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E.O.N. | Evolutive Organic iNterface

E.O.N - Evolutive organic interface. Biotechnology that integrates with your body to make your life as perfect as never before. It is an Interface that changes your…

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Mediamatic.net - Bio-me

Mediamatic.net - Bio-me | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Bio-me, celebrates designing with organisms. Mediamatic presents Bio-me, a 3-day symposium and festival that celebrates designing with organisms. Join us for talks, workshops, presentations, tastings and more.

Bio-me functions as a broad bio-cultural lab within the city of Amsterdam. By inviting artist, designers, engineers, architects, scientist, farmers, chefs and the public, Bio-me aims to create a shared knowledge environment and production space to investigate the social, technological and cultural implications and potential of Fungal and Bio-based materials through art, architecture and design.

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Alessio Erioli's curator insight, August 26, 3:38 AM

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Epibone helps patients "grow their own bone"

Epibone helps patients "grow their own bone" | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
New York regenerative medicine startup EpiBone's tagline is apt: "Grow your own bone." It uses a patient's own stem cells to create transplantable, highly personalized bone grafts, going after a 900,000-strong market of patients that need some variety of bone graft to treat, say, severe bone trauma, growth defects or genetic disorders.
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Grounding Is a Key Mechanism by Which Your Body Maintains Health

Grounding Is a Key Mechanism by Which Your Body Maintains Health | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

"Have you ever noticed how good it feels to walk barefoot on a sandy beach, or in a forest? There is a reason for that—it’s called the grounding effect. The reason for this sense of well-being is due to the fact that you’re receiving a surge of potent healing electrons from the ground."

 

The earth has a slightly negative charge, so when you stand barefoot on that sand, electrons from the earth flow into your body, giving you a virtual “transfusion” of healing power.

 

The featured documentary, The Grounded 2, is a sequel to the film The Grounded, released in 2013. The sequel features Step Sinatra, the son of cardiologist Stephen Sinatra MD, astronaut Dr. Edgar Mitchell, and yours truly, among many others.

 

Step was a Wall Street trader until his health suddenly began to decline, bringing him to the brink of death. He credits his ultimate recovery to learning about grounding, along with a switch to an all-organic diet.

In 2010, his father, Dr. Stephen Sinatra released a book on the healing power of grounding called Earthing: The Most Important Health Discovery Ever?, co-authored with Clint Ober, one of the pioneers in this field.




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Officina Corpuscoli » The Future of Plastic

Officina Corpuscoli » The Future of Plastic | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
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TechWell | Debunking the Left-Brain/Right-Brain Myth

TechWell | Debunking the Left-Brain/Right-Brain Myth | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Supposedly, if you’re right-brained, you're more creative and artistic. If you’re left-brained, you’re more methodical and analytical. It turns out all this categorization is a myth. There's no evidence anyone uses one side of the brain more than the other or that either drives personality traits.
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Drink Up: Tree Branches Can Be Effective Water Filters | Gadgets, Science & Technology

Drink Up: Tree Branches Can Be Effective Water Filters | Gadgets, Science & Technology | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Since that expensive water filtration pitcher in your refrigerator is less than portable when you go camping, MIT researchers have given us a natural way to ...
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Biofuel Tools Applied to Household Soaps

Biofuel Tools Applied to Household Soaps | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

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Socrates Logos's curator insight, May 30, 4:04 PM

by
STEPHANIE STROM

"Consumer products containing ingredients made using an advanced form of engineering known as synthetic biology are beginning to show up more often on grocery and department store shelves.

A liquid laundry detergent made by Ecover, a Belgian company that makes “green” household products including the Method line, contains an oil produced by algae whose genetic code was altered using synthetic biology. The algae’s DNA sequence was changed in a lab, according to Tom Domen, the company’s manager for long-term innovation.
Ecover calls the algae-produced oil a “natural” replacement for palm kernel oil, which is in such high demand that environmentalists are concerned that tropical rain forests are being felled to grow palm trees, disturbing ecosystems and threatening endangered animals.
“Finding a sustainable source of palm oil is, of course, difficult,” Mr. Domen said. “This new oil is a more sustainable alternative from a new technology.”
That technology is synthetic biology, which involves the creation of biological systems intended for specific purposes. Synthetic biology, originally aimed at producing biofuels, has been around for about 20 years, but applications have only recently begun to emerge across several industries including cosmetics, flavorings and scents....."


