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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Fighting Back or Playing Nice: How Employees React to Bullying Bosses

Fighting Back or Playing Nice: How Employees React to Bullying Bosses | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

It’s no secret that supervisor aggression is a serious issue facing many organizations with a wide range of consequences from retaliation and turnover to lawsuits. However, little attention has been given to the reasons why employees react differently to perceptions of supervisor aggression.

 

While it is unlikely that all instances of supervisor aggression will completely stop within any given organization, it is possible to help shape how employees will react to those situations. Most research focuses on the deconstructive reactions (e.g., getting even with their boss or taking it out on a co-worker) with less emphasis on the constructive reactions (e.g. finding an effective solution to the problem).

 

So, what factors come into play that causes an employee to have a constructive or deconstructive reaction to their boss’ aggressive behaviors....


Via Charney Coaching & Consulting, AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
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Incivility in Leadership

Incivility in Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Shortly after the investigation, all who were involved in testifying were eventually terminated from the organization. Reasons included lack of productivity, spreading malicious rumors, and just not showing enthusiasm. The leader accused of the affair was not reprimanded and an apology was given to the leader with a promotion.


Via AlGonzalezinfo
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The Practice of Empathy

The Practice of Empathy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

A client of mine is totally fed up with his boss. He has recently undergone quite a difficult, uncomfortable operation – the second in a series. Since then, there have been several interactions with his boss. Not once has he been asked how he is; worse, the task heat is full-on with a series of late night conference calls, led by the boss who always requires my client’s attendance. Amazed by the complete lack of empathy shown by his boss, my client is fast losing trust in him.

 

Empathy is right at the core of trusted relationships. If someone is genuinely on our side, interested in what we are thinking and feeling, and intent on helping us out – then we feel safer with them, readier to talk about what is uncomfortable and challenging for us, and more prepared to give them our trust.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Can You Balance More Than One Business?

Can You Balance More Than One Business? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
One business can be all-consuming, but for some restless entrepreneurs, it's not enough. Here's how to know if you can handle the juggle

 

 

Most small-business owners will tell you that they need to be efficient multi-taskers in order for their business to run smoothly. But, some business owners have to be more than efficient at handling multiple responsibilities, especially when they own more than one business.

 

Serial entrepreneurs are a special breed. They have the ability to focus on a variety of tasks that sometimes vary like night and day. They seemingly balance apples and oranges with grace, making it appear easy. But, interestingly enough, most would not recommend the average business owner juggle multiple businesses.

 

“I would only recommend this course to entrepreneurs who are extremely focused, self-motivated, self-disciplined and easily bored,” says Aimee Elizabeth, author of Poverty Sucks! How to Become a Self-Made Millionaire.

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What biz leaders can learn from jazz - Fortune Management

What biz leaders can learn from jazz - Fortune Management | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Unlike business school, jazz shows us that following others is, in its own way, a higher form of leadership. Here's why companies should take note.

 

"Lead, follow, or get out of the way" -- that old adage pretty much sums up conventional wisdom about the corporate pyramid. At the top are the chief executives who give us direction. Next come the followers, who fall in line behind (unless they want to be part of the problem). At the base is everyone else -- the ones who muddle around and obstruct the way. Little wonder that boards, investors, and other stakeholders become so fixated on identifying CEOs who can fill the role of fearless leader, however huge the raid he or she might entail on the corporate coffers.

 

Once, most CEOs rose through the ranks to take control of a company they knew intimately. Now, CEOs are just as likely to be chosen from outside, rather than promoted from within. 

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5 Ways to Go From a Manager to a Leader

5 Ways to Go From a Manager to a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Taking an upward step on a career pathway is the ultimate goal within any job.

 

Taking an upward step on a career pathway is the ultimate goal within any job. Sometimes being able to elevate yourself above your current position requires redefining your role in order to show that you can fulfil the requirements of the next link in the chain.

