Silk Worms of southern utah
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Freedom Project

history of Freedom
Daily Herald
Brigham Young sent three mulberry bushes to Freedom when he planned his state-wide industry of silk worms. Edna Coates' father tried to start the industry but didn't have much success.
Chris Snodgress's insight:

Why did the silk industry fail?

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Background info

Silk

 

Chris Snodgress's insight:

The silkworm is the larva or caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori (Latin: "silkworm of the mulberry tree"). It is an economically important insect, being a primary producer of silk. A silkworm's preferred food is white mulberry leaves, but it may also eat the leaves of any other mulberry tree (i.e., Morus rubra or Morus nigra)[citation needed] as well as the Osage Orange. It is entirely dependent on humans for its reproduction and does not occur naturally in the wild. Sericulture, the practice of breeding silkworms for the production of raw silk, has been underway for at least 5,000 years in China,[1] from where it spread to Korea and Japan, and later to India and the West. The silkworm was domesticated from the wild silkmothBombyx mandarina which has a range from northern India to northern China, Korea, Japan and far the eastern regions of Russia. The domesticated silkworm derives from Chinese rather than Japanese or Korean stock.[2][3] It is unlikely that silkworms were domestically bred before the Neolithic age: it was not until then that the tools required to facilitate the manufacturing of larger quantities of silk thread had been developed. The domesticated B. mori and the wild B. mandarina can still breed and sometimes produce hybrids.[4]:342

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Picture of a silkworm moth

Picture of a silkworm moth | Silk Worms of southern utah | Scoop.it
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