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Advanced micro- and nanofabrication technologies for tissue engineering


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Socrates Logos's curator insight, May 31, 2:51 PM

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Shapira A, Kim DH, Dvir T.

"The ability of the living body to heal and regenerate itself following trauma is astonishing. Numerous events of repair and regeneration occur during our lifetime, most of which we are never aware of. Unfortunately, in some cases, the injury or defect cannot be adequately repaired solely by nature and medical intervention is required. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field of science that integrates knowledge from engineering, biology, chemistry and medicine [1]. It focuses on the development of functional tissues or organs that can be used to repair or substitute their defected, injured or diseased natural counterparts. As opposed to superficial growth of cells in a culture dish, cells that populate a functional tissue are usually integrated in a complex, three-dimensional (3D) architecture of extracellular matrix (ECM) and vasculature. With the recent advances in cellular biology research, it becomes increasingly clear that the micro- and nanoscale cues in the surrounding microenvironment of the cells have a profound effect on their growth, differentiation, morphology and metabolic state [2, 3]. At a higher hierarchical level, the cues provided by the ECM can direct the morphogenesis of the whole tissue. When they recognized the importance of chemical and biomechanical signals in tissue organization, scientists began to develop materials and methods for mimicking the natural cellular microenvironment. In this special section of Biofabrication , we bring together original research articles from top scientists in the field of biomaterials and regenerative medicine. Each presents state-of-the-art micro- and nanotechnologies and developments in biofabrication for tissue engineering. Great emphasis is currently given to the biofabrication of biomimetic 3D scaffolds that replicate the architecture and mechanical properties of the natural ECM. Fabrication methods such as self-assembly, particulate-leaching, freeze-drying, phase-separation and electrospinning were developed to produce biodegradable, porous polymeric scaffolds from natural or synthetic materials. The fabricated scaffolds can also be further modified to improve cell adherence or present and deliver chemical cues that can 'guide' the cells toward their desired fate (e.g. proliferation, differentiation, migration, regulation of a specific cellular function, etc). The porous scaffold is then populated with cells that secrete a structural protein network and thus create their own ECM. This traditional approach, which is called 'top-down' or 'solid-scaffold-based tissue engineering', is demonstrated in this special issue by Szymanski and Feinberg [4]. In their paper, a method for the fabrication of an alginate and alginate-fibrin-based microfibrous structure with tunable geometries is described. The authors used photolithography in order to fabricate an elastic stamp for imprinting the biomaterial onto a thermally sensitive sacrificial layer. Subsequently, the material was cross-linked and the microstructures were released from the support. The resulting fine fabric supported the polarization of myoblasts and the formation of interconnected cell strands. Another example of using a lithographic method for fabrication of biodegradable scaffold is reported by Kim et al [5]. The group used UV-assisted capillary force lithography to fabricate nanopatterned cell culture substrates for vascular tissue engineering. By varying the amount and ratio of the constituents of poly(ethylene glycol)-gelatin methacrylate hydrogel, the elasticity and degradation rate of the composite structure could be tuned. Importantly, in comparison to an unpatterned substrate, endothelial cells showed better attachment and native vascular cell-like morphology when seeded on the patterned scaffold. The pattern also promoted rapid migration and anisotropic organization of the cells. Together, these two lithography-assisted techniques could be applied in a wide range of tissue engineering applications when a controllable and precise fabrication of fine geometries is required. In order to closely mimic the natural 3D extracellular environment and attain improved substrate-specific cell adhesion and spreading, a unique composite scaffold made of biofunctionalized, electrospun fibers and a hydrogel was fabricated by Schulte et al [6]. Following a short period of pre-culturing on the functionalized fibers, the cell-seeded matrix was covered with a protective semi-synthetic hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel that further supported cell proliferation and spreading along the embedded