Surviving Leaders...
Follow
Find tag "neuroscience"
52.5K views | +8 today
Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
Curated by donhornsby
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Moving your hands could change what you hear

Moving your hands could change what you hear | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How we perceive sound can be altered by whether we are using our left or right hands while listening according to researchers at Georgetown University Medical Centre.


The results -- which were presented at Neuroscience 2012 -- are being attributed to the different language processing abilities of the left and right hemispheres of the brain which control the right and left sides of the body respectively.

 

To investigate the phenomenon neurologist Peter Turkeltaub and his team disguised rapid- and slow-changing sounds within background noise. Participants were asked to indicate whether they could hear the noise by pressing a button using alternately their right hand then their left hands.

Those responding with their right hand heard the rapidly changing sounds more often than when using their left hands while the slowly changing sounds were heard more often when using the left hand.

 

"The left hemisphere likes rapidly changing sounds, such as consonants, and the right hemisphere likes slowly changing sounds, such as syllables or intonation," explains Turkeltaub on the GUMC website.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Broad Canvas
Scoop.it!

Rest is a key part of life

Rest is a key part of life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable but elusive part of life, U.S. researchers said.

 

The lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable but elusive part of life, U.S. researchers said.

 

Psychological scientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, a professor of the University of Southern California, and colleagues reviewed the existing scientific literature from neuroscience and psychological science about the brain "at rest."


Via Sakis Koukouvis, David Hulme
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Science News
Scoop.it!

On writing, memory, and forgetting: Socrates and Hemingway take on Zeigarnik

On writing, memory, and forgetting: Socrates and Hemingway take on Zeigarnik | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Your mind wants to know what comes next. It wants to finish. It wants to keep working – and it will keep working even if you tell it to stop. All through those other tasks, it will subconsciously be remembering the ones it never got to complete.

 

I would never give up the ability to record, to access, to research endless topics at the click of a button. But, with Hemingway and Socrates never far from mind, I may be slightly more cautious about how I use that ability.


The Zeigarnik effect is a powerful motivating force. And a motivated mind is a mind that is much more capable of thought and accomplishment – even if it does sometimes need to use a cheat sheet to remember just what it wanted to include, be it in a story or an order. I, for one, know that I will always prefer a waiter who writes my order down to one that remembers it—however urgently—all in his head.

 

Articles about MEMORY: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=memory

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
GranGoddessa's comment, May 1, 2012 6:45 PM
I truly enjoyed reading this excellent article! Sakis, thank you once again! :)
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 2, 2012 2:23 AM
Welcome @dj Goddessa :-)
Rescooped by donhornsby from Science News
Scoop.it!

Liking Someone Affects How Your Brain Processes the Way They Move

Liking Someone Affects How Your Brain Processes the Way They Move | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Liking someone can affect the way your brain processes their actions, according to scientists.

 

Researchers said that watching someone else move usually causes a 'mirroring' effect. The mirroring effect is when parts of the brain responsible for motor skills are activated by watching someone else in action.

 

The latest findings, published in the journal PLoS ONE, shows that your feelings toward the person you're watching can actually affect the activity in the part of your brain responsible for motor actions, and can for example lead to "differential processing" like thinking the person you dislike is moving slower than they actually are.


"We address the basic question of whether social factors influence our perception of simple actions," researcher Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an assistant professor with the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC and the Division of Occupational Science, said in a statement. "These results indicate that an abstract sense of group membership, and not only differences in physical appearance, can affect basic sensory-motor processing," she added.

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Science News
Scoop.it!

How is our consciousness connected to the world?

How is our consciousness connected to the world? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How is our consciousness connected to the world?
Explore the unconscious functions of the brain with visual illusions and mysterious perceptual phenomena.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Insight and Understanding
Scoop.it!

Book shows intuition isn't everything in making good decisions

Book shows intuition isn't everything in making good decisions | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

We like to think of ourselves as rational beings, capable of making objective decisions about life. The truth, says Daniel Kahneman, is that we have some faulty wiring in our ability to make judgments and choices.

 

We human beings aren’t as smart as we think we are. We aren’t as rational as we would like to believe we are. Furthermore, we are too confident in our own abilities and we put too much faith in our intuition.

 

Ask author Daniel Kahneman, and he should know. He has devoted his entire life to figuring out what makes us act the way we do, and make the decisions we make.


Via Seth Capo
more...
No comment yet.