Shelby's Geograph...
Follow
Find
38 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
onto Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio
Scoop.it!

The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:51 PM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.

Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

more...
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, May 8, 2013 1:58 PM

Very interesting view of the forces of erosion. This would make a good addition to any science discussion that covers erosion and the forces of nature on the land.

Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 5:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:30 PM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

The first time I saw this, my jaw dropped. The fact that this city is so used to just setting up market around when a train comes right through the middle of it is just crazy. But this just shows how this overpopulated city has had to adjust. To them, moving their market to fit the train schedule is a part if everyday life in this "megacity". Living in an urban city like this one is what these people are used to, and this type of market is how they remain sustainable. 

more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:38 AM

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 3:04 PM

I love this video. Never think that the "third world" is not more dynamic and innovative than the first!

Jeffrey Ing's curator insight, August 13, 2:12 AM

people are not giving up with inflated price of urban land. They adapt and live with it :)

 

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from MOVIES VIDEOS & PICS
Scoop.it!

Allied Planes Looked Pretty Fabulous on D-Day Thanks to Invasion Paint - Fact Fiend

Allied Planes Looked Pretty Fabulous on D-Day Thanks to Invasion Paint - Fact Fiend | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
The allies had to use something known as "invasion paint" to avoid shooting each other on D-Day, history is awesome!

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Shelby Porter's insight:

I never would have imagined that our veterans would have a problem identifying which planes to shoot at, but i guess painting stripes on their planes was a good idea! Tactics for battle during WWII are very interesting and this is something I had never heard of before. I have seen stripes on some planes from the past, but I always thought they were merely decoration or to show patriotism. Who knew they were there for battle purposes? 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Breakfasts Around the World


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

more...
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 11, 2013 12:01 PM

Looks lke all of these are in some way combined to be an American breakfast.  Since this country is a melting pot you mihgt just get a mix of breakfast foods from different cultures in one American breakfast.  You can have have the English eggs, over easy it looks like, with a French pastries.  A full mix of culture and you might still me in pj's.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 6:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:10 PM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

A very insightful video into the organic farming movement. Chipotle is taking a leap into spreading the word about this, and personally I find it enlightening. It is nice to see such a widely known restaurant take in interest in the food they serve and it makes it seem like they care about their customers. When you eat at Chiptole, you know what you are eating, but with other fast food places you can't be sure exactly what went into making that hamburger. They want people to see that they can get organic food made fast and it still tastes good. Chipotle is starting a consumption cultural revolution. 

more...
Juan Daniel Castillo's curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:11 AM

To meditate

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:57 AM

This video, although it is a Chipotle Grill advertisment, does make a clear point. The industrialization of agriculture has made our food unhealthy and has taken away jobs from the farmer. Although we are a highly industrialized and developed nation today, it is still necessary for our necessary food to be naturally grown on farms rather than in factories where it was not meant to be grown. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:13 PM

What this commercial is trying to make aware is that there are ethics involved in agriculture. What the organic farming movement is all about is providing good for people that is produced fresh and no harm is done to the animals or environment .

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:51 PM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Chipotle's Gamble

"Watch The Scarecrow, the companion film for Chipotle's new app-based game. Then download the free app at www.scarecrowgame.com and join the quest for whole sustainable food."


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

This video probably set some of the leading fast food chains and restuarants on edge. Chipotle is starting an organic agricultural revolution, and with good reason. Most fast food cooperations are like the scare crow foods in the video, not using one hundred percent animal products, and using chemicals to enhance them. It is like that in other places too. Mnay farmers now are breeding chickens to have much larger breasts because that is what is in demand. But none of this is good for our bodies. Chipotle is one of many organic companies trying to go back to the basics and feed us food that is also good for us. They are showing us that this agricultural revolution can feed the people of the world. 

more...
soniarathod's curator insight, October 3, 2013 9:57 PM

Just love it

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:48 AM

Sounds good. I liked the video I saw.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:27 PM

If the Owners of Chipotle are actually growing and raising their animals organically they have no choice but to approach their competitors aggressively.  Growing high volume quality food is a much more expensive and slow process then genetically modifying animals to create higher yields. I thought the commercial was beautifully done and struck a tone I wish I heard more often. 