fibers. While embedding an originally superficial cell-seeded fibrous matrix in a hydrogel represents an intriguing strategy for mimicking the natural 3D environment of the cells, the native architecture of the ECM may also be mimicked by spatial fabrication of the fibers themselves. For instance, Park et al [7] developed a method to fabricate fibrous, 3D cell-laden alginate scaffolds using a single microfluidic platform. The authors showed the capability of their set-up to control the shape, volume and porosity of the scaffolds while preserving their delicate structure. Moreover, the porous nature of the scaffolds, which permits a high diffusion rate, was found to be superior in maintaining cell viability when compared to a 3D alginate non-fibrous block. Another creative strategy for the fabrication of 3D fibrous scaffolds was developed by Park et al [8]. The authors describe a hybrid process for thermal fusion of uniaxially oriented electrospun nanofibers by algorithm-directed molten polymer deposition. The aligned fibers were bound together by thermally extruded microstructures to create 2D mats that can be used as one-layer fibrous substrates or can be stacked to produce 3D multilayer constructs. The feasibility of these composite scaffolds for application in muscle tissue engineering was demonstrated by obtaining viable and highly aligned cultured myoblasts. Overall, the aforementioned studies describe three elegant strategies for fabricating fibrous 3D scaffolds. The morphological and biochemical resemblance of these scaffolds to the native ECM, together with their biocompatibility and biodegradability, underline their potential to serve as biomimetic substrates for tissue engineering applications. The solid-scaffold-based approach of populating a pre-fabricated scaffold with cells was also utilized by Zieber et al [9]. Recognizing the importance of prevascularization of engineered tissues for maintenance of cell viability and for effective integration with the host, the researchers have used a CO2 laser engraving system to create an array of microscale channels within alginate macroporous scaffolds. The channels were then decorated with adhesion peptides and angiogenic factors to create a blood-vessel-supporting microenvironment. Upon sequential seeding of endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, the unique architecture and the biochemical cues promoted the generation of vessel-like networks within an engineered cardiac patch. Another important aspect for engineering functional cardiac tissues is the structural and functional anisotropy of the tissue. In order to control these parameters, Bian et al [10] have applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches composed of cardiomyocytes. The authors have shown that the alignment of the cells and secreted ECM proteins can be enhanced by extending the transverse diameter of the elliptical pores that crossed the patch networks. The improved alignment resulted in increased anisotropy of the action potential propagation and augmented contractile forces. While synthetic scaffolds made of biocompatible materials can be fabricated to closely mimic the ECM structure, they still lack much of the fine, complex architecture and biochemical cues that can be found in the native ECM. In a study by Shevach et al [11], the omentum, a double sheet of peritoneum, was manipulated to serve as a natural, autologous scaffold for engineering functional cardiac tissue. It was found that the biochemical and mechanical properties of the processed omental tissue could support the survival and assembly of cardiac cells into a contractile patch. The patch could then be populated with endothelial cells to generate a vascularized tissue for better integration with the host. Since the omentum can easily and safely be extracted from patients, this approach might be utilized to engineer autologous patches. To prove this concept, the authors also showed that the omentum-based matrices can support the growth of induced pluripotent and mesenchymal stem cells, which in theory can also be isolated from the same patient. Whereas fabrication of ECM-like scaffolds is a key process in tissue engineering for regenerative medicine, it can also be utilized for construction of 3D tissue models for more basic research. Ock and Li [12] have used a laser foaming technique to fabricate an array of micro-scale porous polylactic acid scaffolds for high throughput, tissue-based biomedical assays. The authors have studied the effects of the process parameters on the resulting internal architecture of the scaffolds and demonstrated enhanced cell viability within the scaffolds. The fabricated microarray represents a more biologically relevant model for drug screening than the common 2D cultures. While the 'top-down' approach is mostly suitable for engineering thin, non-vascularized artificial tissues, the construction of