Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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3 Practices To Become A Great Listener

3 Practices To Become A Great Listener | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Ineffective listening can lead to damaged relationships, inefficient use of time and energy, and silos between key people in an organization. Here's how to improve your listening skills - fast!
donhornsby's insight:
Safety, belonging, and mattering are essential to your brain and your ability to perform at work, at home, and in life overall. In every communication, we are subconsciously reinforcing or reaching out for more safety, belonging, and mattering. So the net-net is to truly be a great listener we attempt to step into what it’s like to be the other person. Try the three above steps and you’ll find your interactions will be more fun and more fulfilling too! 
 
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Leadership In A Bubble: CEO Listening Is Harder Than It Sounds

Leadership In A Bubble: CEO Listening Is Harder Than It Sounds | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
CEOs need to get out of the "bubble" where all information confirms their beliefs, as a recent HBR article argued. But random questions are not as valuable as gathering information about the company's key assumptions.
donhornsby's insight:
Getting out of the bubble is as important as the HBR article claims it is, but getting structured information will help the business leader understand what, if anything, needs to be changed in response to the information.
 
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Why You Should Speak Less and Listen More

Why You Should Speak Less and Listen More | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Speaking less and listening more can quickly turn a conversation about what’s wrong into a conversation about what we can do to make things better.

Via Kevin Watson, Roy Sheneman, PhD
donhornsby's insight:
Keep in mind that silence as an act of leadership is far from passive — it is an act of actively and generously listening. It requires the discipline of listening for what is needed to contribute to progress or make a difference in the things that matter most in this moment. It requires being present to what is vs. how you would like things to be. Sometimes the best thing a leader can do is let people speak up and speak out, despite their personal feelings about what is being said or how it is being said.
 
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Improve Your Listening: 15 Tips to Improve Your Listening 

Improve Your Listening: 15 Tips to Improve Your Listening  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Improve your listening with these 15 tips from a communications expert.

Via Bobby Dillard
donhornsby's insight:
Avoid faking attention and pretending to listen 

The unique challenge that comes with learning to listen well is that we now know how to fake it. But when someone thinks you were paying attention but in reality you weren’t, you are inviting trouble. If the speaker notices, you are insulting him/her. If you are asked to respond in some way, then you will be caught unawares and will most likely suffer embarrassment. And even if you can get away with it, you are gaining nothing except the reinforcement of bad habits.
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Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool

Listening Is an Overlooked Leadership Tool | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“What do you think?”

I ask this question a lot. My team knows that when they come to me with a question, this is likely the question I’ll come back with first. Sometimes I even preface it with, “I don’t know.” As leaders in our organizations, it’s up to us to coach colleagues and our employees through finding that answer. More often than not, when I ask this question, my team has a better answer than I do — or one that I hadn’t thought about before.

It can be a powerful technique, especially if there is no single right answer – a situation that will be familiar to anyone doing leading-edge work. But it only works in an organization that values listening.

Via David Hain
donhornsby's insight:
So how can we listen more? 

Three suggestions to try this week: 

 Look people in the eye. Sherry Turkle, a professor at MIT who studies the psychology of online connectivity, wisely wrote in her recent book Reclaiming Conversation, “We face a significant choice. It is not about giving up our phones but about using them with greater intention. Conversation is there for us to reclaim.” Put down your phone when you’re in meetings. Close your laptop. See if you’re more energized about work and the people with whom you work. 

 Create space in your day. Manage your calendar and stop booking yourself out the entire day. Can someone on your team be part of that meeting? Does it need to be an hour, or can 30 minutes suffice? Give yourself time for reflection and space throughout the day, so that when you are talking with someone, you can give them your full attention. 

 Ask more questions. Next time a colleague or employee asks for advice, make sure you’re listening and understand the situation. Then, before answering, ask a question. Clarify what they really need — usually it’s just validation that their thinking is on the right track.
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David Hain's curator insight, May 27, 2016 7:09 AM

Listening matters - here's the why and some hows!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 28, 2016 10:27 AM

Totally agree.

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Don't just listen to, listen through 

Don't just listen to, listen through  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to others.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:05 AM
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:28 AM
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…

Via Karen Dietz
donhornsby's insight:

(From the artlcle): “What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.”

 

-John Maeda,



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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Why Listening Is So Much More Than Hearing

Why Listening Is So Much More Than Hearing | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Hearing, for the most part, is a no-brainer. When we listen, that’s when the neurons really fire.

 

HERE’S a trick question. What do you hear right now?

 

If your home is like mine, you hear the humming sound of a printer, the low throbbing of traffic from the nearby highway and the clatter of plastic followed by the muffled impact of paws landing on linoleum — meaning that the cat has once again tried to open the catnip container atop the fridge and succeeded only in knocking it to the kitchen floor.

 

The slight trick in the question is that, by asking you what you were hearing, I prompted your brain to take control of the sensory experience — and made you listen rather than just hear. That, in effect, is what happens when an event jumps out of the background enough to be perceived consciously rather than just being part of your auditory surroundings. The difference between the sense of hearing and the skill of listening is attention.