Scooped by Shelby Porter
Scoop.it!

Boy, 9, Boards Plane to Las Vegas Without Ticket

Boy, 9, Boards Plane to Las Vegas Without Ticket | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
A nine-year-old boy managed to pass through a security checkpoint at a Minnesota airport and hop on a flight to Las Vegas without a boarding pass, authorities said.
Shelby Porter's insight:

This is scary to think that this boy went unnoticed until they were in the air on their way to their destination. It makes you wonder what else airport officials have missed. Hopefully after this incident, crew memebers and security personal will keep a closer watch. And hopefully, this boy is not traumatized by the whole event. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from D Business
Scoop.it!

Muslim population growth faster than global rate

Muslim population growth faster than global rate | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
70% of global population growth over the next 30 years will be in Muslim countries

Via @NewDayStarts, Donald Dane
Shelby Porter's insight:

Interesting to think about. I never would have expected to see this number. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelby Porter
Scoop.it!

Empowering Women, Developing Society: Female Education in the Middle East and North Africa

While access to education for females has improved dramatically over the past few decades in the Middle East, many are still excluded. Education helps women prepare for the labor force and helps them understand their legal and reproductive rights.
Shelby Porter's insight:

Education of women in the middle east.

more...
Taylor Ferguson's curator insight, May 1, 8:34 AM

This article was important because of the concentration of the education of younger girls in LDCs. Like in "Half the Sky" many Aid group made efforts to donate to schools that educated girls in hope of keeping them enrolled for a longer amount of time.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from RI Geography
Scoop.it!

Popular Baby Name

Popular Baby Name | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it

"MAPS: Here's the Most Popular Baby Name in Each State. By Business Insider. |. Posted Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at 2:15 PM."


Via Seth Dixon, Jose Rojas
Shelby Porter's insight:

Very interesting way to look at which names have become popular and where. I never would have guessed that there would be such a difference between the north and south, the east and west, or the more populated states versus the larger in land. I guess place and space even effect how names are picked. It would be interesting to see the map for previous years and compare. I would also be curious to see the map of the year I was born. 

more...
Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:53 PM

Population..... all the babies being born...... popular girls' names!

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 2:11 PM

There are so many options when it comes to naming your son or daughter. As years go by, trends can be seen in the naming process according to regions. Names that were popular in the early 90s are less popular as names such as Olivia, Ava, Liam and Mason begin to become the most popularist. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 8:41 AM

This chloropleth map shows the most popular female baby names of 2012 by state and can also reveal regional connections and the movement of common ideals. 

While the major regions of similarity (Mid-West and West Coast) of course are similar and show cultural connections, other states outside of these regions (yet have the same baby name) show connections that could have come from the movement of people and ideas from the other regions.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

My escape from North Korea

"As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was 'the best on the planet.' It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 27, 2013 6:48 AM

We've been studying North Korea and the conflict between North and South in our World Geography classes.  This is an interesting perspective and story - one that definitely helps to understand the plight of many North Koreans as they struggle to leave and subsequently create new lives elsewhere.

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 23, 2013 5:53 PM

A sad but also inspiring story and an enlightening video. I see a lot of people who assume that the North Korean government and the people are one and the same, and that is not the case. It is important to realise the harsh conditions of people living in North Korea to fully understand what is happening in that part of the world. It is hard for people to leave their country and their home, but as Hyeonseo Lee explains, sometimes there is no choice.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:22 PM

A very powerful and informaitivie dipiction of life as you girl for Lee, and her stuggle to get a away. Her story is increadible, I cant even begin to imaigian all that she has been thouhg sence her escape. This story reminds me alot of life how life for jews was during and the hollocust, and how the need to escape your own country became a need to survive. The fact that Lee has remained safe and is able to come out and share her story is inspiring.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

more...
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 11, 2012 7:02 PM
Food is often as distinct and diverse as the cultures they come from. The diffusion of foreign food in international cities (which are becoming places of ever increasing diversity) such as Berlin, is very symbolic of the growing presence of globalization around the world and its impact on culture.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:23 AM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Living Bridge

In North East India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya. 

