Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe
278 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Patient Engagement: the Linchpin in PCMH Transformation

Patient Engagement: the Linchpin in PCMH Transformation | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
In NICHQ’s work to transform practices into medical homes, family partners play a key role in providing guidance for how to make change. Ziva Mann is one of these family partners, working with a team from Cambridge Pediatrics in Massachusetts.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media Implementation Checklist

Social Media Implementation Checklist | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

Set goals first. If traffic, leads and sales are part of the goal, then gotta have the next focus be on content creation. Then, using social to share. Can't get much value out of social unless you're actively creating, publishing and sharing content. 


Via nrip
Hupertan's insight:

The implementation of a communications strategy in social media in healthcare need not stick with the drafting of a check list. There she is!

more...
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Benefits, Risks and Best Practices of Social Media for Healthcare Professionals

Benefits, Risks and Best Practices of Social Media for Healthcare Professionals | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Lots of social media tools are available for health care specialists (HCPs), consisting of social media platforms, blogs, microblogs, wikis, media-sharing sites, and virtual reality and gaming environments.
Hupertan's insight:

Here's a great article on the social media in healthcare #hcsm that everyone should read! Especially students, residents, nurses eand doctors!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The time for academic medicine to embrace social media is now

The time for academic medicine to embrace social media is now | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

“Publish or perish” has been the mantra of academic medicine for as long as can be recalled as the reputations of professors, physicians, and academic centers have hinged on contributions to peer-reviewed literature for years.  Yet today’s information era is dominated by the rapid development of social media and online interactions, which have also resulted in some major advancements to print media as the majority of newspapers have now moved to an online format.  Despite these changes in media, academic medicine — and its reliance on peer-reviewed journals — has lagged behind.  Why has academic medicine not evolved to keep up with advances in social media?  What are the unique opportunities and dangers associated with the greater adoption of social media in medicine?

In contemporary academic medicine, a publication in a peer-reviewed journal remains the gold standard that defines success and influences grants, upward mobility and tenure.  The peer review process begins when the author submits a manuscript.  The manuscript is then reviewed by several experts in the same scholarly field (peers).  The peer reviewers assess for quality, accuracy, and validity.  In most cases, the reviewers are blinded from the identity of the author, so the article is judged based on its merit alone.  In academic publishing, this peer review process serves to protect the integrity and quality of the research.  However, there are many flaws with the system.

For one, the peer review process has created a “Glamour mag” culture with researchers largely focused on submitting articles to academic journals with a high “impact factor.”  The impact factor of a journal is a measure that reflects the average number of citations to recently published articles and is a means of determining the highest quality journals for publication.  It is largely believed that publication in a journal with a high impact factor is the most prestigious publication possible and reflects the highest quality of research of an individual or institution.  However, this ultimately creates a prolonged and arduous peer-review process.  For many of the top journals, the peer review process can take over a year before acceptance and even longer to reach print.  By this time, many statistics may already be outdated and/or potential advancements may be delayed from being rapidly instituted.

In addition to this the Glamour mag culture, the competitive atmosphere and the desire to stay relevant has further diluted the quality of research.  This sentiment is shared by Michael Eisen, a biologist at the University of California at Berkeley.  He states, “The thinking that ‘I have to get my paper into these [top] journals,’ just corrupts and poisons the way people do science itself.”  He goes on to say, “It leads to people making their work sound sexy at the expense of its veracity.”  Eisen speaks to a growing problem in the scientific community: “irreproducible” research.

The integration of social media and medicine is still in its infancy and, as a result, there is no impact factor for social media contributions, which may largely go unrecognized.  Nonetheless, social media might relieve the anxiety of publishing to stay relevant.  While the peer-review process is the cornerstone of scientific validation, social media offers professors, physicians and academic institutions the opportunity to publish from their own user handles in a way that is unconstrained from “pleasing” a top journal with sexy yet potentially mediocre research.