Via F. Thunus
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The Twelve Absolutes of Leadership

The Twelve Absolutes of Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Gary Burnison considers leadership to be a privilege. Most people like the idea of leadership but few count the cost. He says, “To lead is to be all in, transparent and accessible, calm in the face of upset and even crisis, and always mindful that you are a steward of something bigger than yourself.” That’s not easy. To whom much is given much is required. That’s the part that easily trips us up.

 

His book, The Twelve Absolutes of Leadership offers insight from his lifetime in leadership, interacting with some of the world's top leaders in the C-suite and boardrooms, as well as heads of state.

 

He offers a framework based on fundamental human truths and the essential elements of leadership. The “Absolutes” are building blocks that must be present regardless of your leadership style or approach.

 

Here are the 12 Absolutes with Burnison’s thoughts on each:...


Via Gary Morrison, AlGonzalezinfo
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Bursting Out of the CEO Bubble

Bursting Out of the CEO Bubble | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why executives should talk less and ask more questions
donhornsby's insight:
“Quiet time increases the likelihood of asking the right questions.”
 
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Characteristics of a Good Listener 

Characteristics of a Good Listener  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
I was at a dinner and someone told me, “if you are even thinking of a response while someone is talking, then you aren’t really listening.” I thought about it a lot afterwards. For a long time I felt…

Via Bobby Dillard
donhornsby's insight:
If you are even thinking of a response while someone is talking, then you aren’t really listening.
 
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If You Ask A Question, You Gotta Listen To The Answer 

If You Ask A Question, You Gotta Listen To The Answer  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

In his book, Great Leaders Ask Questions: A Fortune 100 List, Bob Tiede suggests stimulating questions that will spawn thought and generate conversation in a myriad of situations. It’s practical. And it made me think that if I ask a question, I had better listen to the answer! 

 
donhornsby's insight:
For that to happen we must ask thoughtful questions AND listen to the answers. In response, we must serve well. And then, we all will benefit. - 
 
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The One Leadership Skill You Need To Succeed 

The One Leadership Skill You Need To Succeed  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

There is one leadership skill that will influence your overall success more than any other. If you develop it well, your potential grows enormously—but if you don’t bother to learn it can end up costing you a great deal. 

donhornsby's insight:
Don’t be silent for the sake of listening; listen for the sake of understanding. 

Lead from Within: before you talk, listen. Before you react, think. Before you fix, elevate. Before you lead, learn. 

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Are You A Good Listener?

Are You A Good Listener? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

We hear a lot about how to speak well in public, but very little about how to learn the equally important art of listening properly to others. This video describes four steps to becoming a good listener.


Via Ariana Amorim, Bobby Dillard
donhornsby's insight:
There are many books on how to be a good speaker. But there are few lessons in how to become a good listener. This is a helpful look at this important subject.
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The price of poor listening

The price of poor listening | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Hearing and understanding someone else's point of view is a learned skill that requires effort. But it's one we all need to make. Because poor listening leads to misunderstandings, errors, bad decisions, loss of team cohesion and costly mistakes.

Via Kevin Watson, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Try this process the next time you encounter a difference of opinion. It requires much patience and a strong desire to truly understand, but the result is almost always better working relationships, better decisions, and a better bottom line.

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Hey Leaders! Listening Isn't Easy, But It's Essential

Hey Leaders! Listening Isn't Easy, But It's Essential | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

We create our own barriers to active listening, and our performance suffers accordingly.


Via Karen Dietz
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The failure to truly listen is a big barrier to high performance and performance improvement for most leaders and their teams. It takes deliberate effort to focus, get in the moment and strive to understand before moving to judgment. Starting today, use every encounter as an opportunity to strengthen your focus and understanding. Get this right and you’ll transform your own effectiveness and the effectiveness of those looking to you for leadership.

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ozziegontang's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:52 PM

Karen's insights say it well.

Karen Dietz's comment, February 14, 2013 8:07 AM
Thank you Denyse, Al, and Ozzie for re-scooping and commenting!
Renee Stuart's curator insight, February 14, 2013 10:30 PM

Are you just hearing others or truly listening to others?

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Best Ideas? They Can Come From Anyone – IF You’re Willing to Listen

Best Ideas? They Can Come From Anyone – IF You’re Willing to Listen | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“Don’t credit me with that success. That idea came from a janitor at the NFL Films production facility.

 

That statement was from Steve Sabol, the late co-founder (with his father, Ed) of NFL Films. NFL Films was started by accident by his father from his love for home movies. Steve recently passed away from cancer, but his thoughts were captured in a documentary on how they built their organization

 

Have you ever seen the segment where all the fumbles and hits are compiled into a popular show of its own?

 

As a matter of fact, it has become a brand itself within the company franchise.

 

And, that idea came from possibly the lowest person on the org chart.


Via F. Thunus
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