 

This is an astounding video that shows a (literally) natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  The living bridges are truly a sight to behold. 

 

Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenous.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

An amazing use of the surroundings these people have! These people have been dealt a hand that may seem hard to deal with, but they have figured out a way to adapt and work with and use the environment instead of trying to go around it. To avoid building a new bridge every year because of the monsoons, this man has worked with nature to build something incredible and sustainble. He is not afraid of the weather any longer, he actually seeks its help in the aide of his growing bridge. This truely is an amazing sight to see!

more...
megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:38 AM

This video is so cool. It shows the indigenous people using the enviroment to the fullest. THese resourceful people do not even kill the tree when they use it to build the living bridges to cross over the rough waters. They actually have a community of living bridges that help the people to get from point a to point b safely. They keep the bridges alives by intertwinning them with one another to hold them up across the water. THe video itself is too cool, especially that people even thought of this!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:16 PM

This is so, so awesome.  These people have suffered at the hands of nature for generations and now they have figured out how to use nature to solve the problem.  They have constructed bridges with trees that takes hundreds of years to fully form so they pass it through their family generations to make life easier.  India endures a harrowing monsoon season with many floods and landslides every year and these bridges will help the people to carry on with their lives above the river's reach. These people indigeous to the region deserve so much credit for the innovative ways they have discovered to deal with nature in it's angriest forms.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 8:01 PM

This video shows how innovative people can be due to physical geography. In Northeast India, monsoon season creates raging rivers and floods which destroy the banks and wash away any normal bridges. The people of the Meghalaya province have devised a creative solution which solves both problems. By planting strangling fig plants, the roots reinforce the river banks and are then coaxed across the river creating a living bridge which can last for centuries.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

This is very difficult to watch. Being a female myself and also having six sisters (no brothers), I feel priviledged to be born outside these countries and not experience that gender bias. I personally couldn't imagine having to kill a child because it was female, if that was the case then my parents would be left with no children. I know that this culture has been imbedded in their heads, but I would like to ask these people if there has ever a point in their life when they just stop and wonder why things are like this? And with so many girls "disappearing" every year, I would like to imagine that at some point the United Nations or someone will eventually step in and try to fix some of these problems. I am not sure at this point if the gender bias will ever see an end in certain cultures, but I would hope that one day we can solve the issue of killing innocent babies based on their gender. By doing this, yes they are controlling the population in some places, but they are also wiping out a valuable/potentail member of the labor force. Maybe that could be relevent to why some of these countries are not remaining sustainable? Just a thought to ponder. 

more...
Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 5:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 7:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from iMOVIEi - MOVIES ・LOCATIONS・BUSINESSES・PEOPLE
Scoop.it!

I Wish these Buildings were Photoshopped, But They’re Not

I Wish these Buildings were Photoshopped, But They’re Not | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it

There’s a cloning tool in Photoshop that would probably be great for creating the illusion of monstrously repetitive high-rises in a mythical megacity. Unfortunately, that tool was notused in this series of images captured by German photographer Michael Wolf in Hong Kong.

 

“Architecture of Density” is a fascinating and haunting study of the tremendous density that can be found in most major Chinese cities. Wolf crops the sky and the land out of his shot to create a natural illusion of unlimited size that captures the experience of being in a megacity. “You have no idea how big the building is. It could be 100 stories or 200 stories, it could be a mile long,” says Wolf in an interview with the New Republic.

 

 


Via iMOVIEi
Shelby Porter's insight:

These apartments in Hong Kong do look photoshopped because  they are exactly alike. It is hard to imagine people living in such a small amount of space. With such little living space, I can imagine the hard life they must live eveeryday, trying to find the best ways to use what little space they have. And if there were ever a natural disaster that hit this building, the death toll would be huge. I know Hong Kong is highly populated and needs places like this to house alot of people, but i do not think this is the best or safest way to do so.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Is Geocaching?

Learn about the high-tech treasure hunting game being played around the world by adventure seekers! Learn more at http://www.geocaching.com Subscribe to this...

