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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 6:52 PM

Some of these pictures are amazing. Im lucky enough to have been able to experience a few of these in my life.  The fire in Turkmenistan is unreal. I cant believe that fire has been burning since 1971. It really does seem like the "Door to Hell".

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

Rescooped by GranGoddessa from Geography Education
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Homemade Butterfly Feeder

Homemade Butterfly Feeder | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

According to a study published in the June 2003 issue of "Conservation Biology," there are 561 known butterfly species in the U.S. and Canada.

 

"Not only are these insects beautiful, they're important pollinators and vital to the health of their natural habitats. You can encourage these gentle creatures to visit your yard by using easy-to-make butterfly food and feeders."


Via Seth Dixon
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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 7:12 PM

This article was nice to read. We tend to overlook the butterfly species as a whole and many people wouldn't know that there are only 56 species remaining when there are 561 known species in the United States and Canada. This species is slowly disappearing and this article sheds some light on why they are important and beneficial. Butterflies are important for the health of the nature around us because they are pollinators. This encourages individuals to make butterfly feeders which is not something that most people would think about doing. Creating a feeder would not be harmful in any way because these creatures are beneficial and beautiful to look at. They provided different recipes to put in the feeder such as overripe fruit and other ingredients such as honey. Butterflies like fermented fruits and if you have some in your yard, this article encourages you to start your feeder through that. Make your feeder eye-catching and appealing so that a butterfly will actually approach it. This is such a simple way to give back to nature and allow the rest to take its course. 

Rescooped by GranGoddessa from AP Human Geography Resources
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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!