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Advancing the Future of Healthcare: frog’s Connected Care Solution

Advancing the Future of Healthcare: frog’s Connected Care Solution | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
As technology disrupts established healthcare systems and the traditional patient-provider dynamic, frog introduces a prototype Connected Care Solution (CCS) that seamlessly connects doctors and patients and supportive communities.

 

 

via @digitag

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Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence

Benjamin Gaulon: Hacking (and recycling) the culture of obsolescence | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
What happens in a technological context where a device becomes obsolete within a very short time? This is central themes of the study carried out by the artist and researcher Benjamin Gaulon

Via Marco Mancuso, arslog
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Marco Mancuso's curator insight, November 20, 10:08 AM

Benjamin Gaulon is an artist, researcher, internationally known for his détournement, hacking, recycling and critical making practices. Founder at Recyclism Hacklab and author of the essay "Hardware hacking and recycling strategies in an age of technological obsolescence". Filippo Lorenzin had an interview with him for Digicult

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What do patients want most from health apps? Here are 10 answers

What do patients want most from health apps? Here are 10 answers | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

Via Andrew Spong
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Andrew Spong's curator insight, November 14, 4:53 AM

The thing that stands out for me here: patients want disease information and practical support, yet developers (and their sponsors) are more likely to publish trackers and diaries, which only make it to third place.

 

I know some interesting integrated solutions which attempt to hit a number of the targets in this chart are on the way, but if this PatientView data tells us anything, it is that 'single solution' apps aren't of a great deal of interest to patients -- unless, perhaps, they focus on disease information.

 

 

 

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Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support

Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Microsoft has been winning generally approving headlines for its Microsoft Band fitness tracker and accompanying Microsoft Health platform, since both were revealed – seemingly unintentionally at first – on Wednesday.One of the key points about both hardware and software is their cross-platform nature: they won’t just be restricted to people with a Windows Phone smartphone and/or a computer running the Windows OS. They’ll also support Android, iOS and Mac.Microsoft Health is also open to other devices and apps, with Jawbone’s Up and the apps MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal and RunKeeper the first to be announced.
Via Alex Butler
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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 9:19 AM

“We plan to have a regular cadence of Microsoft Health announcements including additional device and service partnerships, SDK availability and additional cross-platform applications and services,” blogged Microsoft’s Todd Holmdahl.

Bart Collet's comment, October 31, 12:23 PM
true! aggregate or die!
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Should we diagnose rare diseases with smartphones?

Should we diagnose rare diseases with smartphones? | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
An object in your pocket could help diagnose rare diseases like Ebola, finds David Robson – and one day it might even replace the doctor’s surgery too.As fear of the Ebola virus escalates, Eric Topol thinks that we’re missing an important weapon. And you just need to reach into your pocket to find it. “Most communicable diseases can be diagnosed with a smartphone,” he says. “Rather than putting people into quarantine for three weeks – how about seeing if they harbour it in their blood?” A quicker response could also help prevent mistakes, such as the patient in Dallas who was sent home from hospital with a high fever, only to later die from the infection.It’s a provocative claim, but Topol is not shy about calling for a revolution in the way we deal with Ebola – or any other health issue for that matter. A professor of genomics at the Scripps Research Institute in California, his last book heralded “the creative destruction of medicine” through new technology. Smartphones are already helping to do away with many of the least pleasant aspects of sickness – including the long hospital visits and agonising wait for treatment. An easier way to diagnose Ebola is just one example of these sweeping changes.So far, however, few doctors have embraced these possibilities. “The medical cocoon has not allowed a digital invasion,” says Topol, “while the rest of the world has already assimilated the digital revolution into its day-to-day life.” That’s not due to lack of demand: many patients are already monitoring their health through their phone, with apps that check your skin for cancer from a selfie, for example. These programs are not alwaysdesigned with the accuracy most doctors would require, however – and some fear that by missing a diagnosis and offering a false sense of security, they could cost lives. “The slower the healthcare system is in exploring these things, the more people are at risk by doing the exploration on their own,” says Estrin.
more at : http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20141017-the-ebola-detector-in-your-pocket
Via nrip
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nrip's curator insight, October 17, 4:35 PM

My associates and I have built a mobile Ebola diagnosis and data collection prototype. If interested in exploring possible uses of the same for your organization, please drop me a message.

