Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Why Building Relationships with Your Employees Is Better Than Just Managing Them

Why Building Relationships with Your Employees Is Better Than Just Managing Them | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
By creating strong relationships with your staff members, you'll build a better workforce and develop bonds that will help you and your business be a success.
donhornsby's insight:
Relationships should always be reciprocal. Unfortunately, they’ve become too much about getting without giving. Real relationships can’t be about something that exists for our own benefit or getting a return on an agreement to work together in any capacity, be it a mentorship or a contractual agreement. They’re about perpetuating the momentum that each person brings to the relationship. 

 The same must be true in leadership: It should never be one-sided, nor should the leader always be the one generating the ideas or making the decisions. Leadership means actively listening and advancing the ideas of others (and injecting recommendations along the way to further strengthen or add value to them). If you’re the type of leader who needs all the attention, you won’t seek to cultivate wisdom in others.
 
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Conflict at Work? Empathy Can Smooth Ruffled Feathers

Conflict at Work? Empathy Can Smooth Ruffled Feathers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Researchers found that forgiveness was more likely to occur when a victim actively empathized with the person who inflicted the perceived harm.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): “Before you can even offer forgiveness, there needs to be some kind of mutual understanding of the transgression,” Professor Adams said. If that can be achieved, then forgiveness can help both parties move forward, she said.
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5 Things You Can Do To Improve Your Relationship With Your Boss (And Your Next Boss)

5 Things You Can Do To Improve Your Relationship With Your Boss (And Your Next Boss) | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The most important driver of employee engagement is the relationship they have with their immediate manager.


Via The Learning Factor, Jose Luis Anzizar, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

“A great boss changes your career. Carefully consider your boss and be prepared to take an ‘innovator’ role yourself–it’s not just up to them to reveal themselves it’s up to you to ask the questions.”

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:29 PM

As offices across the country close out a week marked by celebrations of "Boss's Day," now is a great time to consider your relationship with your current boss--could it be improved, or maximized in some way?

David Hain's curator insight, October 20, 2014 3:02 AM

Relationship matters - and relationships do matter!

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The Cost of Distrust

The Cost of Distrust | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Distrust commands a very handsome price. It destroys initiative, damages relationships, creates a toxic environment and reduces competitiveness.
donhornsby's insight:
What if I told you that mistrust could kill our individual aspirations, cripple our personal and business relationships, strip the muscle from our most powerful leaders, and crush the productivity and morale of our best and brightest people? Would I have your attention? Then why don’t we give trust the attention it deserves?
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 2, 2016 2:05 PM
Trust is earned. Parker Palmer said authority (trust) is authored in the words and actions of a person. My experience is there is not much trust in schools.
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How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation

How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How can you mentally prepare for a difficult conversation? You’ll want to think about the logistics (where and when you meet) and your strategy (how will you frame the problem and what you’ll say first). But getting ready emotionally is perhaps the most important work you need to do before you get into the room. Here are a few things you can go do to get ready.

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Susan David, a psychologist and coauthor of the Harvard Business Review article Emotional Agility, says that “suppressing your emotions — deciding not to say something when you’re upset—can lead to bad results.” She explains that if you don’t express your emotions, they’re likely to show up elsewhere. Psychologists call this emotional leakage. “Have you ever yelled at your spouse or child after a frustrating day at work—a frustration that had nothing to do with him or her? When you bottle up your feelings, you’re likely to express your emotions in unintended ways instead, either sarcastically or in a completely different context. Suppressing your emotions is associated with poor memory, difficulties in relationships, and physiological costs (such as cardiovascular health problems),” David explains. Prevent your emotions from seeping out — in the conversation or at home — by getting your feelings out ahead of time. That way, you’ll be more centered and calm when you’re having the discussion. You may be wondering, Do I really need to do this for one 10-minute conversation? While it takes some time (though it will get easier the more you do it), there is a huge payoff. You’ll go into the conversation with the right mindset, feeling confident, knowing what you want to achieve.
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Are You a Poor Communicator? Stop the Damage and Improve Relationships

Are You a Poor Communicator? Stop the Damage and Improve Relationships | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

"Communication – the human connection – is the key to personal and career success."
– Paul J. Meyer

 

Most of us engage in communication every day. Most of us also know that communicating with others can be a difficult and frustrating experience.

 

There are times when we mean well, but because of the way we say what we say, our message is misunderstood, with unintended and undesirable consequences.

 

Below are four of the most common mistakes we can make in interpersonal communication, which often lead to conflict and worsening of relationships.

 

The good news is that once we become aware of these poor habits, we can change the way we communicate, resulting in improved relationships. This article focuses mainly on recognizing ineffective communication.

 

For tips on effective communication, see links to resources posted below.


Via Dimitris Agorastos, David Hain
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