thicker, complex tissues with micro- and nanoscale architectural characteristics is still a challenge. The emerging 'bottom-up' or 'modular' approach aims to overcome this issue. This concept is based on the generation of microscale tissue building blocks that incorporate complex artificial micro- and nano-architectures resembling those of a native tissue. The tissue components can be fabricated by using various methods such as self-assembled cell aggregates, generation of cell sheets and fabrication of cell-laden hydrogels. These building blocks are then assembled to form a large tissue construct using methods such as random packing, stacking of layers and 3D bioprinting. For example, in their article Lee et al [13] used a 3D printing method for reconstruction of the external ear. The authors encapsulated chondrocytes and adipocytes in an alginate hydrogel and dispensed them into ear-shaped structures made of sacrificial-layer-supported polycaprolactone. Using this strategy, both the shape and the composition of the ear were faithfully mimicked. Importantly, the adipocytes and chondrocytes survived the printing process, proliferated and showed both adipogenesis and chondrogenesis, respectively. Without doubt, this study has the potential to broaden the current arsenal of practical methods used in reconstructive medicine, especially in cases when the target tissue or organ has a complex structure. Another example of harnessing the power of 3D printing for tissue fabrication was reported by Bertassoni et al [14]. The authors demonstrate a strategy for 3D bioprinting using a modified set-up that uses a photolabile cell-laden methacrylated gelatin as 'bioink' for fabrication of pre-polymerized hydrogel fibers. After assessing the effect of the biopolymer concentration and cell density on the fabrication process, the authors proved the ability of their method to fabricate and control macroscale architectures and to support the viability of the printed cells. A different strategy of 3D bioprinting involves the fabrication of 'scaffold-free' constructs using tissue spheroids as bioink. In this process, the basic building blocks of the tissue are spherical bodies composed of spontaneous self-assembled cells. Upon deposition in a pre-defined architecture, the spheroids fuse into a 3D tissue structure. In their paper, Tan et al [15] describe a technique for direct 3D mold printing for fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Using algorithm-directed deposition of alginate micro-droplets on a calcium-containing substrate, the group managed to construct hydrogels with defined 3D architecture. The resulting structure then served as a mold into which tissue spheroids were deposited and eventually fused together to form an artificial, tissue-like structure. The promising results from these three studies demonstrate the emerging role of 3D printing technology as an effective means of implementing the modular approach. By performing a precise, algorithm-guided deposition of cells and biomaterials, 'bottom-up' fabrication of composite constructs has become feasible. Whether the fabrication method of choice is based on the 'top-down' or 'bottom-up' approach, the subsequent step is usually an incubation period in a bioreactor to support the organization and maturation of the construct into a functioning tissue. In this issue Miklas et al [16] report on the development of a bioreactor that offers both mechanical and electrical stimuli to engineered cardiac tissues and allows the researcher to study the physiology of the patch by providing on-line measurements of contraction force. In summary, the articles in this special section demonstrate selected current advances in the fabrication of biomaterials in the context of tissue engineering. The recent achievements in this evolving, multidisciplinary field bring the scientific community another step toward the goal of faithfully imitating the fine and complex architecture of a functional human tissue. Finding the most appropriate cell source and engineering a thick, vascularized tissue are still a challenge. Nevertheless, the intense work and vast efforts that are being invested in research and development of artificial tissues for treatment of damaged or malfunctioning organs give hope to many patients that currently relay on organ transplantation from scarce donors. Acknowledgment TD acknowledges support from the European Union FP7 program (Marie Curie, CIG), Alon Fellowship, the Israeli Science Foundation and the Nicholas and Elizabeth Slezak Super Center for Cardiac Research and Biomedical Engineering at Tel Aviv University. DHK acknowledges support from the American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, Perkins Coie Award for Discovery and KSEA Young Investigator Award. Research reported in this publication was also supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R21 AR064395-01A1."