 

Geocaching is great way to get people outdoors, use geospatial technologies and have fun with the whole family. 

 

Tags: GPS, edtech, geospatial, technology, location.


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

I have tried geocaching and it really does make you use geospatial tools. You have to know exactly where you are in reference to a map, you have to know directions in which you must travel, and you know you have to reach a certain place. While a fun activity, it is also a great geographic learning tool. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat

"Pink Slime" - Mechanically Separated Meat | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it

McDonald's, Burger King, and Taco Bell all agreed last week to promise to stop using ammonia-treated meat as more and more people learn that this "pink slime" is an earlier version of their finished product.  This meat has been treated with Ammonium Hydroxide, is no longer good enough for our fast food restaurants—but it IS still good enough for our schools (they don't need a PR slogan to sell).


Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

This is disgusting. I do not understand how our culture has allowed us to accept the fact that this is considered food. This is barely meat anymore, and the fact that fast food chains have stopped using ammonia-treated meat but our schools still do is a serious problem. This obviously isn't healthy and with schools so concered with an obesity epidemic, maybe they should focus more on what they are feeding their students than adding more physical education classes. 

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:57 PM

That is gross how people eat that. it is amazing how people are blind to what they eat like this pink slime all these fast food chains are accused of selling to consumers. Now I have avoided eating at those places because of this. Now I eat out at Chipotle or Wendy’s or little local food businesses.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 9:56 AM

Even though this article was published last year, It is still a serious issue with the meat supply in North America. As discussed in class, only 2% of the work force is involved with agriculture. One of the primary reasons for migrating on the East coast, and Middle of the country, was because of its climate and soil, perfect for growing crops. Over the years our country has taken a serious turn with our food. We are trying to produce more food per worker and square foot of land and its only hurting us. This pink slime, ammonia-treated meat is treated in the first place so it kills any trace of ecoli. Which comes from cattle eating too much corn, which is what the cows in the country are fed, when their bodies are designed to eat grass, not corn. However, the US has lots of corn and so here raises a question, do we take care of our animals, give them enough grass to eat and sell Americans healthy beef? The answer is no, our food supply is a corporation burgers have to be sold and therefore the issue contines... 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 9:31 AM

I feel, generally speaking, that this is a result of our over-consumption of meat. If there wasn't such a high demand for meat these companies might not be looking into these sorts of alternative uses for these meat-like byproducts. The secondary reason for this is the negligence of personal accountability by officials and high paid USDA administrators that lack empathy and understanding of nutrition.

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

more...
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 1:35 PM
It is somewhat erroneous that McDonald’s wants to redo their packaging to emphasize on fresh material. First off, I worked in fast food and I can tell you while some things are freshly cut and grown, many aren’t. McDonalds actually doesn’t even cut their own onions like Burger King, they receive them dehydrated and they have to reconstitute them every morning. To me that is just gross. It is crazy to think that this new push for nutrition will actually convince people that what they are eating is healthy, its jut crazy. Just because my fry carton has a potato on it does not mean that I am going to consider that equal to a baked potato I eat at home. I agree with David, just because the packaging shows fresh food does not mean that what you’re getting is fresh just like how Mary said that the food by the time its shipped over is not fresh anymore.
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 6:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:42 PM

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

It is great that this cheap food has become a staple in poor places and are relieving people of starving, even if it is not the most nutricious meal out there. They way I see it is, if people spend so little on these noodles, maybe they will have saved some money and be able to buy fruits and vegetables. But even if they don't, the noodles are a meal that is quick, easy, and inexpensive and it is saving people from dying from starvation all while being more tasty than some of the other options. 

more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:10 AM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 12:12 PM

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

Scooped by Shelby Porter
Scoop.it!

