Share Some Love Today
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Share Some Love Today
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Curated by GranGoddessa
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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

"Many of us tend to think of Antarctica as a sheet of solid snow and ice. But, in contrast with its peer to the north, the southern pole's ice sheet lies atop a rocky continent. What are its features, its mountains and valleys, plains and coastlines?

A new dataset from the British Antarctic Survey provides the most detailed map ever of the bedrock below, information scientists hope will enable them to better model the affects of climate change on the ice, whose melting will have an impact on climate the world over."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2013 2:12 PM

This video sheds some light on explorations to uncover truths about one of the most remote places on Earth.


Tags: Antarctica, water, physical, remote sensing, geospatial.


Johani Karonen's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:46 AM

Talking about challanges - Amundsen and Scott sure had a tough one!

Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM

This is the Intellctual part of Antarctica. This video talks about what is underneathAntarctica. Its' ice is flowing out towardsstone sea and could contribute to sea rise. If Antarctica didn't have anymoreonce our ocean would have a major rise but Antarctica would be a new place. 

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Great Places

Great Places | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it
Hawaii, Kauai Island...where they shot the Jurassic Park...

 

Sometimes we all to see a fabulously gorgeous physical landscape and marvel at the beauty that is in this world.  For some other amazing images, see this collection. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 2014 6:23 PM

Here is a collection of imagines that encapsulate different landscapes and provokes different emotions. It is always nice to see pictures from places other than where you come from; the marvels of the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:41 AM

All these scoops are full of beautiful landscapes and places for tourists to visit. With Jurassic Park being such a big part of social culture and history, these landscapes are definitely worth venturing to. Hawaii is one of the biggest tourist and vacation spots in general. For all those who are able to travel there, they should invest in taking a trip to Kauai as well.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:49 PM

These landscapes are amazing, seeing how different many of these place are and yet all beautiful, shows how the physical landscapes of the world are so diverse.

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Google Earth Fractals

Google Earth Fractals | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

Who says you can't integrate geography and real world applications into the math curriculum?  Paul Bouke has scoured the Earth searching for fractals in the natural environment and created this amazingly artistic remote sensing gallery (with KMZ files for viewing in Google Earth as well).  

 

Tags: Remote sensing, art, math, google, physical, landforms, geomorphology. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 9, 2012 8:40 PM
Thanks for sharing so many great link on FB and have been able to use several. I'm glad that the sharing can go in both directions.
Ann Kissinger Wurst's comment, September 9, 2012 8:44 PM
Seth - I am hardly worthy of YOUR currating! Hope to meet you in person at NCGE and get a picture of us for Facebook. :-)
Paige T's comment, September 10, 2012 11:21 AM
This is so beautiful. Fractals are an amazing phenomenon, whether you are an artist, geographer, or mathematician. I love being able to see fractals in plants or feel them as air travels through my lungs.
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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 13, 2013 8:06 AM

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 11:34 AM

Another interesting failure of the Soviets during the Cold War. One really begins to question their competence when reading about this, Chernobyl and the Aral Sea. I honestly don't see how anyone would consider lighting a major gas leak on fire would help the situation either. Regardless this site stands as a testament to the influence we have on the geography of area through our reshaping for society. The incident also now helps Turkmenistan economically because it offers tourist attraction revenue. Additionally while the gallery had many fascinating images from around the world this one captivated me due to its historical nature and affect it would have had on the region. Hopefully the site doesn't ever become too dangerous do to the flammable substances because I would imagine that is a possibility (also hopefully there is not too much environmental damage from it either).

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Wind Map

Wind Map | Share Some Love Today | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Ph.D. This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.


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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 8:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 9:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:53 AM

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!