Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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"You matter" -- when's the last time you told someone this? 

"You matter" -- when's the last time you told someone this?  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“You matter” drives outcomes, and it may even surprise you how much exhibiting it will make you feel like YOU matter.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): During my executive tenure, I made mistakes I’ll remember for a long time. As an example, there were times I was known to “look through people” when I was processing information or solving a business problem. Not exactly the kind of stuff that puts you in the leadership hall of fame. While I truly cared about my team (and still do), my actions didn’t always express it. So let me ask you, are your actions expressing you care? 

My haircut isn’t just a haircut. It’s in an environment that should be emulated everywhere in the business world. After all, when you’re no longer on this planet, people aren’t going to measure you by the things you did — they’re going to measure you by the quality of your relationships. I know all of this may seem squishy and soft, but it’s transformative to life and business. “You matter” drives outcomes, and it may even surprise you how much exhibiting it will make you feel like you matter.
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5 Surprising Habits of Really Likeable People

5 Surprising Habits of Really Likeable People | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Want to be that person who makes and keeps friends easily? Then make a habit of being really likeable.
donhornsby's insight:
A helpful and quick read!

(From the article): Ever wonder what makes some people much more liked than others in social settings? Or why there are certain people that can win over multiple friends without so much as a second thought? Turns out, it's not all natural talent--there are some secrets to the trade as well. Want to become more likable? Read on for 5 habits of immensely likable people.
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"Forgive and Live" to Increase Personal Mastery 

"Forgive and Live" to Increase Personal Mastery  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Holding onto anger prevents you from reaching your full potential at work and in your personal life. Instead of "Forgive and Forget," try "Forgive and Live"
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): You cannot reach your full potential if you are partially stuck in the past. Although you might move forward in some areas, a part of you stays stuck in a certain spot, spinning your wheels, going over what happened. And people who devote their energy toward making another person accountable or exacting revenge marry their misery.

 “Not forgiving is like drinking rat poison and then waiting for the rat to die.” Anne Lamott, Traveling Mercies
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How to Say “Sorry” in Customer Experience Failures

How to Say “Sorry” in Customer Experience Failures | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Saying “sorry” is not admitting defeat. It’s admitting you’re human. Customers like that. Beloved companies regularly practice this important peace process. It makes them grow.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Do you have the courage? Are you doing the apology well? When things go wrong, are you nimble enough to spring into action, identify the issue, plan a recovery and implement it within one day? How about within hours? Is your customer recovery plan as robust and practiced as your IT recovery plan? Beloved companies turn “recovery” into an opportunity that says to customers “Who else would respond this way?” They are zealots about recovering customer goodwill. They know that the measure of a company is determined in these moments. And they obsess over every moment of these situations, because they know that customers are keeping score. Do you delivery “sorry” well? The measure of your company is determined in the moments from the time something happens to the time it takes to recover, to just how you recover. What’s your story? Do you purposefully craft the story you want the market to know about your humility and remorse in challenging situations?
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Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership

Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Of 33,000 workers globally, one in three said they don't trust their employer. What gives?
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): One in three people don’t trust their employer. That’s according to the new Edelman "Trust Barometer", a survey of 33,000 people in 28 countries about trust in the workplace.

 Among the other notable findings, trust decreases down an organization’s hierarchy: 64% of executives, 51% of managers, and 48% of rank and file staff say they trust their organizations, and employees say they trust peers more than CEOs when it comes to company information. Right now, many workers have their choice of jobs that boast high earnings and a range of career opportunities. To stay competitive in the war for talent, most employers are offering a full complement of benefits and perks as well as beefing up their efforts to engage workers through inclusion initiatives. Indeed, many employees among the Top 100 Great Places To Work reported being satisfied with their jobs, but also having a high level of trust for their companies.