In fact, social media offers many distinct advantages.  By its very nature, social media can be used as a more effective tool to disseminate medical information to larger audiences than traditional methods.  While a top journal such as the New England Journal of Medicine reaches as many as 600,000 readers weekly, a social media publication may easily reach millions and is accessible anywhere in the world.  Moreover, unlike journals, social media is not shackled by membership fees, which narrows the subscriber audience.  Anyone who possesses a data-capable phone, computer or other tech device has the ability to connect and contribute to the social media web.  Lastly, publishing on social media may improve the public’s understanding of science.  While most journals are read by professionals of that particular field, social media publications have the potential of reaching a larger audience of laypeople who may not entirely understand the language within a professional manuscript but are nonetheless interested in the topic.

In addition, social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube can connect with the general patient population to promote communication and overall public health more so than traditional methods of publication.  Social media authors often publish work that is intended for the general public and typically do so in a way that doesn’t compromise the integrity of scientific communication.  For example, at a time when the public desired to understand breaking epidemiologic news, Chiduzie Madubata, MD published a blog article entitled, “Ebola in the digital age: How doctors can confront it,” on KevinMD.com. Dr. Madubata shines a spotlight on social media as a medium for doctors to share information with their patients, colleagues, and the public and also for patients to share information with physicians.  The physician has the ability to interact and gauge the extent of public understanding as viewed in the comments section. He or she can clear up any misunderstandings and learn where the medical community should communicate more effectively.  Social media enhances the way medical information reaches a consumer.

Despite the great potential of social media in medicine, there are many concerns — so much so that professional organizations such as the American Medical Association (AMA) have published guidelines for the ethical use of social media.  In many aspects, traditional medicine has valued privacy and confidentiality, which sometimes seems to contradict the open and informal nature of social networking.  Recently, a number of institutions have implemented strict social media policies in response to privacy concerns, including a case in which a medical student posted pictures with cadavers online.  However, with advancements in social media, privacy settings have also evolved.  Many physician-to-physician websites such as VuMedi and Doximity are visible to only physicians who are members, while sites such as Facebook allow physicians to select who can see a specific post.

Another apprehension is that the rapid dissemination of knowledge through online articles in emerging “open access” journals has given rise to predatory journals with short and loose peer review processes as these publications are often willing to publish articles solely for profit.

It is clear that the future of medicine and publishing will have a large online/social component.  How should academic institutions view these contributions?  Should authors who publish on social media websites be recognized?  This question will linger for many years as medical education evolves to keep pace with the social norms of society.



Via Plus91
Hupertan's insight:

La médecine académique devrait enfin se pencher l'aspect de réseautage des réseaux sociaux et leur applicabilité en médecine: il n'y a pas que Ebola, il y la grippe, et les autres épidémies, les accidents technologiques..... Il y a du retard... Vite, c'est urgent!

more...
Eric Rodriguez's curator insight, September 23, 2015 12:45 PM

To implement social media in academic medicine will take a big push by the so called "Glamour Mag" sector. I do agree though that, "For one, the peer review process has created a “Glamour mag” culture with researchers largely focused on submitting articles to academic journals with a high “impact factor.”, the system is flawed. If you can only get your works reviewed by these publications are we limiting ourselves?  

Rescooped by Hupertan from Blogging For Business
Scoop.it!

How to write good blog posts for your audience and SEO

How to write good blog posts for your audience and SEO | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Here is a step by step methodology I use to write good blog posts for SEO and for my audience. I hope you can relate to that, let me know if you like it!

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Marketing Guide

As a busy healthcare professional, your days are filled to the brim with caring for your patients and managing your thriving practice. If you want to boost you…

Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The ROI of Social Media in Healthcare

The ROI of Social Media in Healthcare | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

There has never been a more misleading term in business than social media.
Healthcare executives have been trained to ask for the ROI of everything, but for some reason they put more focus on this when it comes to social than other traditional forms of media and advertising. Hospitals and health systems aren’t selling mugs or t-shirts so tracing direct business back to social can be tricky. With social marketing this conversation is a little complicated and requires some patience to understand the true return on investment. Confusion has been added by so called “marketing gurus” who have pulled the wool over business owners eyes, having them focus on likes, followers, retweets, and other impressions that simply don’t matter for business. The real value of social is the ability to provide value to your audience and tell the story of what your business does and why you are passionate about it. This creates long-term customers who remain interested in being your consumer for life.

