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Epibone helps patients "grow their own bone"

Epibone helps patients "grow their own bone" | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
New York regenerative medicine startup EpiBone's tagline is apt: "Grow your own bone." It uses a patient's own stem cells to create transplantable, highly personalized bone grafts, going after a 900,000-strong market of patients that need some variety of bone graft to treat, say, severe bone trauma, growth defects or genetic disorders.
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Microbiome may have shaped early human populations

Microbiome may have shaped early human populations | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have stopped procreating.”
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Heatmaps Reveal Where Humans Feel Certain Emotions On The Body

Heatmaps Reveal Where Humans Feel Certain Emotions On The Body | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“It’s well known that attitudes, emotions and feelings affect our body in a variety of ways. For example, feelings of hopelessness affect the body’s hormone system and change the chemical flows within our brains. Different emotional states act as triggers that impact our biology in a variety of ways. Brain activity changes during different emotional […]”
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Michael Dunn's curator insight, December 14, 1:43 AM

Emotions, natural sciences: Where do we feel different emotions?

Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, December 14, 1:11 PM

be Social:  
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maria taveras's curator insight, December 17, 1:07 PM

A cool research which provides an illustration of where humans feel certain emotions on the body. Now, we may be able to understand why people develop certain illness in their bodies based on this research. 

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New device could make large biological circuits practical

New device could make large biological circuits practical | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.”
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Socrates Logos's curator insight, December 2, 3:00 PM

by
David L. Chandler 

"Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits — systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined.

A team of researchers at MIT has now come up with a way of greatly reducing that unpredictability, introducing a device that could ultimately allow such circuits to behave nearly as predictably as their electronic counterparts. The findings are published this week in the journal Nature Biotechnology, in a paper by associate professor of mechanical engineering Domitilla Del Vecchio and professor of biological engineering Ron Weiss.
The lead author of the paper is Deepak Mishra, an MIT graduate student in biological engineering. Other authors include recent master’s students Phillip Rivera in mechanical engineering and Allen Lin in electrical engineering and computer science.
There are many potential uses for such synthetic biological circuits, Del Vecchio and Weiss explain. “One specific one we’re working on is biosensing — cells that can detect specific molecules in the environment and produce a specific output in response,” Del Vecchio says. One example: cells that could detect markers that indicate the presence of cancer cells, and then trigger the release of molecules targeted to kill those cells.
It is important for such circuits to be able to discriminate accurately between cancerous and noncancerous cells, so they don’t unleash their killing power in the wrong places, Weiss says. To do that, robust information-processing circuits created from biological elements within a cell become “highly critical,” Weiss says.
To date, that kind of robust predictability has not been feasible, in part because of feedback effects when multiple stages of biological circuitry are introduced. The problem arises because unlike in electronic circuits, where one component is physically connected to the next by wires that ensure information is always flowing in a particular direction, biological circuits are made up of components that are all floating around together in the complex fluid environment of a cell’s interior.
Information flow is driven by the chemical interactions of the individual components, which ideally should affect only other specific components. But in practice, attempts to create such biological linkages have often produced results that differed from expectations.
“If you put the circuit together and you expect answer ‘X,’ and instead you get answer ‘Y,’ that could be highly problematical,” Del Vecchio says.
The device the team produced to address that problem is called a load driver, and its effect is similar to that of load drivers used in electronic circuits: It provides a kind of buffer between the signal and the output, preventing the effects of the signaling from backing up through the system and causing delays in outputs.
While this is relatively early-stage research that could take years to reach commercial application, the concept could have a wide variety of applications, the researchers say. For example, it could lead to synthetic biological circuits that constantly measure glucose levels in the blood of diabetic patients, automatically triggering the release of insulin when it is needed.
The addition of this load driver to the arsenal of components available to those designing biological circuits, Del Vecchio says, “could escalate the complexity of circuits you could design,” opening up new possible applications while ensuring that their operation is “robust and predictable.”
James Collins, a professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University who was not associated with this research, says, “Efforts in synthetic biology to create complex gene circuits are often hindered by unanticipated or uncharacterized interactions between submodules of the circuits. These interactions alter the input-output characteristics of the submodules, leading to undesirable circuit behavior.”..."



http://bit.ly/1pOFToz

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Empathic Design: Is Empathy the UX Holy Grail?

