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Medication management goes digital

Medication management goes digital | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Medication management for patients, as well as their physicians and pharmacists, is going digital.

Via Philippe Loizon, Rowan Norrie
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John Lemos Forman's curator insight, August 11, 2014 3:19 PM

São inúmeras as possibilidades de uso das TICs em benefício tanto dos pacientes como dos gestores das unidades de saúde.

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Diabetes patients who use digital tools self-report better health - Survey

Diabetes patients who use digital tools self-report better health - Survey | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

New survey data from digital health agency Klick Health shows that diabetes patients who use digital tools to manage their health also feel healthier.

Klick Health employed Survey Sampling International (SSI) to poll 2,000 American adults with diabetes either online or via the telephone.

Based on responses about how they use technology to manage their health, they segmented the group into three categories: those who manage their health daily or weekly with integrated digital technologies (integrators), those who go online to seek health information on a monthly basis (seekers), and those who don’t use the internet to manage their health at all (traditionalists).

The integrators group, the true digital health users, made up just 18 percent of the sample, but 13 percent of integrators reported being in excellent health. Seekers made up 47 percent of the sample and 4 percent of seekers said they were in excellent health. Finally, the remaining 35 percent were traditionalists, and only 2 percent of that group reported being in excellent health.

Because it’s a survey based on self-reported health status, the data doesn’t prove that connected patients are actually healthier than non-connected patients. But it does provide evidence that either they’re healthier or they believe they’re healthier, which is significant in and of itself.

Nineteen percent of patients reported using mobile technology for a health-related activity. Of these, most wanted more data-driven interactions with their doctors. Two-thirds said they would like an app to remind them to take their medication, 75 percent wanted apps to connect them with their doctors, and 78 percent were open to sharing personally-collected health data with their doctors.

Overall, 80 percent of the mobile connected group were interested in having an app recommended to them by their doctor.

more at http://mobihealthnews.com/40600/survey-diabetes-patients-who-use-digital-tools-self-report-better-health/


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Dr. Gretchen Richards's curator insight, February 16, 3:40 PM

If you are diabetic, do you use any of the new software tools or medical devices on the market? If you do, do you agree or disagree with this article?

Etain Limited's curator insight, February 17, 8:47 AM

It's so great to see the digital revolution hailing these really personal advances that make such a huge difference to everyday people like you and me.

 

More and more we're seeing the humble app, smart phones and wearable technology become not a just fashionable lifestyle choice, or some kind of expendable income indicator, but as genuine quality of life improvers. Before long we'll all be wearing watches and other gadgets that read our vitals, measure the mineral content of our sweat, track changes in our core temperature.... then when we're under the weather and looking for a Doctors appoint, at the touch of a button all that data will be winging it's way to our GPs! Giving them a heads up on our condition, allowing them to diagnose and treat us more effectively. Now who wouldn't want that?

Diabète 's curator insight, February 17, 9:59 AM

le rôle des médecins dans la recommandation des applications clairement mis en lumière ...un article relevé par Rémy Teston 

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Design Requires Empathy

Design Requires Empathy | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

by Jerry Klein

The first step in design is to “walk in the shoes of another person.” This may seem like an obvious first step, but it requires practice to step out of one’s normal tracks and look at a problem with a fresh perspective.In their book Designing for Growth, http://www.designingforgrowthbooks.com/field-book/

Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie tell us that “design starts with empathy.”

Empathy means you try to feel with the person you are designing for. It requires the designer to consider their thoughts and feelings, and to treat them as a person, and not just as an economic unit.


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How Millennials Are Changing Product Development for Good | WIRED

How Millennials Are Changing Product Development for Good | WIRED | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Like most of you, I’ve read dozens of articles over the past few years about all the ways millennials are different from previous generations: as employees, as consumers, and as innovators.”
Via jean lievens, Digitives
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Silk Implants Fight Bacterial Infection Then Vanish - IEEE Spectrum

Silk Implants Fight Bacterial Infection Then Vanish - IEEE Spectrum | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Simple device made of silk and magnesium can be wirelessly triggered to fight infections using heat or drugs
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A Mini Farm That Produces Food From Plastic-Eating Mushrooms | WIRED

A Mini Farm That Produces Food From Plastic-Eating Mushrooms | WIRED | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
That’s right, you can eat mushrooms that eat plastic.
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Weavers Turn Silk Into Diabetes Test Strips

Weavers Turn Silk Into Diabetes Test Strips | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
In India, where silk is plentiful, the luxe fabric turns out to be more efficient — and cheaper — than paper or plastic for testing a diabetic's glucose levels.
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Microbiome may have shaped early human populations

Microbiome may have shaped early human populations | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have stopped procreating.”
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Heatmaps Reveal Where Humans Feel Certain Emotions On The Body

Heatmaps Reveal Where Humans Feel Certain Emotions On The Body | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“It’s well known that attitudes, emotions and feelings affect our body in a variety of ways. For example, feelings of hopelessness affect the body’s hormone system and change the chemical flows within our brains. Different emotional states act as triggers that impact our biology in a variety of ways. Brain activity changes during different emotional […]”
Via Edwin Rutsch
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Michael Dunn's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:43 AM

Emotions, natural sciences: Where do we feel different emotions?

Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:11 PM

be Social:  
https://www.facebook.com/JakartaWebDeveloper

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New device could make large biological circuits practical

New device could make large biological circuits practical | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.”
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Socrates Logos's curator insight, December 2, 2014 3:00 PM

by
David L. Chandler 

"Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits — systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined.

A team of researchers at MIT has now come up with a way of greatly reducing that unpredictability, introducing a device that could ultimately allow such circuits to behave nearly as predictably as their electronic counterparts. The findings are published this week in the journal Nature Biotechnology, in a paper by associate professor of mechanical engineering Domitilla Del Vecchio and professor of biological engineering Ron Weiss.
The lead author of the paper is Deepak Mishra, an MIT graduate student in biological engineering. Other authors include recent master’s students Phillip Rivera in mechanical engineering and Allen Lin in electrical engineering and computer science.
There are many potential uses for such synthetic biological circuits, Del Vecchio and Weiss explain. “One specific one we’re working on is biosensing — cells that can detect specific molecules in the environment and produce a specific output in response,” Del Vecchio says. One example: cells that could detect markers that indicate the presence of cancer cells, and then trigger the release of molecules targeted to kill those cells.
It is important for such circuits to be able to discriminate accurately between cancerous and noncancerous cells, so they don’t unleash their killing power in the wrong places, Weiss says. To do that, robust information-processing circuits created from biological elements within a cell become “highly critical,” Weiss says.
To date, that kind of robust predictability has not been feasible, in part because of feedback effects when multiple stages of biological circuitry are introduced. The problem arises because unlike in electronic circuits, where one component is physically connected to the next by wires that ensure information is always flowing in a particular direction, biological circuits are made up of components that are all floating around together in the complex fluid environment of a cell’s interior.
Information flow is driven by the chemical interactions of the individual components, which ideally should affect only other specific components. But in practice, attempts to create such biological linkages have often produced results that differed from expectations.
“If you put the circuit together and you expect answer ‘X,’ and instead you get answer ‘Y,’ that could be highly problematical,” Del Vecchio says.
The device the team produced to address that problem is called a load driver, and its effect is similar to that of load drivers used in electronic circuits: It provides a kind of buffer between the signal and the output, preventing the effects of the signaling from backing up through the system and causing delays in outputs.
While this is relatively early-stage research that could take years to reach commercial application, the concept could have a wide variety of applications, the researchers say. For example, it could lead to synthetic biological circuits that constantly measure glucose levels in the blood of diabetic patients, automatically triggering the release of insulin when it is needed.
The addition of this load driver to the arsenal of components available to those designing biological circuits, Del Vecchio says, “could escalate the complexity of circuits you could design,” opening up new possible applications while ensuring that their operation is “robust and predictable.”
James Collins, a professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University who was not associated with this research, says, “Efforts in synthetic biology to create complex gene circuits are often hindered by unanticipated or uncharacterized interactions between submodules of the circuits. These interactions alter the input-output characteristics of the submodules, leading to undesirable circuit behavior.”..."



http://bit.ly/1pOFToz

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Empathic Design: Is Empathy the UX Holy Grail?

Empathic Design: Is Empathy the UX Holy Grail? | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
The need for empathy in design is becoming an increasingly important factor. With most technologies now used by a whole range of people, from different cultures, with a variety of physical, mental, and situational constraints, we must develop an understanding of how we can design products that appeal to, support and enable people. We cannot appreciate what it means to be each and every person that uses a product, but through the use of an empathic design approach we can come to understand how people behave, feel, and tackle the problems in their lives with the use of our products. For a number of examples of Empathic Design check out the Wiki entry onEmpathic DesignArmin Z“”
Via Edwin Rutsch
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How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine

How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Targeted interventions include: Minimally invasive surgeryTargeted drug deliveryRemote sensingSingle cell manipulation
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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, November 23, 2014 3:49 AM

Une équipe Suisse de l'ETH Zurich y travaille

Art Jones's curator insight, November 23, 2014 9:39 AM

This sounds like the stuff of science fiction but it's not.   We have been making smaller and smaller technologies for a while now, that's why smartphones are so smart, packing the power only available in  room sized computers just a decade or more ago. Thanks to 3D printing we are making even more amazing strides in miniaturization, now it seems all things are possible. 


This excerpt explains what's possible now:

With an additive manufacturing technique, the scientists are able to use a complex method to create the micro-robots, or micro-actuators, which are then coated with biomedical materials. The scientists believe they could increase functionality and deliver medication to targets inside the body.