 

These are some key adjustments that you may need to make to show that you have what it takes to lead.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, David Hain, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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Rethinking your plan for your leadership career

Rethinking your plan for your leadership career | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

This revelation led me to staying open to what would fulfill my need to work collaboratively and be able to help more people in my work life. I’ve had a long, rich (and unusual) career in a number of disciplines unrelated to biology, without ever mapping out my career path in detail. Knowing that I was a “people person” seemed to be one of the keys that helped me to thrive.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
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Comfortable with Chaos 15

Comfortable with Chaos 15 | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Your career (and your business) is not a 6 lane highway where you can keep speeding in a single direction.

 

It is a curvy road that throws up a lot of unexpected situations. Economic downturns, changes in demand/supply and such uncertainties.

 

You cannot control any of these situations, but how you respond to them is totally in your control.

 

One thing is clear: We need to get comfortable with chaos.

 

Comfortable doesn’t mean that you let chaos happen around you and choose not to respond.

 

Being comfortable with chaos means being more responsive to chaos and creative in spotting opportunities around.

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Seven Leadership Lessons to Learn Before the Election

Seven Leadership Lessons to Learn Before the Election | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
With the Presidential election less than two months away, there are valuable leadership lessons we can all learn from the process as we watch from afar.

 

The Conventions are over.

 

The election of a new President is less than two months away.

 

This post isn’t about politics or who you should vote for.  This post is for you as a leader.

 

For while you will likely never have your every move reported on TV, never have your tax returns a matter of public record, and never seek an office like the Presidency, there are lessons we can all learn from the process as we watch from afar.

 

So whether you lean left or right, whether you consider yourself a political junkie or nearly apathetic, I want to give you reasons to watch the candidates, the rhetoric and the commentary over the next two months.

 

Watch and learn.

 

Here are seven lessons I am sure you will learn if you watch....

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10 Things I Wish I Knew 10 Years Ago

10 Things I Wish I Knew 10 Years Ago | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Stay in tune with your spirit. Be calm and think. Listen to your inner voice. Anticipate and plan. Take 100% responsibility for your life. Lean into your struggles. Act with courage. Maintain an open mind. Practice kindness and compassion. Keep your promises. Forgive, let go, and move forward. This is how you get from where you are to where you want to be.

 

I’ve learned these concepts gradually over the last decade. Together they have helped me live a life of purpose. Had I understood these things 10 years ago, I could have avoided quite a bit of confusion and grief. So today I figured I’d share a few more things I wish I had known sooner. My hope is that they help you hurdle over some of the barriers I stumbled into on the road of life.


Via The e.MILE Community
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On the Horizon

On the Horizon | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

It is sometimes a challenge for me to remember the horizon.

 

I tend to become focused on what is in front of me. My attention gets absorbed in the immediate decision we are trying to make, the specific question we are trying to answer, the person facing me who wants my help. When I walk, I tend to look where I am taking my next step.

 

I need to remind myself how important it is to look for what is on the horizon.

 

The horizon is the line where the earth meets the sky. It is the boundary between what we can see and what is just outside our sight. There is a horizon in any direction we look; it surrounds us, and we do not know what is waiting just past the horizon.

 

It is helpful for me to take time regularly to stop, take a breath, and look at the horizon. The horizon reminds me that there are things I cannot see, though they may not be very far away.

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A Good Way to Change a Corporate Culture

A Good Way to Change a Corporate Culture | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

All business owners know that it is much easier to talk about changing the culture of a business, than it is to effectively bring about any meaningful change, in a well established culture.

 

Anyone who has succeeded in effecting a change in the culture that previously prevailed in their business, will tell you it took a lot longer than expected, and the disruption to the business was greater than expected.

 

This excellent article, acknowledges the difficulties of effecting lasting change in the culture of any business, and it suggests an easier way that can be adopted to effect immediate change that can be built on as the initial change suggested takes effect.


Via Richard Andrews, Daniel Watson, David Hain
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Trust and Leaders

Trust and Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How do you motivate employees? Here are three things you can do as a leader to help.

 

Okay, to a point money does motivate, of course. And the more money you throw at me the more motivated I will become, especially these days... for a little while anyway.

 

But that will soon fade as it becomes an expectation more than a reward. At some point more money isn't going to matter as much. It is going to take something else.