 http://1.usa.gov/1gQyFvM

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The Movement for Patient Access to Doctors’ Notes Is Growing

The Movement for Patient Access to Doctors’ Notes Is Growing | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ TTo level the playing field, some believe patients should be able to see what their doctor is writing about them. But note-sharing with mental health patients has been slower to develop. There’s a scene in the first season of comedian Louis C.K.’s FX series Louie where he tries to describe his feelings to his therapist. When he looks at his young daughter, he says, he often sees his mother. “So your mother, is she there?” asks the doctor. No, says the confused C.K, who expected the figurative nature of his statement to be obvious. He just “sees” her face. “Is she standing right in front of her?” the doctor asks. “Are you at your mother’s house?” C.K.’s standards for doctors might be questionable. But at the very least, the scene shows that understanding and communication between doctor and patient can always be helped along. The OpenNotes initiative, which seeks to enable easier access for patients to doctor’s notes, might have helped. The idea is that if doctor’s notes were more transparent, then a patient would become more involved in their own treatment. And the “playing field” between doctor and patient also is leveled somewhat. “We doctors hide from patients what we feel about them and what we think, and I think that it is a mistake,” said Tom Delbanco, professor of general medicine and primary care at Harvard Medical School. “There is absolutely no reason patients should not know what we are thinking about them and doing.” Delbanco said the use of OpenNotes—which he leads with Jan Walker, a registered nurse and researcher at Harvard Medical School—has grown from 13,500 patients to 3 million today. But note-sharing with patients with mental health problems has been slower to develop. Concerns exist over whether a patient’s mental condition could worsen after reading what a psychologist has written about them, or whether a patient could feel objectified and pathologized. “The instinct has been, ‘That’s different, mental health is different, don’t touch it’—I think that’s nonsense,” said Delbanco. “I think if you say you’re ill because your knee hurts, or I think you’re crazy because you think blue is green, you should be the first to know and my job would be to help you with that.” Patients participating in a pilot study at the Harvard Medical School teaching hospital Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center started note-sharing with their psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers in March this year. Because the pilot project is still in its infancy, the data aren’t there yet. But Delbanco predicts it will take off in the same way note-sharing with the earlier patients did. And it will go beyond the United States, he said. “The world is becoming more transparent. There are fewer secrets,” he said. “It really is an expression of that moving into medicine. I don’t see why this should be constrained by the Atlantic.” Outside the U.S., mental health-care professionals debate among themselves how much transparency can exist between themselves and patients. The discussion often is shaped by allegiances to particular schools of thought, such as Sigmund Freud’s concept of “therapeutic abstinence.” The idea that iron-clad barriers between therapist and patient must exist, and preclude such transparency, some would argue. Andreas Feher, a psychoanalyst and psychiatrist in private practice, said he has come up against this line of thinking many times in Germany. He doesn’t do note-sharing via a password-protected electronic patient portal but reads his notes from the previous session aloud to his patients. “My colleagues say, ‘Those are your notes, that is none of their business.’ They think I’m crazy—I don’t really understand it,” Feher said. “In any case, it isn’t really done here. I don’t know anyone who does it. But I don’t care, I do it anyway.” Asked why he did so if note-sharing was considered so unorthodox in Germany, he said it helped him remember what happened from sessions that could run up to two hours. In his experience, only about one in 15 patients ever has a problem with it, he said. Despite how useful he found note-sharing and how much patients seemed to like it, Feher said he was skeptical it would be widely adopted in the near future. “Here, the barriers are perceived so important,” he said. “I know therapists who won’t go to the cinema if they know a patient might be there.” To them, note-sharing involves breaking down barriers they don’t want broken down, Feher said. “ “It seems strange to me that other professionals—maybe those not even directly involved in the case—can potentially read some of these notes that the client can’t.” ” “It won’t happen in my lifetime,” he said. “It’s a shame. I would have found that good.” But cultural attitudes and prevailing schools of thought aren’t the only things tilting the debate. Bureaucratic challenges can sometimes play a role. In most countries—including the U.S., the U.K., and Germany—patients generally have a right to access their medical records. But requesting the notes that are part of the records is often a bureaucratic process, and the rules make it difficult for clinicians simply to offer to show their notes to patients, said David Harper, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of East London. “Most clinical psychologists work for the National Health Service (NHS). They are employees,” he said. “Therefore the notes you make don’t belong to you, technically, they belong to the secretary of state. As soon as you write them, they are NHS property.” Harper supports transparency as the default setting, he said. “In the U.K., care records are increasingly stored electronically, with different professionals able to read anyone’s notes,” he said. “It seems strange to me that other professionals—maybe those not even directly involved in the case—can potentially read some of these notes that the client can’t.” But of course, any sharing with mental health patients needs to be done carefully, he said. “If someone is feeling fairly stable mentally, and resilient, then they could read lots of different things and be OK with them,” said Harper. “But if they were feeling very vulnerable, there were some elements in the notes that might make them feel more vulnerable.” Charlotte Marshall, a privately practicing clinical psychologist in Adelaide, South Australia echoed Harper. Sharing notes could be “counterproductive” in situations where a client has symptoms of paranoia and plans of action and safety concerns are written in them, she said. “The clinical setting in which note-sharing is hypothetically occurring is important. For instance, notes taken in an inpatient psychiatric setting where [the client] might be detained would be quite different to notes from a private practitioner’s session on a client with an anxiety disorder,” she said. For her personal practice, she said she didn’t see the need to share her notes “as a matter of course” and that it wasn’t common practice in Australia. She does, however, generally tell her clients they are welcome to her notes any time, she noted. “But in my years of experience, nobody ever expressed particular interest,” she said. “I try to be as transparent as possible on my thoughts as to her thoughts on what may be going on with them. What is in my notes is unlikely to be of concern or surprise to my clients, so perhaps they don’t feel the need to see my notes.” Marshall said she didn’t think note-sharing was becoming the norm in Australia—and how it will fare in the rest of the world is not yet clear. However, Delbanco said the experiences of the original project have left him optimistic the movement will be taken up across the board. ”“If you had told me that we would go from 20,000 to 3 million note-sharing Americans in 18 months, I would have thought you were smoking marijuana,” he said. “But it happened. Mental health notes will spread just as rapidly because it is riding on the wave of transparency. This is a global phenomenon.” “ .”
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Convert waste CO2 and chicken feathers into fertiliser - environment - 05 June 2014 - New Scientist