 That’s obviously not the case everywhere, according to the Edelman Trust Barometer. The survey revealed gaps between factors that employees rate as important for building trust and how their leaders rated based on those attributes.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 11:21 PM
When we conflate management and leadership, treating them as the same thing, we make the mistake of missing what leading is. It cannot be defined, but, when we see it, we recognize it.
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How Your Leadership Skills Will Determine Your Company Culture

How Your Leadership Skills Will Determine Your Company Culture | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Think about the culture you want to build, then master these leadership skills. The rest will fall into place.
donhornsby's insight:
(from the article) - But consider what Bridgewater is going for: It wants employees to feel that hard work is recognized, and that the company values transparency. Find ways to bring those traits into your workplace -- because when an employee feels comfortable enough to challenge you, and you’re able to turn that into a lesson in leadership, then you’ve created a culture in which everyone can do their best work. 
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You’ve Got to Serve Someone

You’ve Got to Serve Someone | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Servant leadership is not a new concept. Robert Greenleaf introduced the idea back in 1977. In recent years, however, concrete evidence has emerged that the approach delivers more than warm, fuzzy feelings. Last month, the first quantitative study that begins to explain a connection between servant leadership and improved individual performance was published by researchers in Canada. This new evidence may help move servant leadership from a niche practice to one adopted by more executives.


Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 16, 1:01 PM
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up. This is a concept that is long overdue. If we practiced the hard work of true servant-leadership in schools, what a difference that would make.
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Signs You’re Burning Out (And How To Stop It)

Signs You’re Burning Out (And How To Stop It) | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Even the best jobs can lead to burnout. The harder you work and the more motivated you are to succeed, the easier it is to get in over your head. The prevalence of burnout is increasing as technology
donhornsby's insight:
All I can say is, based on my experience, this article is spot on!

(From the article): Lean on your support system. It’s tempting to withdraw from other people when you’re feeling stressed, but they can be powerful allies in the war against burnout. Sympathetic family and friends are capable of helping you. Spending time with people who care about you helps you to remove yourself from the stresses of work and reminds you to live a little and have fun.
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nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 16, 8:07 AM
All I can say is, based on my experience, this article is spot on!

(From the article): Lean on your support system. It’s tempting to withdraw from other people when you’re feeling stressed, but they can be powerful allies in the war against burnout. Sympathetic family and friends are capable of helping you. Spending time with people who care about you helps you to remove yourself from the stresses of work and reminds you to live a little and have fun.
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Are You an Alpha Male Leader?

Are You an Alpha Male Leader? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
When drive, competitiveness and commitment are too much.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article) There is a place for alpha-like behaviour in organisations which need the drive, competitiveness and commitment of such leaders. However this should be balanced with models of leadership that connect, build and nurture. Once this has been achieved, organisations like Amazon (named as one of the most stressful companies to work for) will discover that employees who work without fear can be driven to new heights.
 

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Wise Leader™'s curator insight, March 11, 5:02 AM
(From the article) There is a place for alpha-like behaviour in organisations which need the drive, competitiveness and commitment of such leaders. However this should be balanced with models of leadership that connect, build and nurture. Once this has been achieved, organisations like Amazon (named as one of the most stressful companies to work for) will discover that employees who work without fear can be driven to new heights.
 

nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 11, 7:46 AM
(From the article) There is a place for alpha-like behaviour in organisations which need the drive, competitiveness and commitment of such leaders. However this should be balanced with models of leadership that connect, build and nurture. Once this has been achieved, organisations like Amazon (named as one of the most stressful companies to work for) will discover that employees who work without fear can be driven to new heights.
 

Jaro Berce's curator insight, March 15, 6:17 AM
(From the article) There is a place for alpha-like behaviour in organisations which need the drive, competitiveness and commitment of such leaders. However this should be balanced with models of leadership that connect, build and nurture. Once this has been achieved, organisations like Amazon (named as one of the most stressful companies to work for) will discover that employees who work without fear can be driven to new heights.
 

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Don't just listen to, listen through 

Don't just listen to, listen through  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to others.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, March 9, 6:05 AM
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 5:28 AM
(From the article): Effective leadership requires a high level of emotional intelligence that enables us to understand how the things we say and do come across to those around us. That said, it’s easy to say “don’t be that guy” when somebody says something offensive; what’s more difficult is preventing “that guy” from knocking us off our own game.
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The Power Of Thank You

The Power Of Thank You | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The two most important words that inspire action are thank you.   

