Sharing Information literacy ideas
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The Teacher's Guide To Choosing The Best Digital Content [Infographic]

The Teacher's Guide To Choosing The Best Digital Content [Infographic] | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Here's a handy visual step-by-step guide to choosing the best digital content for a blended learning environment. Useful for all skill levels!

Via Gust MEES, Glenda Morris
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:

Ver useful, thanks! 

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davidconover's curator insight, May 9, 2013 2:35 PM

Wouldn't this make for a great app?

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 9, 2013 8:29 PM

This is another excellent looking infographic

Ness Crouch's curator insight, May 23, 2013 5:29 AM

Infographics are so handy! Great visual feast!

Sharing Information literacy ideas
Ideas to try, share and engage our students with
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from Future Ready School Libraries
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4 SITES TO FIGHT FAKE NEWS

4 SITES TO FIGHT FAKE NEWS | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
It’s important to discuss media literacy and help your students learn to separate fact from fiction so they can be informed, empowered citizens. Lisa Nielsen and Common Sense Education suggest these four websites to get you started:

Via Jim Lerman, Yashy Tohsaku, Bookmarking Librarian
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A brief and simple explanation about what each one does.
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10 Good Tips To Spot Fake News - EdTech & mLearning 

10 Good Tips To Spot Fake News - EdTech & mLearning  | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
A few days ago we shared with you a new Google feature that allows you to easily fact check online content. Today, we are sharing with you 10 good tips that will enable you to critically assess the veracity and credibility of online content (e.g. news stories).  These are guidelines Facebook Help Centre provided for it users to help them spot fake news. However, these tips can also apply to any other type of content. Students can use them to evaluate digital content and enhance their critical reading comprehension.  We have embedded these tips into the visual below so you can print and share with your students in class.

Via John Evans, reuvenwerber, Dennis T OConnor
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A really nice, easy to use infographic. 
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 17, 4:56 PM

Essential to information literacy: spot the fake!

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, April 18, 3:48 AM
Good to know how to check the news...
 
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, April 21, 8:34 AM
This is a good resource infographic on "Fake News" that can be used within your21st Century teaching and learning environments.
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Librarians and teachers - How to make an information literacy framework work for you.

Librarians and teachers - How to make an information literacy framework work for you. | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
A blog about school libraries and the role of the librarian in teaching and learning. Why information literacy is important.
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from School Library Advocacy
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The Necessity of Teaching Non-Digital Literacy Skills | Knowledge Quest

The Necessity of Teaching Non-Digital Literacy Skills | Knowledge Quest | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
In a recent meeting with the summer reading task force at a local middle school we talked about the topic of how to get students to read during the summer. Plans centered on using resources at the local public library,... Read More ›

Via Karen Bonanno
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Yes! Digital may not always be available and some may not be able to afford it! 
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Use These 5 Steps to Learn How to Ask Good Questions [Infographic]

Use These 5 Steps to Learn How to Ask Good Questions [Infographic] | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Use this 5-step infographic to learn how to ask good questions. Model exceptional questioning behaviour, improve communication, and much more.
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20 Free Stock Photo Sites for Your Social Media Images

20 Free Stock Photo Sites for Your Social Media Images | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Trying to find great free social media images can be incredibly time-consuming. We've put together a list of the best 20 free stock photo sites to help you.
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Important to share when talking to teachers and students about copyright. When there are places you can go to get good quality pictures you should not need to take from Google at any time. 
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Selling Nonfiction with Student-Created Ads

Selling Nonfiction with Student-Created Ads | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Last week, a teacher asked me to help her students explore “our amazing nonfiction collection.” (Her words, really!) Students have always been reluctant browsers in our nonfiction section, even though we put our most enticing titles on display. With our construction project this year, it’s been even worse, as we weeded and condensed nonfiction from five to three rows and the new signage isn’t up yet. I thought about revising our speed dating lesson with all nonfiction categories. Then at lunch another teacher asked me to address persuasive techniques with her class. I recently found the Break Your Own News website and used that to introduce a website evaluation lesson. First flash of brilliance--I realized we could use the site to create book talkers for our nonfiction books! I quickly created a presentation about persuasive techniques in advertising, with videos for each technique.


Via Mary Reilley Clark
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A brilliant lesson to generatie interest in your non-fiction. 
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, March 20, 5:15 PM

Our 6th graders enjoyed this lesson. Now they're working on either argumentative essays or a propaganda project, so they are using the techniques learned in the library.

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What are literacy skills? | #InformationLiteracy #MediaLiteracy #ModernEDU #ICT

What are literacy skills? | #InformationLiteracy #MediaLiteracy #ModernEDU #ICT | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Literacy skills help students gain knowledge through reading as well as using media and technology. These skills also help students create knowledge through writing as well as developing media and technology.