To tackle this issue, we need to understand what social media really means. Social media marketing is focusing where the eyeballs are located. It is just what people are calling storytelling and communicating to your customers in 2015. Your healthcare customers and community are using these platforms, simply because practically everyone in the modern world uses them daily. At one point it was called Web 2.0, or audience building, or online marketing. Tomorrow it might be called full circle platform engagement building or some other crazy term but the basic principles will remain the same.

Social media is a term that stirs up many pre-existing mental associations. For those of us old enough, we remember the days of Friendster or MySpace and think of social as purely a form of entertainment designed to waste time and crush boredom. Others can recall the stories in the media about SnapChat only being used by teenagers to send sexts. If you still have this view of SnapChat, rethink the value for marketing quickly. Others think of Facebook as being unemployed people playing farming and candy crush games all day long. This is simply not true.

As a healthcare executive or business owner, your biggest advantage of investing in social media is that everyone is doing it wrong. So many businesses are still treating social media like a print ad and not branding and communications tools. They are using it as a sales pitch and not providing true value to the audience. The way to stand out in 2015 is to actually provide value and gain the respect of your customers by giving them information they need without the sales pitch.

Marketing expert Gary Vaynerchuk is leading the discussion on this topic. When executives of Fortune 500 companies ask him the ROI of social media he has famously responded by asking them what is the ROI of their mother. After a puzzled look, he explains that the ROI of his own mother is everything to him. I believe what he means is that without his mother teaching, educating, caring and supporting him he would be nothing. I believe that the statement is also meant to force the person asking it to wonder why the ROI question comes up more with social than anything else in their businesses.
Vaynerchuk drills it down to the concept that ROI is never about the tool it is about the mechanic using it. If business owners treat it like all the other forms of advertising in the history of selling, they will lose and the ROI will be nothing.

Expectations are so crucial when talking about the ROI for social media. It takes a tremendous amount of time to create content that engages people online. It also takes time to build up a following via word-of-mouth and paid advertising for those platforms. If you are a healthcare group that needs results by the end of this quarter, I suggest that you don’t look at social media to solve your problems. However, if you are looking to build long-term brand equity and trust with your audience, then invest heavily in this area.

In my region of healthcare (hospitals and wound care management) there are many who still don’t fully understand the power of social marketing. One of the things I am most excited about is our recent creation of our Shockwave module of Luvo, a cloud-based management system that powers all wound care operational services into one convenient, easily accessible technology platform. Under Shockwave our team has been managing the social media pages for our hospital partner’s outpatient wound centers. When we help educate partners that social is a long-term strategy to drive patient awareness, we are able to prove to them that the ROI is there. When I am able to connect a referring physician with one of our wound center program directors, that is the ROI of social media. When I am able to connect someone with a non-healing wound with one of our wound centers that can help them heal and possibly save them from amputation, infection and ultimately and untimely death, that is the ROI of social media.
Nothing makes me prouder than the fact that we have been able to do this and prove to hospitals that social media marketing works.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Troubles de l'érection. Une crème alternative au Viagra en vente en juin

Troubles de l'érection. Une crème alternative au Viagra en vente en juin | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Un traitement des troubles de l'érection, sous forme de crème à appliquer au niveau de l'organe, pourra être délivré sur ordonnance à partir du 1er juin dans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Impuissance : la crème des traitements !