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): So say thank you every day – Not just to your unsung heroes who help you, but also to your peers, supervisors, customers, friends and children. Don’t take them for granted. Write a personal note. Take them to lunch. Send them a small gift. Acknowledge the good things that they do and the difference they make.

 

Most of all – do it sincerely. You’ll be impressed with the actions that follow.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 23, 1:37 PM

I found thank you along with greeting students and parents and acknowledging my errors were important in my pedagogic relationships.

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Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had

Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

An organization is a reflection of its leadership. According to a Gallup poll, 50 percent of Americans have left a job because of a bad employer-employee relationship. So it’s fair to say that being a better boss improves employee retention and the overall product, right?

 

Both of those goals can be met by authority figures being the same bosses to themselves as they are to employees. A manager can model the kind of behavior he wants his employees to display by consistently employing these five practices:

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Admit your mistakes.

By that same token, own up to your own faults to show your employees that you’re not perfect. More people will trust you because you are willing to be vulnerable.

Answer to your mistakes, fulfill your responsibilities, and expect your employees to do the same. This tactic shows your workers that:

You live by the same expectations you have for them.You are the example by which they should work.They each play an integral role on the team.If they fail to perform their duties or functions, then the whole team suffers.They contribute across all aspects of the business.

Errors happen, even if you’d rather they didn’t. If managers want to minimize their employees’ work-related mistakes, then they have a responsibility to shine a light on their own missteps.

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The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work

The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

When we try to do things in a rush, we are usually destined to fail from the start — something I learned from my own mistakes. Faster doesn’t necessarily mean better.


Via David Hain, Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Being a patient listener allows us to absorb the full message, both spoken and unspoken. Being patiently mindful of the speaker’s every gesture, facial expression, and change in tone allows for a fuller understanding of the underlying issues.

TIME ALLOWS FOR SMARTER DECISIONS.

The best ideas seldom come to mind immediately. The longer we take to ponder a problem, the easier our brains may find it to fit everything into place. It is often in the quiet moments when inspiration strikes, and it hardly ever happens when we are desperate to make a decision. An attitude of patience helps us to smooth over those inevitable bumps in the road, and we usually reach the best path in our own time.

 

Any decision can be made quickly, but the consequences of those choices live for much longer. We live in a world where split-second decisions and decisive actions are constantly encouraged at our workplaces. How much smoother would things be if we all took the time to make the right decision the first time? It is all too easy to be hijacked by pressures and emotions and rushed into a hasty mistake.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 1, 6:26 AM

“The strongest of all warriors are these two — Time and Patience" ~ Tolstoy, HT @faisal_hoque

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 11, 5:07 PM

Patience allows us to pause and listen closely to others, the world, and ourselves.

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How Abraham Lincoln Mastered Collaboration: 4 Key Elements

How Abraham Lincoln Mastered Collaboration: 4 Key Elements | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Do executive leaders always have a clear idea of what powerful collaboration looks like? Do they always understand what it takes to build high-quality, result-focused collaboration between and across teams? What can we learn from Abraham Lincoln when it comes to collaboration? Read mor
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Why did Lincoln, hurt and humiliated to the bone, sat down on his pride when he needed a Secretary of War? Why did he call Stanton to the White House six years later? Because he had seen how talented he was, and knew he would be the right man for the job. Now that’s collaborative leadership. That is why Lincoln still sets a great example for executive leaders, and indeed all of us, today.
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But What If My Team Doesn't Want to Change? 

But What If My Team Doesn't Want to Change?  | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Change requires confidence and inclusion, not selling. When you can take your audacious vision and make it feel real, practical, and achievable, your team will sail along with you. 