Information Literacy

Students need to be able to work effectively with information, using it at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating). Information literacy involves traditional skills such as reading, researching, and writing; but new ways to read and write have also introduced new skills:

Consuming information: The current excess of information requires students to gain new skills in handling it. When most information came through official publications like books, newspapers, magazines, and television shows, students encountered data that had been prepared by professionals. Now, much information is prepared by amateurs. Some of that work is reliable, but much is not. Students must take on the role of the editor, checking and cross-checking information, watching for signs of bias, datedness, and errors. Students need to look at all information as the product of a communication situation, with a sender, subject, purpose, medium, receiver, and context.Producing information: In the past, students were mostly consumers of information. When they produced information, it was largely for a single reader—the teacher—and was produced for a grade. It was therefore not an authentic communication situation, and students felt that writing was a purely academic activity. Now writing is one of the main ways students communicate. It has real-world applications and consequences. Students need to understand that what they write can do great good or great harm in the real world, and that how they write determines how powerful their words are. Students need to take on the role of professional writers, learning to be effective and ethical producers of information.Media Literacy

Media literacy involves understanding the many ways that information is produced and distributed. The forms of media have exploded in the last decade and new media arrive every day:

- See more at: https://k12.thoughtfullearning.com/FAQ/what-are-literacy-skills#sthash.Ck95Ibcv.dpuf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Media+Literacy

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Ines Bieler, Gust MEES
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A good description of each of the literacies that are needed to ensure our students are fully engaged when researching. 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 5:02 PM

Literacy skills help students gain knowledge through reading as well as using media and technology. These skills also help students create knowledge through writing as well as developing media and technology.

Information Literacy

Students need to be able to work effectively with information, using it at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating). Information literacy involves traditional skills such as reading, researching, and writing; but new ways to read and write have also introduced new skills:

  • Consuming information: The current excess of information requires students to gain new skills in handling it. When most information came through official publications like books, newspapers, magazines, and television shows, students encountered data that had been prepared by professionals. Now, much information is prepared by amateurs. Some of that work is reliable, but much is not. Students must take on the role of the editor, checking and cross-checking information, watching for signs of bias, datedness, and errors. Students need to look at all information as the product of a communication situation, with a sender, subject, purpose, medium, receiver, and context.
  • Producing information: In the past, students were mostly consumers of information. When they produced information, it was largely for a single reader—the teacher—and was produced for a grade. It was therefore not an authentic communication situation, and students felt that writing was a purely academic activity. Now writing is one of the main ways students communicate. It has real-world applications and consequences. Students need to understand that what they write can do great good or great harm in the real world, and that how they write determines how powerful their words are. Students need to take on the role of professional writers, learning to be effective and ethical producers of information.

Media Literacy

Media literacy involves understanding the many ways that information is produced and distributed. The forms of media have exploded in the last decade and new media arrive every day:

- See more at: https://k12.thoughtfullearning.com/FAQ/what-are-literacy-skills#sthash.Ck95Ibcv.dpuf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Media+Literacy

 

 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 22, 2:39 AM
Information and media literacy
Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from Higher education news for libraries and librarians
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Five Laws of Information literacy- UNESCO

Five Laws of Information literacy- UNESCO | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Great inspiring graphic

 

 


Via heather dawson
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A great infographic on the laws of information literacy. Explaining that we all have equal rights to information and to share it. Critical evaluation is an important part of this. 
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5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News via SOPHIA ALVAREZ BOYD

5 Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News via SOPHIA ALVAREZ BOYD | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
SOPHIA ALVAREZ BOYD

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bookmarking Librarian
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Some great ideas worth sharing. 
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Teachers: How important is academic honesty? Essential for digital literacy.

Teachers: How important is academic honesty? Essential for digital literacy. | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
A blog about school libraries and the role of the librarian in teaching and learning. Why information literacy is important.
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Educational Leadership:Literacy in Every Classroom:How Knowledge Powers Reading

Educational Leadership:Literacy in Every Classroom:How Knowledge Powers Reading | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
The brain's active processing capacity is finite, so unless knowledge is encoded in long-term memory, having to search for it actually crowds out other forms of cognition. Knowing things helps you think and read successfully.

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Embedded non-fiction when reading fiction with students helps with understanding not only of the fiction but how non-fiction is a useful tool for learning. Interesting read.
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, February 3, 3:13 PM
This is a powerful article from Educational Leadership that provides research to back up the fact that prior knowledge is a key component to reading instruction. We tend to think that knowing something is less important nowadays because we can simply Google the answer. Not so, according to author Doug Lemov. This is my take-away: "The brain's active processing capacity is finite, so unless knowledge is encoded in long-term memory, having to search for it actually crowds out other forms of cognition. Knowing things helps you think and read successfully."
This has implications for libraries and how we support reading instruction. To me, it also solidifies the practice of allowing students to check out books that interest them as they emerge as readers and not pigeon-hole them into Lexile ranges. Those little nuggets of information could be just that piece of prior knowledge needed to "think and read successfully" in the future. Enjoy!
Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from School Library Advocacy
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Three Things to Brainstorm Before You Search

Three Things to Brainstorm Before You Search | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
One of the things that I ask students to do before they begin any research activity is to take some time to brainstorm. They might groa

Via Karen Bonanno
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Before you start writing,...
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Are you using licensed images in your lessons - archived post form Mark Anderson will help you check!