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Empathy Blindness and the Joyless Life | The New Existentialists

Empathy Blindness and the Joyless Life | The New Existentialists | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“People high in alexithymia tend to have serious social difficulties (Vanheule, Desmet, Meganck, & Bogaerts, 2006; Spitzer, Siebel-Jurges, Barnow, & Grabe, 2005).”These social problems seem to be directly linked to a central feature of alexithymia—what might be called a kind of empathy blindness.Even when well-intentioned, people with alexithymia find it extraordinarily difficult to understand or take on the perspective of others, and as a result, they tend to come across as self-centered and offensive. For example, people who are high in alexithymia also score low on a measure of empathy called the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (Guttman & Laporte, 2002; Grynberg, Luminet, Corneille, Grezes, & Berthoz, 2010).
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Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence

Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
What happens in a technological context where a device becomes obsolete within a very short time? This is central themes of the study carried out by the artist and researcher Benjamin Gaulon

Via Marco Mancuso, arslog
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Marco Mancuso's curator insight, November 20, 2014 10:08 AM

Benjamin Gaulon is an artist, researcher, internationally known for his détournement, hacking, recycling and critical making practices. Founder at Recyclism Hacklab and author of the essay "Hardware hacking and recycling strategies in an age of technological obsolescence". Filippo Lorenzin had an interview with him for Digicult

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The Wellness Syndrome by Carl Cederström & André Spicer – exploitation with a smiley face

The Wellness Syndrome by Carl Cederström & André Spicer – exploitation with a smiley face | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
People who fail to look after their bodies are now demonised as lazy, feeble or weak-willed, writes Steven Poole
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Interesting to read this with the present proliferation of fitness trackers and consider how our data could be used.
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10 Sensor Innovations Driving the Digital Health Revolution - BIONICLY

10 Sensor Innovations Driving the Digital Health Revolution - BIONICLY | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ This year I.B.M dedicated its Five in Five series (an annual list of five technologies that are likely to advance dramatically) solely to sensors. Digital ...”
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New Open Access Publication – The Development of Narrative Practices in Medicine c.1960–c.2000

New Open Access Publication – The Development of Narrative Practices in Medicine c.1960–c.2000 | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
A new volume from the Wellcome Witness to Contemporary Medicine series: ‘… if I have to explain to someone, like the anthropologist from Mars, what any of these words like compassion or whatever is...
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How Quantified-Self Will Redefine the Future of the Enterprise | WIRED

How Quantified-Self Will Redefine the Future of the Enterprise | WIRED | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
The last several years have marked the rise of the Internet of Things and Big Data. These trends enabled individuals to gain unprecedented insights into their own daily behaviors through self-quantification technologies, ultimately empowering them to make healthier daily decisions. But self-quantification technologies won’t only allow us to control our waistlines—they’re also poised to help…
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Super-insulated clothing could eliminate need for indoor heating

Super-insulated clothing could eliminate need for indoor heating | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—By wearing clothes that have been dip-coated in a silver nanowire (AgNW) solution that is highly radiation-insulating, a person may stay so warm in the winter that they can greatly reduce or even eliminate their need for heating their home. Considering that 47% of global energy is spent ...
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Factors to consider when designing health tech for seniors

Factors to consider when designing health tech for seniors | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Mobile applications alone aren’t the answer.Simplicity and service are the keys to adoption.Focus on solving problems, not technology.Engage family members.Go direct to the consumer if you can. Understand that it’s still early, and be patient.
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, January 8, 4:53 AM

A refreshingly sensible list of criteria, for once

kamagrahilfe's curator insight, January 8, 5:33 AM

Kamagra online Deutschland mit kostenlosem Versand

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New class of synthetic molecules mimics antibodies

New class of synthetic molecules mimics antibodies | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“(Phys.org)—A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.”
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7 Questions Shaping the Patient Digital Health Platform (PDHP) Ecosystem, via Vince Kuraitis

7 Questions Shaping the Patient Digital Health Platform (PDHP) Ecosystem, via Vince Kuraitis | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ I hope you’ll enjoy reviewing my slides from my December 3 presentation at the 11th Annual Healthcare Unbound Conference. The presentation is formally entitled: “Patient Digital Health Platforms (PDHPs): Epicenter of Healthcare Transformation?”… …but more informally, I pose and address 7 key questions — the answers to which will shape the future of the PDHP …”
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Rx Narrative: Story As Medicine #dotmed14

Rx Narrative: Story As Medicine #dotmed14 | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Last Friday I had the great pleasure of presenting at DotMED The Creative Medicine Conference, on the role of story in medicine.  I spoke about how healthcare is at heart a narrative activity and h...
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hearing these stories is an important aspect of design for wellbeing. creating opportunities for people to share their health stories is crucial to enrich the design process and enable further solutions to be explored.
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Infographic: How Millennials Are Reshaping Digital Health

Infographic: How Millennials Are Reshaping Digital Health | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Infographic illustrates the unique Millennial consumer POVs for managing, maintaining their health and what it means for digital health technology.”
Via Celine Sportisse, Emmanuel Capitaine , Digitives
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Projective Ecologies

Projective Ecologies | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Projective Ecologies, by Chris Reed, ASLA, founder of Stoss Landscape Urbanism, and Nina-Marie Lister, Affil. ASLA, professor at Ryerson University, is a timely overview of contemporary thinking ab...”
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