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Empathic Design or How to Put the Experience Above All Else - Michael Ventura, Sub Rosa - YouTube

Empathic Design or How to Put the Experience Above All Else - Michael Ventura, Sub Rosa - YouTube | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Princeton University Lecture - October 9, 2014 - The Keller Center welcomed Michael Ventura, Founder and CEO of strategy-led design and innovation practice, ...
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The war on waste: can material innovation save the world? - live chat

The war on waste: can material innovation save the world? - live chat | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Join the experts for a live chat on Friday 14 November 1-2pm GMT to discuss how to place sustainability front and centre of design innovation
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There Is No ‘Healthy’ Microbiome

There Is No ‘Healthy’ Microbiome | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

IN the late 17th century, the Dutch naturalist Anton van Leeuwenhoek looked at his own dental plaque through a microscope and saw a world of tiny cells “very prettily a-moving.” He could not have predicted that a few centuries later, the trillions of microbes that share our lives — collectively known as the microbiome — would rank among the hottest areas of biology.

These microscopic partners help us by digesting our food, training our immune systems and crowding out other harmful microbes that could cause disease. In return, everything from the food we eat to the medicines we take can shape our microbial communities — with important implications for our health. Studies have found that changes in our microbiome accompany medical problems from obesity to diabetes to colon cancer.


Via Complexity Digest, Flora Moon
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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, November 10, 6:14 AM

The fascinating world of the microbiome and the opportunities it heralds for future medicine

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, November 12, 3:45 AM

Our microbes are truly part of us, and just as we are vast in our variety, so, too, are they. We must embrace this complexity if we hope to benefit from it.

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A Time Machine For Smells

A Time Machine For Smells | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

 

Smells are deeply evocative. They can conjure up memories that are years or even decades old. In this spirit, one recent design school graduate is attempting to harness the power of scent to create a time machine.

 


Via Peter Verschuere
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Mind-reading device invented by scientists to eavesdrop on 'inner voice'

Mind-reading device invented by scientists to eavesdrop on 'inner voice' | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Scientists at the University of California were able to pick up several words that subjects thought using a new mind-reading device”
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What medtech can learn from digital health

What medtech can learn from digital health | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ SAN FRANCISCO -- Big medical technology companies have the trust of hospitals. But digital-health startups are the ones developing the most exciting new technologies. Given partnerships and acquisi...”
Via Chad Johnson
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Wow of the week: Olfactory nerve cells help paralyzed man to walk

Wow of the week: Olfactory nerve cells help paralyzed man to walk | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Derek Fidyka who became paralyzed after a knife severed his spinal cord is learning to walk again thanks to a surgery involving implanted olfactory nerve cells.
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Human-centered design - Design Kit - Empathy by Emi Kolawole

Human-centered design - Design Kit - Empathy by Emi Kolawole | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“I can’t come up with any new ideas if all I do is exist in my own life.”

 

Empathy is the capacity to step into other people’s shoes, to understand their lives, and start to solve problems from their perspectives. Human-centered design is premised on empathy, on the idea that the people you’re designing for are your roadmap to innovative solutions.

 

All you have to do empathize, understand them, and bring them along with you in the design process.

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Customer Empathy - ignore it at your peril!

Customer Empathy - ignore it at your peril! | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

Have you ever looked up the definition of the word Empathy?

 

I would suspect that you have not! It is not often that we take the time to read dictionaries!! If you read the definition above, it is also likely that you will find it difficult to correlate many of the words used with organisations that you interact with on a daily basis. I often tell people how rare I think it is for companies to demonstrate ‘customer empathy’ on a consistent basis. There are many reasons why this is the case – organisational culture being the predominant one.

 

by IJGOLDING

Customer empathy is a critical element that will have a significant effect on the experience customers have with a business. 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Empathize and Prototype: A Hands On Dive into the Key Tools of Design Thinking, Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate

Empathize and Prototype: A Hands On Dive into the Key Tools of Design Thinking, Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Move beyond theory and dive into hands-on practice in the art of innovation. Tackle innovation challenges from start to finish and gain an in-depth understanding of these key tenets of design thinking and how to incorporate them into your work. ”Empathize with your customer, synthesize your learnings, and rapidly prototype and test your new ideas. Master techniques for gaining empathy with customers and immediately put them to use in a series of hands on exercises that guide you from synthesis to prototyping and testing.Learn How To:“ - Engage customers to forge deep connections and gain valuable consumer insights - Synthesize findings into a compelling problem statement - Prototype concepts in a low-cost manner - Rapidly test concepts with end users to gain insights about solutions and user needs and reduce your time to market”
Via Edwin Rutsch
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Sensors And Sensitivity

Sensors And Sensitivity | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
This is the sensible trajectory of connected sensor technology. The world around us gains the ability to perceive us, rather than wearable sensors trying to figure out what’s going on in our environment by taking a continuous measure of us.
Via Alex Butler
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Rowan Norrie's curator insight, August 5, 9:13 AM

A useful lesson - wearables should not just be about harvesting data for the sake of it. By incorporating into objects we are in contact with, e.g. seat belts, we can make it a seamless part of our everyday life to gather information when it really matters.