Convert waste CO2 and chicken feathers into fertiliser - environment - 05 June 2014 - New Scientist | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Chicken feathers and carbon dioxide: we've got too much of both, but cook them together and you get some surprisingly useful products”
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Forehead and fingertips most sensitive to pain, research shows

Forehead and fingertips most sensitive to pain, research shows | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ University College London scientists produce the first map showing how the ability to feel pain varies across the body”The forehead and fingertips are the most sensitive parts to pain, according to the first map created by scientists of how the ability to feel pain varies across the human body. It is hoped that the study, in which volunteers had pain inflicted without touching them, could help the estimated 10 million people in the UK who suffer from chronic pain by allowing physicians to use lasers to monitor nerve damage across the body. This would offer a quantitative way to monitor the progression or regression of a condition. Lead author Dr Flavia Mancini, of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, said: "Acuity for touch has been known for more than a century, and tested daily in neurology to assess the state of sensory nerves on the body. It is striking that until now nobody had done the same for pain." In the study, a pair of lasers were used to cause brief sensation of pinprick pain to 26 blindfolded healthy volunteers on various parts of their body without any touch, in order to define our ability to identify where it hurts, known as "spatial acuity". Sometimes only one laser would be activated, and sometimes both. The participants were asked whether they felt one sting or two, at varying distances between the two beams and researchers recorded the minimum distance between the beams at which people were able to accurately say whether it was one sting or two. "This measure tells us how precisely people can locate the source of pain on different parts of their body," said senior author Dr Giandomenico Iannetti, of the UCL department of neuroscience, physiology and pharmacology. "Touch and pain are mediated by different sensory systems."
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Engineers invent a way to beam power to medical chips deep inside the body

Engineers invent a way to beam power to medical chips deep inside the body | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical devices such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators, or new sensors and gadgets yet to be developed.”
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One in three 'on cusp' of diabetes

One in three 'on cusp' of diabetes | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, June 10, 8:38 AM

Risk of diabetes is greater than first estimated

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Implant means end of reading glasses is in sight - Telegraph

Implant means end of reading glasses is in sight - Telegraph | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a tiny implant, no bigger than a pinhead, which sits inside the cornea and slightly increases its curvature, to allow the eye to focus again
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DEVELOP3D blog - Shoes not helping you to win the Tour de France? Make your own like Hanseeno

DEVELOP3D blog - Shoes not helping you to win the Tour de France? Make your own like Hanseeno | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
When pro cyclist Adam Hansen favoured shoes were discontinued he made his own, and an entire brand to…
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Medication management goes digital

Medication management goes digital | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Medication management for patients, as well as their physicians and pharmacists, is going digital.

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John Lemos Forman's curator insight, August 11, 3:19 PM

São inúmeras as possibilidades de uso das TICs em benefício tanto dos pacientes como dos gestores das unidades de saúde.

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Out of the Dark: restoring furniture and direction to troubled teenagers - video

Out of the Dark: restoring furniture and direction to troubled teenagers - video | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
A thriving project helps restore and upcycle discarded furniture for leading designers and design fairs
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How mobile became mighty in healthcare

How mobile became mighty in healthcare | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Chris Duffey and Katie Erbs on 10 powerful trends emerging in mobile health for patients, professionals and providers
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The importance of humanising healthcare Technology

The importance of humanising healthcare Technology | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
"Technology has seriously upped the ante when it comes to enabling patients to be informed and educated about their health. There are more than70,000 websites that disseminate health information. As exciting as this may sound, access to the general public is often hindered by design issues (poor navigation, writing at graduate level, and disorganization) and questionable quality and accuracy of information. We can do better."
Via Andrew Spong, Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Chaturika Jayadewa
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A Container That Also Assembles Its Own Contents