Empathic Design: Is Empathy the UX Holy Grail? | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
The need for empathy in design is becoming an increasingly important factor. With most technologies now used by a whole range of people, from different cultures, with a variety of physical, mental, and situational constraints, we must develop an understanding of how we can design products that appeal to, support and enable people. We cannot appreciate what it means to be each and every person that uses a product, but through the use of an empathic design approach we can come to understand how people behave, feel, and tackle the problems in their lives with the use of our products. For a number of examples of Empathic Design check out the Wiki entry onEmpathic DesignArmin Z“”
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How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine

How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Targeted interventions include: Minimally invasive surgeryTargeted drug deliveryRemote sensingSingle cell manipulation
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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, November 23, 3:49 AM

Une équipe Suisse de l'ETH Zurich y travaille

Art Jones's curator insight, November 23, 9:39 AM

This sounds like the stuff of science fiction but it's not.   We have been making smaller and smaller technologies for a while now, that's why smartphones are so smart, packing the power only available in  room sized computers just a decade or more ago. Thanks to 3D printing we are making even more amazing strides in miniaturization, now it seems all things are possible. 


This excerpt explains what's possible now:

With an additive manufacturing technique, the scientists are able to use a complex method to create the micro-robots, or micro-actuators, which are then coated with biomedical materials. The scientists believe they could increase functionality and deliver medication to targets inside the body.


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Empathy Blindness and the Joyless Life | The New Existentialists

Empathy Blindness and the Joyless Life | The New Existentialists | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“People high in alexithymia tend to have serious social difficulties (Vanheule, Desmet, Meganck, & Bogaerts, 2006; Spitzer, Siebel-Jurges, Barnow, & Grabe, 2005).”These social problems seem to be directly linked to a central feature of alexithymia—what might be called a kind of empathy blindness.Even when well-intentioned, people with alexithymia find it extraordinarily difficult to understand or take on the perspective of others, and as a result, they tend to come across as self-centered and offensive. For example, people who are high in alexithymia also score low on a measure of empathy called the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (Guttman & Laporte, 2002; Grynberg, Luminet, Corneille, Grezes, & Berthoz, 2010).
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Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence

Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
What happens in a technological context where a device becomes obsolete within a very short time? This is central themes of the study carried out by the artist and researcher Benjamin Gaulon

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Marco Mancuso's curator insight, November 20, 10:08 AM

Benjamin Gaulon is an artist, researcher, internationally known for his détournement, hacking, recycling and critical making practices. Founder at Recyclism Hacklab and author of the essay "Hardware hacking and recycling strategies in an age of technological obsolescence". Filippo Lorenzin had an interview with him for Digicult

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What do patients want most from health apps? Here are 10 answers

What do patients want most from health apps? Here are 10 answers | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, November 14, 4:53 AM

The thing that stands out for me here: patients want disease information and practical support, yet developers (and their sponsors) are more likely to publish trackers and diaries, which only make it to third place.

 

I know some interesting integrated solutions which attempt to hit a number of the targets in this chart are on the way, but if this PatientView data tells us anything, it is that 'single solution' apps aren't of a great deal of interest to patients -- unless, perhaps, they focus on disease information.

 

 

 

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Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support

Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Microsoft has been winning generally approving headlines for its Microsoft Band fitness tracker and accompanying Microsoft Health platform, since both were revealed – seemingly unintentionally at first – on Wednesday.One of the key points about both hardware and software is their cross-platform nature: they won’t just be restricted to people with a Windows Phone smartphone and/or a computer running the Windows OS. They’ll also support Android, iOS and Mac.Microsoft Health is also open to other devices and apps, with Jawbone’s Up and the apps MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal and RunKeeper the first to be announced.
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 9:19 AM

“We plan to have a regular cadence of Microsoft Health announcements including additional device and service partnerships, SDK availability and additional cross-platform applications and services,” blogged Microsoft’s Todd Holmdahl.