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): No one wants stuff done to them, or even for them. With them goes a lot further. Ask employees, “What’s working well and how do we leverage it? What enhancements do we need? Where should we head next?” All these questions go a long way. Include employees by involving them in your change efforts. 
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 14, 10:14 AM
Change happens. It goes on all the time, often unnoticed. It takes leadership without micro-managing and coercing people to follow. Good listening and being present are keys.
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Evolving Leadership in the Digital Age

Evolving Leadership in the Digital Age | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Today leaders face added complications of rapidly changing technology, virtual working teams separated by cultural and geographical boundaries, and the difficulties of making decisions when faced with an overload of information.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article):  Leadership success today has to do with the way people think, the way they feel, the way they behave in a responsible manner. This is more than charisma and it is not something that can be learned in three easy steps or over a single programme. Strong leadership requires continuous development. Clever people don’t necessarily become wise. But they can learn how to find ways to cope with stressful experiences by getting to know themselves. It’s always good to keep in mind that leaders are like wine. Some turn out great; others may turn into vinegar! 
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, April 13, 10:05 AM

We have moved from the “Command, Control, Compartmentalisation” way of leading organisations to a more interactive, informative, and Innovation-oriented model. To be truly effective, today’s organisations need to have leaders who have the emotional intelligence to create meaning, and have the capability to inspire and empower their people to get things done.

Steve Bax's curator insight, April 14, 4:46 AM
Excellent blog scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen. 
I like the quote: "Leadership has become a team sport". 
The final paragraph is also worth highlighting here:
"Leadership success today has to do with the way people think, the way they feel, the way they behave in a responsible manner. This is more than charisma and it is not something that can be learned in three easy steps or over a single programme. Strong leadership requires continuous development. Clever people don’t necessarily become wise. But they can learn how to find ways to cope with stressful experiences by getting to know themselves. It’s always good to keep in mind that leaders are like wine. Some turn out great; others may turn into vinegar!"
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Confidence Is Essential When You Really Don't Know What You Are Doing

Confidence Is Essential When You Really Don't Know What You Are Doing | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Nobody has ever been as good at something the first time as they become the hundredth time. To start, you simply have to believe you can do it.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Consciously decide to do one thing that you are not good at. Pretend that you are a complete natural at whatever it is you need to learn. Do it confidently and know that you will make mistakes but more importantly you will learn. Remember, anyone watching will simply think you know what you are doing.
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8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think

8 Reasons Why Money's Not Worth What You Think | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Money’s not worth what you think. In fact, many people are poor because the only thing they have is money. If you live for money, it’s time to get a life.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Are you willing to cash in your personal dignity for more money? Some people are consumed with seeking the approval of others. The most important person to satisfy, however, is you. It’s your life. So do your best. Be your own person. And remember, you’re not finished until you do yourself proud. As the author John Mason said, “You were born an original. Don’t die a copy.” — It’s time to be the real you.
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A Life Changing Experiment Anyone can Do

A Life Changing Experiment Anyone can Do | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It might be slow, but complacency is death. The danger of complacency is you don’t see your own smug self-satisfaction. In dying organizations, “I’ve got it all together and I don’t need to change,” is desired and admired. Why do you look up to the dead? Complacent leaders think of others, not themselves, when conversations turn…
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Personal transformation precedes influencing change in others. If you want others to change, grow yourself. Gandhi said, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” For leaders, personal transformation is the ultimate challenge. Successful leaders grow and change first. Leaders who aren’t growing and changing are on a slow march to oblivion.
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Roger Francis's curator insight, March 23, 3:46 AM
(From the article): Personal transformation precedes influencing change in others. If you want others to change, grow yourself. Gandhi said, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” For leaders, personal transformation is the ultimate challenge. Successful leaders grow and change first. Leaders who aren’t growing and changing are on a slow march to oblivion.
nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 30, 1:22 PM
(From the article): Personal transformation precedes influencing change in others. If you want others to change, grow yourself. Gandhi said, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” For leaders, personal transformation is the ultimate challenge. Successful leaders grow and change first. Leaders who aren’t growing and changing are on a slow march to oblivion.
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The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note

The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Super salespeople excel at writing thank you notes. That’s why they stay at the top of their game and drive BMWs.