Impuissance : la crème des traitements ! | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Lundi sera commercialisé un nouveau médicament contre les troubles de l'érection qui permet de remplacer l'aiguille de l'injection par une application locale.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

La première crème pour faciliter l'érection

La première crème pour faciliter l'érection | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
A partir du 1er juin, il sera possible de trouver en pharmacie le premier traitement de la dysfonction érectile sous forme de crème. Même si ce produit en fera sûrement "rêver" plus d’un, une commission de la transparence de la Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS), rendue le 18 mars 2015, met en garde ses utilisateurs contre de nombreux effets indésirables.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Vitaros: du nouveau pour stimuler l'érection

Vitaros: du nouveau pour stimuler l'érection | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Après les comprimés, la crème! Vitaros arrive en pharmacie. Ce nouveau traitement promet de stimuler les érections y compris après une chirurgie de la prostate.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media Vital in Marketing Large Urology Practices

Social Media Vital in Marketing Large Urology Practices | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

In the age of social media, simply having a website isn’t enough. To keep existing patients and attract new ones, large urology group practices need to build websites that are connected to social media outlets at every turn, said Peter M. Knapp, Jr, MD, president of Urology of Indiana, during a talk Friday at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association in Orlando, Florida. Urology of Indiana includes 30 urologists and five urogynecologists who, together, log more than 100,000 patient visits per year.

 

The group is located in 17 offices across central Indiana and serves 18 hospitals. “Our group is very wide and diverse geographically,” Knapp said, “but also goes very deep in urology with subspecialty services, which created some unique challenges for us in how to promote and position ourselves online.” One thing was certain: Partners agreed that their previous website needed to be modernized. They sought help from a marketing company specializing in social media, and the results can serve as a model for other urology groups, said Knapp, who spoke during a program organized by the Society of University Urologists and the Society for Urology Chairpersons and Program Directors. “We needed a website that was more clear and focused in its navigational structure, included more visual storytelling and modern coding to connect it to social media channels, and was mobile [phone]-friendly,” he said. “Thirty percent of people who own cell phones are looking for health information on their mobile devices, so our site needed to work well on cell phones.” The company that helped shape the site was Social Spotlight Media, founded by the doctor’s daughter, Laura Knapp; she spoke about the “do’s and don’ts” of social media in medicine/urology during the program. Knapp said the firm taught his practice to use a “push/pull” strategy to communicate with the public, with the website as its centerpiece.

 

The “push” part of the strategy involves encouraging established patients to visit the site to view physician profiles, clinical content, subspecialty services, and patient education tools, ideally moving on to the practice’s Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Google Plus, and/or Twitter pages from there. The “pull” part of the plan entails grabbing the attention of potential new patients and caregivers who are searching online for doctors or information about medical conditions, Knapp said. If a patient finds Urology of Indiana’s educational videos about diagnosis and management of specific conditions on YouTube, for example, he will also find a link to the practice’s website, where he can learn about its services and physicians and click to make an appointment and even to receive the group’s newsletter. Clearly, Knapp said, the changes to the practice’s website have made it more of a two-way street. “Our old website was heavy on clinical content…and had our toll-free phone number for people to call, but there was no way for a patient to interact with us,” he said. While the site still includes the phone number, it now also offers detailed and categorized information on the conditions the practice treats and on every doctor in the group, along with their specialties and locations, and an opportunity to request appointments with them that will be confirmed within 24 hours.

 

Visitors can also share pages of the website with others through Facebook and other channels, Knapp said. The doctor gave special attention to YouTube during his talk, saying the site is particularly useful as a marketing tool. “We’ve learned a lot using YouTube, which is the second most-active search engine,” he said. “We’ve also learned from Social Spotlight Media that patients are two times more likely to visit your website after viewing a video, so it’s an excellent way for them to get to your website, and they’re more likely to do it there than they are through a Google search. The other thing that we’ve recognized and appreciated is that video life is infinite. Videos we put on several years ago are still there, and our old content generates over 500 views a month and increases our search engine optimization.” Once medical practices have interactive websites set up, there are some principles they should abide by, Laura Knapp explained. “Do’s” include having a social media strategy in place, creating sharable content, listening and responding to visitors’ questions, and figuring out what type of content resonates with patients. Among the “don’ts” are violating HIPAA rules, ignoring patients who are responding to the practice’s online presence with either positive or negative feedback, paying people to become online followers, being overly promotional, and being argumentative or rude.

