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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
Curated by donhornsby
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The Shockingly Simple Change That Can Improve All of Your Relationships

The Shockingly Simple Change That Can Improve All of Your Relationships | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
How Smartphones Affect Relationships - The Muse: A quick and impactful way to make your personal...

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Occasionally, I’ll miss an important email or return a call a little late. However, nothing has happened that’s made me regret not checking my phone. I may be a little harder to reach virtually, but in-person? I’m all yours—and my personal and professional relationships have never been better.

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Do LinkedIn Endorsements Really Matter?

Do LinkedIn Endorsements Really Matter? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Like them or not, they're worth paying attention to.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Of course, LinkedIn is more than a platform for being found; it’s also a way to stay in touch with your network. One way to do this is to recommend people on LinkedIn—though that process does require a bit of thought and effort. Giving endorsements, on the other hand, is an easy, low-effort way of keeping in touch and regularly engaging with your contacts. Think of it as just sending little notes that say, “I remember you! You’re awesome!” Sounds simple, but it never hurts to generate some goodwill before you need it.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:41 AM

(From the article) Think about endorsements as new and improved keywords. LinkedIn automatically defaults to ranking your skills by the number of endorsements you have, but to get more endorsements for the skills you want to emphasize, rearrange your list and move those skills higher. Also, if you’re getting endorsed for random things or for things you don’t want to be endorsed for, you can always hide either the entire skill or the particular endorser. Just set your profile to edit mode and you’ll see a little demo in the Skills and Endorsements section showing you how to edit it.

 
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:18 PM

I agree with @donhornsby on this.  I know there are skeptics when it comes to LI endorsements but I think they are meaningful. 

Josie Gibson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 10:25 PM

Senior executives need to take such social tools seriously, for a variety of reasons.

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6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy

6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

When something that someone is doing annoys or irritates us, it is actually something about ourselves that we are not fully aware of.



Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

Now when we are in the midst of our annoyance with a co-worker, friend or even our significant other, we can simmer down and remember they are just mirroring to us what we want to change in ourselves. We rejoice knowing this “annoyance” can bring us happiness, if we choose it.

6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy 

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Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes

Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Talking about differences of opinion or offenses doesn't need to be as difficult as we make it. When you know how to have these conversations, you don't have to fear them. And your relationships can be even better after having them.

 

When we're caught off-guard, we're more likely to fall back into old, ineffective habits like the combat mentality. If you're not the one initiating the tough conversation, or if a problem erupts out of nowhere, stick to these basics: keep your content clear, keep your tone neutral, and keep your phrasing temperate. When disagreements flare, you'll be more likely to navigate to a productive outcome – and emerge with your reputation intact.


Via Gina Stepp
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The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist

The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Research shows that thinking like an optimist pays off big—not just when it comes to your salary, but for your health, relationships, and your overall well-being.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Optimists Have Happier 9 to 5s

People who see a glass that's half full tend to rate their jobs as more satisfying than those who don't. A study from Kuwait University found that people who were the most optimistic were also happiest in their jobs and had the fewest work complaints; the opposite was true for pessimists.

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Maintaining a Personal Touch in a Wired World

Maintaining a Personal Touch in a Wired World | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Living in a wired world continues to make us lose our personal touch. Learn how to stay connected and retain your personal touch when communicating.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): I make a habit of putting my phone in my bag or a drawer when I am meeting with someone. In fact, I often won’t take the phone into the room when going to a meeting. I am the kind of person that will check my phone if it’s in front of me, which is why I remove the distraction. And if I have to take my phone into a meeting because I am waiting for something urgent, I always ensure it is on silent.

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How to Always Leave a Great First Impression

How to Always Leave a Great First Impression | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why the First Impression Matters The first impression is obviously the first thing that occurs in any social interaction. Do you convey confidence? Self-assurance?

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): When you meet someone, there are things you should always take into account, such as the context of the meeting (personal or business) and what they are doing at the moment of initiation. You should tweak your approaches based on these two things. When in a more casual and personal setting, you probably don’t want to be as formal as you would with a new potential employer. Also, you never want to make someone stop everything they’re doing just to speak to you if you’ve never met them before. It’s rude, and no one likes to be interrupted.

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