But those who don’t live by commissions — or don’t earn the commissions or salary they want — could learn a thing or two about the impact of the tools used by those with star power.

Especially when such tools cost no more than the price of a stamp or take no more effort than clicking a button!


Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 16, 12:59 PM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 17, 7:16 AM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
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Are Our Leaders Losing their Humility?

Are Our Leaders Losing their Humility? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Whatever happened to humility as a virtue for leaders?


Via David Hain, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Humility derives from an inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work.

Humility is an essential quality for authentic leaders. People trust them because they know they are genuine, honest, and sincere. Lacking those qualities, people live in fear and doubt – not exactly the ingredients to bring out the best in people. In difficult times, people rely on humble leaders even more to get them through crises.

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nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 11, 7:45 AM

A plea for more humble leaders, seconded here!

Martin McGaha's curator insight, March 11, 12:11 PM

(From the article): Humility derives from an inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work.

Humility is an essential quality for authentic leaders. People trust them because they know they are genuine, honest, and sincere. Lacking those qualities, people live in fear and doubt – not exactly the ingredients to bring out the best in people. In difficult times, people rely on humble leaders even more to get them through crises.

Johan Meiring Van Zyl's curator insight, April 4, 8:47 AM

A plea for more humble leaders, seconded here!

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Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company

Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

 This article will attempt to identify some reasons why millennials (at least ones like me) want to stay at an organization, and what makes us jump around the industry, or even cross-over into a new one.

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 5:22 AM
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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9 Ways to Make Sure You Have Effective Meetings

9 Ways to Make Sure You Have Effective Meetings | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

We’ve all been there – meetings that have gone on for too long, but nothing has been accomplished. When done right, meetings can make work easier, but more often than not they fill up your schedule and just waste everyone’s time.

Here are 9 simple tips to regain control of your calendar and improve your meeting effectiveness.


Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

Approximately $38 billion is lost every year in the US due to unproductive meetings. They’re an important part of the workplace, but what if there was a way to make sure you stayed on track and discussed what you needed to using the time you allotted.

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Mary Martínez's curator insight, February 25, 5:35 PM

Approximately $38 billion is lost every year in the US due to unproductive meetings. They’re an important part of the workplace, but what if there was a way to make sure you stayed on track and discussed what you needed to using the time you allotted.

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Ask Profound Questions…Get Profound Answers

Ask Profound Questions…Get Profound Answers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The way to get your focus clearer is by asking profound questions. This article is about teaching you what profound questions to ask to turn the fog in your head into crystal-clear energizing, unlocking, releasing, and expanding in your ability to focus. 

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Secondly, make a hobby of collecting questions for a lifetime. I would encourage you to start today making your collection of questions. Ask your best friends, ask the leaders you know in your life, “What are your all-­­time favorite questions? What questions do you ask before making a major decision? What questions would you ask before you risk money? What questions would you ask at this point in my career? What questions would you ask before you decide to sell something or buy something or adopt a child or build a house?”

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The Art of Being Insightful without Being Creepy

The Art of Being Insightful without Being Creepy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
To gain the attention of empowered buyers, sales pros are doing more research than ever before. The goal is to present insights that get potential buyers to take notice, but sometimes these efforts get attention for all the wrong reasons. Social media has its own special etiquette, and you will be far more successful if you follow the unwritten rules.

Via Anita Windisman
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): You wouldn’t ask someone you just met to help you move, no matter how good your first conversation is going. A big ask like that requires time spent building trust and rapport. Yet some sales reps can be fooled by the casual nature of social media into asking for a next step the relationship can’t yet support.


As the person making the initial contact, it’s your responsibility to add value first. It’s best to start with liking the prospects’ shares, then move on to leaving insightful comments on their posts. After that, you can ask them to connect on LinkedIn and send a personalized introductory message with a small ask (like reading an article or taking a 15-minute phone call). These incremental steps will help you build to a bigger request, without seeming like you are imposing.

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