Bart Collet's comment, October 31, 12:23 PM
true! aggregate or die!
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Should we diagnose rare diseases with smartphones?

Should we diagnose rare diseases with smartphones? | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
An object in your pocket could help diagnose rare diseases like Ebola, finds David Robson – and one day it might even replace the doctor’s surgery too.As fear of the Ebola virus escalates, Eric Topol thinks that we’re missing an important weapon. And you just need to reach into your pocket to find it. “Most communicable diseases can be diagnosed with a smartphone,” he says. “Rather than putting people into quarantine for three weeks – how about seeing if they harbour it in their blood?” A quicker response could also help prevent mistakes, such as the patient in Dallas who was sent home from hospital with a high fever, only to later die from the infection.It’s a provocative claim, but Topol is not shy about calling for a revolution in the way we deal with Ebola – or any other health issue for that matter. A professor of genomics at the Scripps Research Institute in California, his last book heralded “the creative destruction of medicine” through new technology. Smartphones are already helping to do away with many of the least pleasant aspects of sickness – including the long hospital visits and agonising wait for treatment. An easier way to diagnose Ebola is just one example of these sweeping changes.So far, however, few doctors have embraced these possibilities. “The medical cocoon has not allowed a digital invasion,” says Topol, “while the rest of the world has already assimilated the digital revolution into its day-to-day life.” That’s not due to lack of demand: many patients are already monitoring their health through their phone, with apps that check your skin for cancer from a selfie, for example. These programs are not alwaysdesigned with the accuracy most doctors would require, however – and some fear that by missing a diagnosis and offering a false sense of security, they could cost lives. “The slower the healthcare system is in exploring these things, the more people are at risk by doing the exploration on their own,” says Estrin.
more at : http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20141017-the-ebola-detector-in-your-pocket
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nrip's curator insight, October 17, 4:35 PM

My associates and I have built a mobile Ebola diagnosis and data collection prototype. If interested in exploring possible uses of the same for your organization, please drop me a message.

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Empathic Design or How to Put the Experience Above All Else - Michael Ventura, Sub Rosa - YouTube

Empathic Design or How to Put the Experience Above All Else - Michael Ventura, Sub Rosa - YouTube | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Princeton University Lecture - October 9, 2014 - The Keller Center welcomed Michael Ventura, Founder and CEO of strategy-led design and innovation practice, ...
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The war on waste: can material innovation save the world? - live chat

The war on waste: can material innovation save the world? - live chat | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Join the experts for a live chat on Friday 14 November 1-2pm GMT to discuss how to place sustainability front and centre of design innovation
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There Is No ‘Healthy’ Microbiome

There Is No ‘Healthy’ Microbiome | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

IN the late 17th century, the Dutch naturalist Anton van Leeuwenhoek looked at his own dental plaque through a microscope and saw a world of tiny cells “very prettily a-moving.” He could not have predicted that a few centuries later, the trillions of microbes that share our lives — collectively known as the microbiome — would rank among the hottest areas of biology.

These microscopic partners help us by digesting our food, training our immune systems and crowding out other harmful microbes that could cause disease. In return, everything from the food we eat to the medicines we take can shape our microbial communities — with important implications for our health. Studies have found that changes in our microbiome accompany medical problems from obesity to diabetes to colon cancer.


Via Complexity Digest, Flora Moon
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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, November 10, 6:14 AM

The fascinating world of the microbiome and the opportunities it heralds for future medicine

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, November 12, 3:45 AM

Our microbes are truly part of us, and just as we are vast in our variety, so, too, are they. We must embrace this complexity if we hope to benefit from it.

