Sharing cultures through story telling (HSIE Stage 1)
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Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Folktales from Around the World

Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Folktales from Around the World | Sharing cultures through story telling (HSIE Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Mittiga's insight:

Global Kids Oz is a website that is made specifically to bring global diversity and knowledge to Australia and more so the Australian classroom. It has a huge amount of resources such as articles on several countries of the world and their respective traditions. It is great for teachers because it also gives them tips on how to deal with cultural diversity in the classroom. This page I have Scooped explains the importance of folktales and also the different types of folktales found in different cultures. The information this source provides is more for the teacher to use as they are studying this topic in the classroom. It provides links to other resources for the teacher to use as well. It gives the teacher a few ideas to use in the classroom including roleplay, create your own folktale, and class presentations. This information gives the students the ability to start brainstorming and discussing their own knowledge of folklore. They can discuss a number of stories that may know such as fairytales, Christmas or other religious traditions that they participate in. Using strategies such as ‘Think, Pair and Share’ would be a good way to start this unit and establishing background knowledge in the students. Sharing their different background knowledge with their classmates gives them the opportunity to learn of other cultures and stories that they may not know.

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Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum

Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum | Sharing cultures through story telling (HSIE Stage 1) | Scoop.it
In terms of classroom learning and the Australian Curriculum, the exploration of message sticks brings together history, science, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, liter...
Elizabeth Mittiga's insight:

 “Message sticks are a form of communication between Aboriginal nations”. The message stick was used similar to a ‘passport’; a message was carved or painted onto the surface and then carried from country to country spreading messages. Although message sticks were not traditionally used as ‘story telling tools’, message sticks could be used to portray how other types of messages can be passed along. Learn a different form of communication from a different culture. Students could make their own message sticks depicting their own families or stories. It will enable the students to try a new form of communication. This gives an insight for students to learn about another culture and how they communicate. They can discuss the differences between their forms of communications such as text messaging, emails and letters to the message stick. It gives students room to compare, analyse and evaluate the differences between their own culture and the Aboriginal culture. Depending again on the diversity of your classroom this may be new knowledge for many students. This source gives a good example of traditional methods communication and story telling in the Aboriginal culture.

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Dust Echoes

Elizabeth Mittiga's insight:

Dust Echoes is an interactive site for children to learn specific Aboriginal stories. They can ‘explore’ different areas of the Australian outback and click on characters that tell a short story through animated videos. This would be good to use either together (i.e. on the Smartboard with the class on the mat) or in pairs on laptops/computers depending on the resources available. The videos are fun and stories are simplified which makes these very suitable for children in the classroom. Alongside the videos there is also a glossary, available downloads which include teachers guides as well as students worksheets to do as activities after watching the video. Videos are good for many types of learners such as visual and audio learners – an important aspect to consider when devising how teachers going to teach their classes. Technology is a useful teaching tool for many teachers and the students often enjoy time on the computers. Dust Echoes provides a good example of an Aboriginal perspective on story telling. These videos not only share a story but they also give information regarding the origin of the stories and what they mean. It is this information that will help give the videos a cultural context for the students.

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Chinese New Year - Zodiac Story

Chinese New Year - Zodiac Story | Sharing cultures through story telling (HSIE Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Find out about the Dragon Dance and other customs and traditions associated with Chinese New Year such as the Lantern Festival, Lion Dance and more.
Elizabeth Mittiga's insight:

This website is a good source for information on Chinese traditions. The page that I have linked to is of the traditional story of the Chinese Zodiac and how it came to be. For Stage 1 it could be read out to the class by the teacher, however it is sometimes long. Depending on the class, students can take turns reading it aloud but perhaps using a simplified version of the story instead. It will help the students learn something about another culture. China is one of the biggest countries in the world culturally; with many Chinese families moving to Australia their culture has a big impact on our Australian backyard. Depending on the cultural diversity of the school you are teaching in this may be a familiar story for some students and perhaps you could get your students talking bout their own backgrounds. A story like the Chinese Zodiac would be interesting for many students as they can look up their own Zodiac and find out which animal they are aligned with and find out their own personality traits and this gets the students involved in the story. With this site there is also a number of activities for children to do relating to this story. For those students unaware of the Chinese Zodiac, which is much like the Western Horoscope, they will learn an element of another culture.

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The Littlest Christmas Tree

Printable templates for children's holiday crafts and activities for preschool, kindergarten and elementary school kids.
Elizabeth Mittiga's insight:

This is a script for a simple Christmas play. It refers to the tradition of the Christmas tree with elements of the Baby Jesus as well. This play is very simple, made for younger children so would be good for S1 students. The amount of children involved can be from 9 to 20 so very easy to get the whole class or just some students involved. Role-play is a teaching strategy that has proved to be useful in establishing a subject in a real life context. While teaching them the HSIE content is also teaches them skills in negotiating, working in a team and drama skills. It may be harder to engage the quieter, shyer students. Those who have the tradition of decorating the Christmas tree with their families can share their stories. Others who don’t may learn something new or may be able to share what their families do instead or otherwise. This play has a good connection to the traditional Christian story of the birth of Jesus. It could be used to introduce the topic of religion and into one of the largest religions in the world.

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