 

Knapp encouraged his peers to get their practices more engaged with social media. “Why use social media and digital marketing?” he asked. “Because that’s where the people are. No matter what our compensation models are, whether they’re today’s fee-for-service or tomorrow’s bundled payments, healthcare consumers—patients, caregivers, and insurers—will still have choice among providers. They’re going to find us on Google, YouTube, and Facebook, and they’re going to evaluate us on Health Grades, Yelp, and Vitals. “So, get in the space. Be interactive. And, as Laura says, be social.” - See more at: http://www.onclive.com/conference-coverage/aua-2014/Social-Media-Vital-in-Marketing-Large-Urology-Practices#sthash.Zbr3j81X.dpuf


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

TROUBLES DE L’ERECTION POUR LES NULS : causes, mécanismes by Dr Mallet

TROUBLES DE L’ERECTION POUR LES NULS : causes, mécanismes  by Dr Mallet | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
La dysfonction érectile est une pathologie complexe qui associe des pathologies organiques et une éventuelle emprise psychologique. Cette pathologie est très dommageable pour l’estime de soi et res...
Hupertan's insight:

Excellent article by @MalletR on www.urolog.fr

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Engaging Patients: 7 Lessons We’ve Learned

Engaging Patients: 7 Lessons We’ve Learned | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Since joining the EngagingPatients.org team in December 2014, I have been routinely astonished and impressed by the remarkable work being done throughout the country to improve the way patients are engaged in their own healthcare.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Les points clés - Cancer de la prostate | Institut National Du Cancer

Les points clés - Cancer de la prostate | Institut National Du Cancer | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

Les points clés

La #prostate est une glande de l'appareil génital masculin. Le cancer de la prostate correspond au développement de cellules cancéreuses dans la prostate. Dans environ 95 % des cas, il s'agit d'un adénocarcinome, c'est-à-dire d'un cancer glandulaire.

Le cancer de la prostate est le cancer masculin le plus fréquent en France et dans les pays occidentaux en général, nettement devant les cancers du poumon et du côlon-rectum.

Le diagnostic de cancer de la prostate est habituellement suspecté lors d'une augmentation de la valeur du PSA (marqueur de l'activité de la prostate), lorsqu'une anomalie a été détectée au toucher rectal ou si des symptômes urinaires ou généraux (fatigue, perte d'appétit, perte de poids) sont présents.

Une biopsie peut être indiquée lorsqu'une anomalie a été détectée par un toucher rectal, lorsque la valeur du PSA est élevée pour l'âge de l'homme, ou qu'elle augmente avec le temps. Les tissus prélevés sont alors examinés au microscope par un pathologiste qui réalise un examen anatomopathologique. Cet examen permet d'établir la présence ou l'absence de cellules cancéreuses dans le prélèvement.

Plusieurs types de traitements peuvent être proposés selon le résultat des différents examens réalisés lors du bilan diagnostique : chirurgie, radiothérapie externe, curiethérapie, hormonothérapie, surveillance active.

Un traitement est actuellement en cours d'évaluation. Il s'agit du traitement par ultrasons focalisés de haute intensité. Il a pour but de détruire localement, par la chaleur, la prostate et la tumeur. Il est actuellement proposé à certains patients atteints de cancers de la prostate localisés à faible risque, dans des conditions très précises.

Plusieurs médecins de spécialités différentes se réunissent, en réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire, pour discuter des solutions de traitements possibles dans votre cas. Ils se basent pour cela sur des recommandations de bonne pratique. Ils peuvent également vous proposer de participer à un essai clinique.

Dans tous les cas, la prise en charge thérapeutique est définie en accord avec vous sur la base de l'avis rendu en réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire.