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New class of synthetic molecules mimics antibodies

New class of synthetic molecules mimics antibodies | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“(Phys.org)—A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.”
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7 Questions Shaping the Patient Digital Health Platform (PDHP) Ecosystem, via Vince Kuraitis

7 Questions Shaping the Patient Digital Health Platform (PDHP) Ecosystem, via Vince Kuraitis | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ I hope you’ll enjoy reviewing my slides from my December 3 presentation at the 11th Annual Healthcare Unbound Conference. The presentation is formally entitled: “Patient Digital Health Platforms (PDHPs): Epicenter of Healthcare Transformation?”… …but more informally, I pose and address 7 key questions — the answers to which will shape the future of the PDHP …”
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Rx Narrative: Story As Medicine #dotmed14

Rx Narrative: Story As Medicine #dotmed14 | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Last Friday I had the great pleasure of presenting at DotMED The Creative Medicine Conference, on the role of story in medicine.  I spoke about how healthcare is at heart a narrative activity and h...
petabush's insight:
hearing these stories is an important aspect of design for wellbeing. creating opportunities for people to share their health stories is crucial to enrich the design process and enable further solutions to be explored.
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Infographic: How Millennials Are Reshaping Digital Health

Infographic: How Millennials Are Reshaping Digital Health | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Infographic illustrates the unique Millennial consumer POVs for managing, maintaining their health and what it means for digital health technology.”
Via Celine Sportisse, Emmanuel Capitaine , Digitives
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Projective Ecologies

Projective Ecologies | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Projective Ecologies, by Chris Reed, ASLA, founder of Stoss Landscape Urbanism, and Nina-Marie Lister, Affil. ASLA, professor at Ryerson University, is a timely overview of contemporary thinking ab...”
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Empathize and Prototype: A Hands On Dive into the Key Tools of Design Thinking, Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate

Empathize and Prototype: A Hands On Dive into the Key Tools of Design Thinking, Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Move beyond theory and dive into hands-on practice in the art of innovation. Tackle innovation challenges from start to finish and gain an in-depth understanding of these key tenets of design thinking and how to incorporate them into your work. ”Empathize with your customer, synthesize your learnings, and rapidly prototype and test your new ideas. Master techniques for gaining empathy with customers and immediately put them to use in a series of hands on exercises that guide you from synthesis to prototyping and testing.Learn How To:“ - Engage customers to forge deep connections and gain valuable consumer insights - Synthesize findings into a compelling problem statement - Prototype concepts in a low-cost manner - Rapidly test concepts with end users to gain insights about solutions and user needs and reduce your time to market”
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Sensors And Sensitivity

Sensors And Sensitivity | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
This is the sensible trajectory of connected sensor technology. The world around us gains the ability to perceive us, rather than wearable sensors trying to figure out what’s going on in our environment by taking a continuous measure of us.
Via Alex Butler
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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, August 5, 9:13 AM

A useful lesson - wearables should not just be about harvesting data for the sake of it. By incorporating into objects we are in contact with, e.g. seat belts, we can make it a seamless part of our everyday life to gather information when it really matters.

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10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever

10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
The future of medicine has arrived.No, we're not talking about robot surgeons, implantable memory-augmentation devices, or doctors wearing Google Glass. The game-changing innovations on this list are more than distant dreams or inventions no one really knows what to with yet. Most should be available as early as 2015.Every year, the Cleveland Clinic comes up with a list of new devices or treatments that are expected to help improve our daily lives and reduce our risks of developing disease. Only time will tell whether their considerable promise pans out.Here are the top 10 new medications, treatments, and technologies to watch for in 2015, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
Via Alex Butler
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Kim Kubiak's curator insight, November 6, 11:24 AM

My favorites are #9 and #1.

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This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED

This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers.”
Via dagautier, dbtmobile
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dagautier's curator insight, November 12, 8:17 AM

"Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers."

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Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast

Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve...”
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Empathy and Design: What You Should Consider | Design Shack

Empathy and Design: What You Should Consider | Design Shack | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Do you need to think about empathy when you design? (The answer is yes.) It may seem like a pretty common sense answer, but too often we get caught up in the design and message and not the user.Who are you creating the design for? How will they connect with it? That’s where empathy comes in.Thinking about it from the start of the process can help you put together an even more successful project. (As you read through this post, look at the examples and think about the emotions these sites make you feel.)by Carrie Cousins
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