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10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever

10 Ideas That Are About To Change Medicine Forever | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
The future of medicine has arrived.No, we're not talking about robot surgeons, implantable memory-augmentation devices, or doctors wearing Google Glass. The game-changing innovations on this list are more than distant dreams or inventions no one really knows what to with yet. Most should be available as early as 2015.Every year, the Cleveland Clinic comes up with a list of new devices or treatments that are expected to help improve our daily lives and reduce our risks of developing disease. Only time will tell whether their considerable promise pans out.Here are the top 10 new medications, treatments, and technologies to watch for in 2015, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
Via Alex Butler
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Kim Kubiak's curator insight, November 6, 11:24 AM

My favorites are #9 and #1.

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This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED

This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“ Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers.”
Via dagautier, dbtmobile
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dagautier's curator insight, November 12, 8:17 AM

"Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers."

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Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast

Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
“Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve...”
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Empathy and Design: What You Should Consider | Design Shack

Empathy and Design: What You Should Consider | Design Shack | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Do you need to think about empathy when you design? (The answer is yes.) It may seem like a pretty common sense answer, but too often we get caught up in the design and message and not the user.Who are you creating the design for? How will they connect with it? That’s where empathy comes in.Thinking about it from the start of the process can help you put together an even more successful project. (As you read through this post, look at the examples and think about the emotions these sites make you feel.)by Carrie Cousins
Via Edwin Rutsch
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Beat the Microbead - Beat the Microbead

Beat the Microbead - Beat the Microbead | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
Beat the microbead is an international campaign against plastic microbeads in cosmetics.
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Google is developing a cancer and heart attack-detecting pill

Google is developing a cancer and heart attack-detecting pill | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
New ‘nanoparticle’ pill could detect signs of disease before it becomes a problem for pre-emptive treatment, monitored by a wrist-worn device. By Samuel Gibbs

Via Wildcat2030
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Extremely stretchable hydrogels may be used in artificial muscles

Extremely stretchable hydrogels may be used in artificial muscles | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Hydrogels can reversibly change their size and shape under different conditions. This property makes them attractive for a wide variety of applications, including artificial muscles, drug delivery, and sensors. But even though stimuli-sensitive hydrogels have been studied for a few decades, ...
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'Starfish' crystals could lead to 3D-printed pills - Futurity

'Starfish' crystals could lead to 3D-printed pills - Futurity | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
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Socrates Logos's curator insight, October 27, 7:31 PM

*‘STARFISH’ CRYSTALS COULD LEAD TO 3D-PRINTED PILLS*

by
Nicole Casal Moore-Michigan 

"Engineers have figured out how to make rounded crystals with no facets, a design that mimics the hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells.

The discovery could one day lead to 3D-printed medications that absorb better into the body.
Both the crystals’ shape and the way they’re made—using organic vapor jet printing—have other promising applications, researchers say. The geometry could potentially be useful to guide light in advanced LEDs, solar cells, and nonreflective surfaces...."


 http://bit.ly/1tdFCve

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OriMetric – new rubber origami driven material exploration // by Mads Hansen

OriMetric – new rubber origami driven material exploration // by Mads Hansen | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
  By successfully blending old with new, Danish Designer Mads Jeppe Hansen, has found great inspiration in the art of traditional Japanese paper origami when developing and creating a new clas...
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This column will change your life: empathy

This column will change your life: empathy | shubush design & wellbeing | Scoop.it
What the world really needs, according to the Yale psychologist Paul Bloom, is a bit less empathy.

 

Yes, I know how that sounds. So does he: "Like announcing that you hate kittens," as he put it recently in the Boston Review. In a world clearly suffering from what Barack Obama calls the "empathy deficit", it seems that he's being obnoxiously counterintuitive for the sake of it.

 

Research suggests that empathetic people are more altruistic; higher empathy is associated with better relationships.

 

Roman Krznaric, author of the recent book Empathy (he's in favour of it), thinks that "outrospection" – the deliberate effort to seek out other people's experiences – might help solve everything from inequality to climate change.  

 

by Oliver Burkeman


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