L'équipe qui vous prend en charge comprend des professionnels de différentes spécialités. Ces professionnels travaillent en collaboration au sein de l'établissement de santé dans lequel vous recevez vos traitements et en lien avec votre médecin traitant.

Les traitements peuvent engendrer des effets secondaires qui font également l'objet d'une prise en charge médicale. Des conseils pratiques peuvent aussi vous aider à les atténuer.

Votre prise en charge est globale. En plus des traitements spécifiques du cancer de la prostate, des soins et soutiens complémentaires peuvent être nécessaires pour traiter les conséquences de la maladie et de ses traitements : douleurs, fatigue, troubles de la sexualité, troubles urinaires, troubles alimentaires, besoin de soutien psychologique...

Hupertan's insight:

Excellent résumé sur le cancer de la prostate!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Where Social Media and Patient Engagement Really Intersect - Welcome to EngagingPatients.org!

Where Social Media and Patient Engagement Really Intersect - Welcome to EngagingPatients.org! | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Some feel social media channels, like Facebook could be important in patient engagement. But these are really more about social and less about engagement,
Hupertan's insight:

The presence of caregivers (doctors and other health professionals, hospitals, practice), on social media in a B2C objectives (which I called D2P = doc2patient) is the engagement patients. And engagement, is much more than simply consultation but all exchanges to which the patient will be better cared for! Or is this intersection between social media presences and patient engagement. Doctors, you should start to network with your patients!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media Compliance for Hospitals and Practices

Social Media Compliance for Hospitals and Practices

Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Is It Possible That Social Media Can Revolutionize Healthcare?

Is It Possible That Social Media Can Revolutionize Healthcare? | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

