalized diagnosis. Thousands of baseline and multi-omic data points, more integrative history, and demeanor will inform each diagnosis. Ever-improving dialog manager systems will help make data capture and exploration from patients more accurate and comprehensive. Data science will be key to this. In the end, it will reduce costs, reduce physician workloads, and improve patient care.

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The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom, Because The World Is Your Class

The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom, Because The World Is Your Class | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Massive Open Online Courses might seem like best way to use the Internet to open up education, but you’re thinking too small. Technology can turn our entire lives into learning experiences.


Socialstructed learning is an aggregation of microlearning experiences drawn from a rich ecology of content and driven not by grades but by social and intrinsic rewards. The microlearning moment may last a few minutes, hours, or days (if you are absorbed in reading something, tinkering with something, or listening to something from which you just can’t walk away). Socialstructed learning may be the future, but the foundations of this kind of education lie far in the past. Leading philosophers of education--from Socrates to Plutarch, Rousseau to Dewey--talked about many of these ideals centuries ago. Today, we have a host of tools to make their vision reality.

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Doctors, Patients: Prepare for Smartphone Medicine | Physicians News

Doctors, Patients: Prepare for Smartphone Medicine | Physicians News | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

We face ongoing changes in Medicine today which will alter our future practice patterns.  We all recognize the need for better communication with patients.  If the full impact of ObamaCare is realized, this may be more of a challenge as 47 million Americans will enter the pool of insured with access to medical care.  Also, statistics show 10,000 Americans are retiring each day.  When coupled with a potential shortage of 100,000 doctors by 2020, we realize there will be significant challenges to meeting the future healthcare needs of our citizens.

 

One hopeful prospect for dealing with the changes in demand and demographics of the future is the cellphone.  It is estimated that 55% of World citizenry have cellphones now, and by 2018 there will be a cellphone for every person on the planet.  In the United States over 80% of the population has cellphones.  We are entering an era when patients will become more involved in their own medical care and participate with their physician in this care.  Aside from having access to the medical records, cellphone applications are becoming more available for disease management.  Patients are already participating in chat rooms with people with similar diseases to discuss their treatment options.  Patients with multiple sclerosis, for example, interact in chat rooms to discuss response to therapy and new therapy.

 
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Social Media as the Next Web - Brian Solis

Social Media as the Next Web - Brian Solis | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Nielsen and NM Incite released the 2012 Social Media Report recently and in it is an obvious but important observation, social media is coming of age. If attention is a key metric, then social networks are where attention spans go to roam. According to the report, consumers continue to spend more time on social networks than on any other category of sites.

 

Most notably however is the sheer velocity of growth. Nielsen found that total time spent on social media in the U.S. across PCs and mobile devices increased 37% to 121 billion minutes in July 2012, compared to 88 billion in July 2011.

 

The mobile (s0cial) web represents the future of online engagement. This is one of the reasons that Facebook was plagued by speculation prior to and shortly after its IPO. It’s mobile strategy wasn’t fully defined or articulated. However, people are spending more time on mobile devices and the numbers speak for themselves. Mobile web usage is up 82% in 2012 over 2011 and mobile app usage has grown 85%. It’s interesting to note that time spent on PCs is down 4%.

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Khan Academy Approach Poised to Solve a "Wicked Problem" in Healthcare - The Doctor Weighs In

Khan Academy Approach Poised to Solve a "Wicked Problem" in Healthcare - The Doctor Weighs In | Simplifying Learning in Healthcare | Scoop.it

The current Forbes cover features Salman Khan who may be having more impact on education than any other teacher before him. His impact isn’t limited to education.

 

Education and Healthcare are two industries least affected by technology, however this has begun to change. From millions of students and parents to Bill Gates, the Khan Academy has impressed many and inspired some teachers to flip the classroom lecture/homework model on its head as described in the video below. Doctors are now recognizing Khan’s approach can help solve a wicked confluence of issues.

 

Imagine targeted video or textual content that has been curated or created by your physician automatically being delivered to you based on your diagnosis or condition into a secure environment (i.e., most people wouldn’t want articles on their medical conditions going into their regular email where others might see it). This isn’t a science fiction scenario. Rather, it will be possible to do today. Patient relationship management systems are replacing providers’ old patient portals (if they even had one) that did little to impact health outcomes. Modern patient-focused systems are focused instead on improved health, not just administrative items.

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