Keith Chen: Could your language affect your ability to save money? | Video on TED.com

TED Talks What can economists learn from linguists?
Shelby Porter's insight:

This insightful video focuses on the idea of language and how it affects a person’s ability to save money. The speaker, Keith Chen tries to prove that people who speak a “futureless” language such as Chinese have been known to save more of their money rather than people who speak a “future” language such as the United States speaking English. He says this is because people who speak a “future” language think about the future being much farther off, where someone who speaks a “futureless” language associates the future with being much closer. In the video he says that future languages have to change words to describe something. For example, in English we say “it is going to rain tomorrow” or “it rained yesterday” or “it is raining today”. The speaker says that in Chinese, they say “it rain tomorrow” or “it rain yesterday” or “it rain today”. They do not change their entire sentence while an English speaker would have to. Chen feels this has something to do with how people perceive the future, and therefore how they plan and save their money. He also relates religion, education, marital status, and children as playing factors into how people save money. I have never encountered a study like this, but after watching the video I do see his point of view. I can see many people around me interpreting the future as being farther in distance. I can see many different people treating their money differently based on the things listed above, but never before have I heard of language playing a role. I believe saving money has more to do with how we are taught to treat money, and if language plays a factor in that, than he has stumbled across a great economic discovery. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography
Scoop.it!

Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban

Saudi women's new campaign to end driving ban | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia women demanding their government lift a ban that prohibits them from driving are urging the nation's females to drive cars on October 26.

Via Kenny Dominguez
Shelby Porter's insight:

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in. 

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 7:45 AM

In Saudi aabia women still dont have the right to drive. they should get with the program because around the world women are allowed to do many things. This is one of many countries in the middle east that should give women there rights back. Women should be able to drive because it makes there life much easier and they dont have to wait for a taxi or anything. It is amazing how much culture plays a big part on there society.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:12 AM

Just another great example of how much Muslim culture and beliefs play a role in these womens' everyday lives. These women do not have equal rights to men, and many are standing up against this. I hope that in our lifetime, we will see the day Muslim men and women will have equal rights. I think these women are very courageous to go against their government for something they truely want and believe in.

Scooped by Shelby Porter
Scoop.it!

10 ways a government shutdown would affect your daily life

10 ways a government shutdown would affect your daily life | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
10 ways a government shutdown would affect your daily life.
Shelby Porter's insight:

A scary thought to realize this might actaully happen, and it would change our lives. The government shutting down means national amusements such as parks and zoos shut down too. Federal employees can't go to work, and the militarry would not get paid right away. We rely on the government so much that if it were to shut down, our country would be at a loss. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelby Porter
Scoop.it!

Why bother? And other burning questions about Obamacare - NBC News.com

Why bother? And other burning questions about Obamacare - NBC News.com | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it
The new health-insurance exchanges open for enrollment on Tuesday, but a new Kaiser Family Foundation/NBC survey shows most Americans are...
Shelby Porter's insight:

Obamacare is set to open for enrollment on Tuesday October 1 (tomorrow). Many people are still feeling perplexed as to what will happen and how it will work. But good news, the opening of the new exchanges doesn't affect anyone who already has health insurance (through employer or state). The exchanges are a new way to buy health insurance that let people compare the plans available to them and to also see, within minutes, whether the federal government will pay for part of the premiums.There are many different plans and the government is encouraging people to talk to representatives or research it. The opening of the exchange is opening Tuesday but other changes will take place January 1, 2014. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shelby Porter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Shelby's Geography 101 Portfolio | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Shelby Porter's insight:

It is a rare opportunity that the world gets to witness the birth of a new nation. But with the birth of South Sudan, it seems the world was ready to welcome them in. After Sudan became free from Egypt and the United Kingdom in 1956, 39 of thier 55 years of freedom have been in war between the northern part and southern part of the country. It made sense to divide the two. They had different religion focuses, different terrain, and different ways of life. The split was based on a nation wide vote, which well over three million votes were cast. There was really no dispute about a border, one was already mad eby the land. The Sudan was a desert region and as you traveled South it turned into swamp and forests (apparently you can see the border clearly form an aerial view). The border was put in place and now the South Sudan is the 193 nation to join the United Nations. While the Sudan is much larger than the South Sudan, it seems this plan to seperate has worked for the better. Becoming a nation in July 2011, it recieved assistance from the U.N. in its period of transition. Overall, I think the South Sudan and the Sudan seperating was for the best. Now the countires are free to practice their own religions and lifestyles. All that is left to say is #Welcome193 

more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 10:26 AM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.