Can social media revolutionize healthcare? Is it possible for social media to revolutionize healthcare? - The question poses somewhat in this manner. The answer is, Yes, social media do possess certain characteristics that makes it possible for healthcare to revolutionize. Now, lets look into what exactly these possibilities are, how it has come into existence, how it has created an impact and how it’s doing its best and without it the world at present shall go on the verge of being not so very well functionable technologically.download (2)As per the records, there is a veritable social revolution, including social networking sites, wikis, blogs, and other online forums, for healthcare, say Katherine Chretien, MD, of Washington DC VA Medical Center, and Terry Kind, MD, of The George Washington University School of Medicine. IT-enhanced care coordination is having an impact for a safer and more effective care. Some examples of healthcare applications for social media and collaboration platforms:Second-generation patient portals and messaging systems to engage patients in their own care.Tracking application for patients’ movements from hospital to home to doctor and then visit to nursing home.Social media tools providing doctors online access to specialists to help managing tough cases and making complicated diagnoses.Other tools for enhancing reputation of provider organizations, such as offering various educational resources.Most EHR systems have the capacity of the abovementioned applications. Clinicians, though, are having difficultyBlog-2-300x168 using it and often don’t interoperate across healthcare providers. Thus, this makes social media to “rapidly become a preferred medium for patient-to-physician, patient-to-patient, and physician-to-physician communication”, says David Chou, CIO at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Some medical centers offer online support programs allowing patients diagnosed with the same disease share experiences and coping skills. Others utilize social media to engage patients and build loyalty. Some dedicate communications team to consistently send messages to the public. Despite the mentioned advantages, there were also limitations. One of which is the tendency of patients to complain every minor ache and pain, knowing their doctors are always online. Clinicians, on the other hand, complain for not being adequately compensated for the time they spend in responding to patient messages. This calls for clear guidelines for patient-doctor communication and relationships online, considering the list of potential healthcare applications for social media and collaboration platforms is almost limitless.Some ways in which social media is able to revolutionize healthcare:SmartphonesThe smartphone and apps have been the catalyst for major changes at the point of care and the smartphone leading the way in healthcare is the iPhone. While not the first mobile device to be brought into the hospital, it was without a doubt the harbinger of small form factor devices being adopted for clinical care. Healthcare uses of smartphones have expanded with application development, leveraging built-in hardware including cameras, accelerometers and Bluetooth communication. There is now demand for the full enterprise environment on this mobile platform.Wi-FiAt many hospitals the wireless LAN (WLAN) now connects more devices than the wired LAN. It started withiStock_000009306523XSmall workstations on wheels (WoWs) and now encompasses medical devices, phones, video units, realtime locating systems (RTLS), and guest Internet access. Wi-Fi availability is the norm as we move towards a digital space with mobile adoption.SOCIAL MEDIA – THE MAIN CAUSE OF REVOLUTIONIZATIONSocial media, such as Twitter and Facebook, provides a platform that is transforming healthcare. It allows hospitals to reach out to staff, patients, younger audiences, and the general public in new ways. Not only does it improve patient engagement, but it provides a means to manage population health. Social media is rapidly becoming a preferred medium for patient-to-physician, patient-to-patient, and physician-to-physician communication.Mobile healthWith the increasing focus on decreasing healthcare costs, mHealth provides a spectrum of ways to leverage mobility to improve clinical work flows and outcomes. These range from video remote interpretation, to telemedicine and remote care use cases. The next step will be adoption of wearable technologies. We are in a mobile world and with mHealth, medical professionals, have the ability to make clinical decisions based on telemedicine technology and wearables. mHealth allows access to medical care from anywhere anytime. Rural areas can be provided with the same quality of care as the metropolitan population. With wearable devices and sensors individuals will be able to monitor their health the same way we monitor our cars, to stay on schedule with regular maintenance. This is a big step that offers individuals the benefits of personal big data.SOCIAL MEDIA AND IT’S BUSINESS RELATED ACTIVITIESBrands have limited roles in our actual social life. We just have to understand how and where we can be part of the conversation. In our regulated industry, we’re limited in what we say, so we say very little. Once we’ve recited our label, we’re going to repeat what’s on our label (and maybe offer a coupon). So, absent of any true guidelines from the FDA, what can the industry do? Particularly now that most every manufacturer is looking at ways to “go beyond the pill” and promote more of a patient-centric approach to their business. Social media should be viewed more as a way of doing business and less as a means of promotion. While promotion is a component, there are now aspects of social that can be applied to a number of areas, in a compliant way.Social-Media-in-HealthcareMoreover, the marketing function of the pharmaceutical industry needs to begin focusing on changing its thinking around social media, to more of an engagement-oriented model and less around advertising and promotion. Social media should be viewed as an integral part of the overall marketing mix and not be fixed in an area or being the domain of corporate communications. Granted, this relegates the use of social media to a couple of areas, such as those outlined above. But that is much better than doing nothing at all, or doing it badly.


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The importance of mobile when marketing to physicians

The importance of mobile when marketing to physicians | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it

Today's professionals are increasingly mobile, and the world of healthcare is no exception. Mobile plays an important role in doctors' day-to-day tasks, including patient engagement, research, checking physician emails and scheduling. According to eMarketer, a Kantar Media study conducted in March 2015 showed among U.S. doctors polled, more than 80 percent use smartphones for work. Meanwhile, 56 percent use tablets.

Increased mobile usage within the healthcare world is optimizing doctor-patient relationships and has major implications for marketers aiming to reach physicians.

"More than 80 percent of doctors use smartphones for work."

Doctors are mobile and marketing should be, too
Physicians are inherently mobile in everything they do. It is rare to encounter a doctor who sits stationary at a desk; rather, doctors are moving from appointment to appointment, conducting hospital visits, taking breaks, going in and out of surgery and researching health-related topics in between it all.

As a result, doctors are more likely to depend on their mobile devices to complete daily tasks and create efficiencies within the work day. With these behaviors in mind, marketers would be wise to leverage mobile strategy as a priority when reaching out to doctors. 