Are you using licensed images in your lessons - archived post form Mark Anderson will help you check! | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
I often ask teachers if they use Google Images for the pictures they use in the resources they make for the classroom. The majority of . They simply go to the site, search for their image, grab the…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
If it is posted on Google it is not free to take. If you are not sure then don't use it. 
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Teaching Strategies About Source Credibility

Teaching Strategies About Source Credibility | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Here are some teaching strategies we can use to evaluate the credibility of a resource.

Via Cindy Rudy
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A school librarian can support teaching these skills too. 
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Copyright a Little Fuzzy? Shared via @langwitches

Copyright a Little Fuzzy? Shared via @langwitches | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Langwitches, The Magic of Learning.
Modern learning that transforms education in the 21st century. Finding new forms and redefining learning for the challenges of the future .

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Great infograph about copyright. Something to share with teachers. 
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A Scholarly Sting Operation Shines a Light on ‘Predatory’ Journals

A Scholarly Sting Operation Shines a Light on ‘Predatory’ Journals | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
A group of researchers created a ruse to draw attention to the seamy side of open-access journals, some of which will publish just about anything for a fee.
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
If you are guiding students to Google scholar beware. You could be reading something that someone paid to have published. Easy way around this, use the databases from school or university. 

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Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Helping Students Understand Media Literacy - Media Literacy: A crash course in 60 minutes  by @mluhtala via #Edweb

Helping Students Understand Media Literacy - Media Literacy: A crash course in 60 minutes  by @mluhtala via #Edweb | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Best content around Robotics Accessibility selected by the EdTech Update community.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
What is meant by free papers? How does it become free? someone has to pay for peoples time...
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RESENTICE's curator insight, March 22, 10:33 AM

Education aux médias et à l'information une priorité nationale

Gabrielle's curator insight, March 29, 4:27 PM

Digital History 

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Lesson in the Library on How to Spot Fake News

Lesson in the Library on How to Spot Fake News | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Blog about the life of librarian & students at Patrick F. Taylor Academy in Avondale, LA.
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
How to spot fake news. A great lesson that you can use and share. 
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How teacher - librarian collaboration can lead to 'higher order thinking' and 'growth mindset' in students.

How teacher - librarian collaboration can lead to 'higher order thinking' and 'growth mindset' in students. | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
A blog about school libraries and the role of the librarian in teaching and learning. Why information literacy is important.
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52 Weeks of Guided Inquiry | Inquiry based learning that will change how you teach forever

52 Weeks of Guided Inquiry | Inquiry based learning that will change how you teach forever | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Via Karen Bonanno
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Some great ideas for research and enquiry based lessons. 
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Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers

Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it


Critical digital literacy is one of the essential required competencies for the 21st century educator. In an era of unprecedented personal publishing, infobesity (information obesity)...


Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby, Paul West
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Digital literacy is so closely linked with information literacy that they should be taught together.
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Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, March 4, 3:23 PM
Critical Digital Literacy
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 8, 1:34 AM
Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers
Encarna Llamas's curator insight, March 11, 3:55 AM
Pensamiento crítico y TICs

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How Search Works - An Illustrated Explanation

How Search Works - An Illustrated Explanation | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Google search is a part of our students' daily lives (most of them have never lived in world without Google), but often they don't know how the search results displayed before them got there. How Search Works is an animated graphic that reveals the basics of how websites are sorted, ranked, and presented to you in your search results.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, February 21, 8:23 AM
Become a better searcher by knowing how Google Search works.
Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Toolkit for Digitally-Literate Teachers | USC Rossier Online

USC Rossier's Toolkit for Digitally-Literate Teachers provides teachers with how-to guides, actionable strategies and real-life examples of the benefits of digital literacy in the classroom.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Amazing Resource
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Developing digital literacy in learners | eWorks

Developing digital literacy in learners | eWorks | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
“Digital literacy involves finding, using and disseminating information in a digital world” (Deakin University, 2016). Digital literacy is also a transversal skill, which means that by having good digital literacy, a person’s ability to learn and improve other skills increases through the use of technology.

In the next 5-10 years, a number of routine jobs will be taken over by automation and artificial intelligence (AI) (ACS, 2016). This automation and AI will also be ingrained in workplaces, homes and everything we do, due to the increased productivity and lifestyle gains that these technologies provide. In order to remain current in the workplace, and to be able to fully function in society, the need for good digital literacy has never been greater.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Digital and information literacy go hand in hand. This is a good guide to how to use digital literacy in school. 
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