A Container That Also Assembles Its Own Contents | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“The cup above may look like just an empty container, but it's actually much more.”
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A nice, bright smile: Scientists use lasers to regrow teeth

A nice, bright smile: Scientists use lasers to regrow teeth | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have come up with a bright idea - literally - to repair teeth. And they say their concept - using laser light to entice the body's own stem cells into action - may offer enormous promise beyond just dentistry in the field of regenerative medicine. The researchers used a low-power laser to coax dental stem cells to form dentin, the hard tissue similar to bone that makes up most of a tooth, demonstrating the process in studies involving rats and mice and using human cells in a laboratory. They did not regenerate an entire tooth in part because the enamel part was too tricky. But merely getting dentin to grow could help alleviate the need for root canal treatment, the painful procedure to remove dead or dying nerve tissue and bacteria from inside a tooth, they said. "I'm a dentist by training. So I think it has potential for great impact in clinical dentistry," researcher Praveen Arany of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, said on Friday. ”Arany expressed hope that human clinical trials could get approval in the near future.
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Morality pills: reality or science fiction?

Morality pills: reality or science fiction? | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Molly Crockett: The complexities of ethics and the brain make it difficult for scientists to develop a pill to enhance human morals. Could we create a "morality pill"? Once the stuff of science fiction, recent studies in neuroscience have shown that brain chemicals can subtly influence some aspects of moral judgments and decisions. However, science is very far from creating pills that can turn sinners into saints, as I have argued many times before. So imagine my surprise when I came across the headline, “‘Morality Pills’ Close to Reality, Claims Scientist”– referring to a lecture I gave recently in London. (I asked the newspaper where the reporter got his misinformation, but received no response to my query.) Sensationalist reports like this are not only inaccurate, but also neglect the rich complexities of the brain that make neuroscience so fascinating. It is these same complexities that will make it very difficult for scientists to develop a morality pill. First, let’s consider the evidence that drugs can influence morals. Laboratory studies typically compare the effects of a placebo pill with those of a drug treatment that alters the function of a specific brain chemical. After taking either the drug or placebo, healthy volunteers make a series of moral decisions or judgments. For example, they may consider whether to donate to charity, or cooperate with others, or judge whether it is permissible to harm one person in order to save many others. The key question is whether the drug alters people’s decisions and judgments, relative to placebo.
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Fasting for three days renews entire immune system, protects cancer patients, 'remarkable' new study finds

Fasting for three days renews entire immune system, protects cancer patients, 'remarkable' new study finds | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Fasting for three days can regenerate the entire immune system, even in the elderly, scientists have found in a breakthrough described as “remarkable". Although fasting diets have been criticized by nutritionists, research suggests that starving the body kick-starts stem cells into producing more white blood cells, which fight off infection. Scientists at the University of Southern California (USC) say the discovery could be particularly beneficial for those suffering from damaged immune systems, such as cancer patients on chemotherapy. It could also help the elderly whose immune systems become less effective.
Via PAT NOVAK
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Ellen Diane's comment, July 2, 6:52 AM
eric- I am a not computer saavy fitness trainer-I can't even cut&paste;(((:)
Eric Chan Wei Chiang's comment, July 2, 10:59 AM
@Ellen Diane, be that as it may, you are an excellent curator. How did you get so many views? I really have a lot to learn about content curation.
Ellen Diane's comment, July 2, 12:02 PM
thanks my new twitter friend- Basically I have no idea what # of views means- whether I am doing well. I am sharing what resonates. Mosty fitness, music, nutrition- again, thanks for your kindness Eric;)
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Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video)

Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video) | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
All grit, no fluff. One of the best digital healthcare surveys I've seen from the University of Oxford's Lionel Tarrasenko. Note the emphasis on non-invasive sensors in digital health and data fusion in analytics. If you only watch one digital health video this year, make it this one.
Via Andrew Spong
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Synthetic Biology - Welcome to the 21st Century!

Synthetic Biology - Welcome to the 21st Century! | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ While there are active members of the U.S. House Science Committee that openly deny evolution and climate change, we are fortunate that there are others in the world that realize it is the 21st cen...”
Via Beste Ozcan
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