Mobile EHR use is on the rise
One area of the healthcare world that is being optimized through mobile is how physicians access electronic health records. The latest Black Book Research poll underscored this trend, revealing 52 percent of all ambulatory practice physicians use a mobile device to access patient data or reference materials.

Mobile EHR is on the rise, which has implications for EHR vendors and manufacturers because it means physicians are constantly connected to their devices. Marketers are thus presented with a tremendous opportunity to reach doctors using their products and services in real time, whether through social media, text message subscriptions or email marketing.

Also, as U.S. doctors begin to see mobile as crucial to their daily operations, EHR manufacturers will need to structure their language and marketing tactics toward this demand. A study from peer60 – as cited by iHealthBeat – stated 20 percent of community hospitals are in the market to change their electronic health record vendors, and mobile optimization will surely play an important role in the decision-making process.

A nod toward medical email marketing
Both the increased presence of mobile technology in care-giving settings and the trend toward mobile EHR usage underscores the importance of email marketing to professionals within the medical field. As more doctors use mobile devices throughout the day, there is an opportunity to reach them through email. Additionally, there are greater demands on marketers to reach physicians using their preferred channel. 

Physicians aside, people are more likely to access email through mobile. Research conducted by Movable Ink showed about 67 percent of emails are opened using mobile devices, and it is not unlikely this number would increase when looking specifically at the mobile habits of physicians. Given that, it is crucial marketers optimize their email campaigns for mobile, as well as the sites and landing pages those emails direct the physicians to. Unfortunately, marketers have been slow to optimize their sites for mobile viewing, which creates a barrier between busy physicians and the calls to action they are presented with when reached through email. 

Mobile strategy is crucial to reaching doctors.

The importance of good data
Ultimately, the rise in mobile usage by physicians means marketers have a more robust pool of data to work with and an opportunity to improve their offerings before reaching out to their target markets. In order to conduct any mobile marketing campaign effectively, marketers must have accurate data to understand the types of medical professionals they are reaching.

In order to effectively market your company's mobile EHR offering, you need an organized database to help you contact the right people to gage a certain medical facility's interest in becoming mobile. The fact that doctors are checking email via mobile also gives marketers the opportunity to leverage mobile data use geo-targeting techniques to create more relevant email campaigns. Effective mobile strategies are made possible with the right audience information. Physician data makes it easier to email, target and market to the right people using customized, relevant messaging.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Une crème pour remplacer les comprimés de Viagra

Une crème pour remplacer les comprimés de Viagra | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Du Viagra en pommade ? Un nouveau traitement des troubles de l'érection, sous forme de crème à appliquer sur le pénis, va être délivré sur ordonnance médicale dans les pharmacies à partir du 1er juin, a annoncé le laboratoire français Majorelle.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Sexualité: Une crème alternative au Viagra en vente le 1er juin

Sexualité: Une crème alternative au Viagra en vente le 1er juin | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
La crème sera vendue sous le nom de Vitaros…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Troubles de l’érection : une crème-médicament arrive en pharmacie le 1er juin

Troubles de l’érection : une crème-médicament arrive en pharmacie le 1er juin | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
Plus rapide qu’un comprimé, moins désagréable qu’une injection. Une crème vient compléter l’offre des traitements des troubles de l’érection. Elle sera vendue à partir de juin..
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hupertan
Scoop.it!

Vitaros: La première crème pour favoriser l'érection

Ce traitement topique est une alternative au Viagra et aux injections locales…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from RX News | Articles for Bach RX Twitter Feed
Scoop.it!

American Urological Association issues 4 new clinical practice guidelines

The American Urological Association introduces new clinical guidelines for the treatment of overactive bladder, urodynamics, hematuria, and vasectomy.

Via Kevin Reese
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Hupertan from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
Scoop.it!

The Urology Care Foundation™ – Quality Online Patient Education Resources

The Urology Care Foundation™ – Quality Online Patient Education Resources | Social Media in Healthcare #SoMe | Scoop.it
The Urology Care Foundation™ has created robust educational materials for patients based upon the guidelines of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.