 

Study after study has shown that being happy at work is more about the little things than it is about large bonuses, stock options and exceptional benefits.

 

I'm not saying those things don't help, but feeling valued, respected and trusted at work is even more important.


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, AlGonzalezinfo
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Leadership: Thinking from the bottom upwards

Leadership: Thinking from the bottom upwards | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Leadership: According to professor Graham Jones, too many senior leaders adopt a top-down approach to their roles.

 

Organisational structures are almost always drawn with leaders at the top, and leaders are expected to inspire followership among 'the people below. Too often, I come across that dreadful word 'subordinates' in organisations, which further perpetuates the unchallenged notion of leaders being on top directing their minions who cater to their every whim. And when leaders talk about 'cascading' their vision within the organisation, there is only one direction anything will ever cascade!

 

So the language, ethos, and culture in the vast majority of organisations perpetuates and exacerbates what has become an unchallenged protocol that leaders should adopt a top-down approach to leadership. But what if leaders turned their profession on its head and adopted a 'bottom-line' approach?


Via Kevin Watson
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10 Things You Need to Learn to Live a Super-Happy Life

10 Things You Need to Learn to Live a Super-Happy Life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Happiness comes in many forms. To bring out the best in you and help you live a super-happy life, there are 10 things that you need to learn.

 

The older we get, the more that we experience life and the more that we learn what truly makes us happy.

 

Personally, happiness has always been an intriguing point of interest for me. I have always seen happiness as the epitome of all success that life can bring. If you’re happy, then surely you’ve got everything sorted, right? What more could you want?

 

Happiness comes in many forms. The good thing is it can be extremely different from person to person. Why is this a good thing? You can tailor everything you do in your life to bring out the happiness in you. There are however, a number of key themes that span across all individuals for finding happiness.

 

To bring out the best in you and help you live a super-happy life, there are 10 things that you need to learn.

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Mentoring Matters

Mentoring Matters | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
After nearly 20 years of working with people, building teams, and leading people, I have learned that there are many Biblical truths which can be applied daily.

 

After nearly 20 years of working with people, building teams, and leading people, I have learned that there are many Biblical truths which can be applied daily. For instance, Romans 1:18 clearly explains why unrighteous people refuse to see the truths about themselves and their sinful condition. In the ESV version of the Bible, Romans 1:18 reads, “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth.”  Paul wrote this epistle to explain why the people who see the truth of God all around them – systems designed beyond the capabilities of today’s best engineers, anthropic principles that if off even the slightest of amounts would not have supported mankind, and proofs (cosmological, teleological, and natural theology) that point towards a Creator – suppress and reject it. Interestingly, Paul, in apparent anticipation of today faithless age, captured nearly 2,000 years ago the reason why people chronically suppress truth.


Certainly Paul’s statement was intended to reflect the suppression of the truth of God, but it has secondary applications as well. For example, even today’s secular leadership manuals teach the importance of “confronting reality,” the same principle Paul expounded above. Leaders have learned that people do not like dealing with uncomfortable truths of any size. Whether that truth is a major – the existence of God – or as small – miscommunication with a co-worker – people quickly suppress the truth, allowing themselves to be held blameless while the other parties is held responsible for any issues. Consequently, most people never fulfill their leadership potential because they are too busy suppressing truth to learn from it.

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Entrepreneurial leadership -- even if you're not an entrepreneur

Entrepreneurial leadership -- even if you're not an entrepreneur | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
I've noticed a consistent quality of entrepreneurial leadership: It is the genuine feeling, infused into your business persona, of ownership.

 

The U.S. has a love affair with entrepreneurship, and it’s no big surprise. Our founding mythology is built on the stories of loners, tribes and rebels. Entrepreneurship is the ultimate definition of modern freedom — accountability only to yourself. No more “workin’ for the man” (or wo-man). Entrepreneurs who have attained such freedom are powerful, and they don’t take guff from “the system.”

 

Those who’ve braved the entrepreneurial seas know it’s not always smooth sailing, of course. Cash flow has a way of sitting heavy on your freedom when it’s not flowing, and being a company of one can be pretty lonely sometimes. If you’re workin’ for the wo-man, I recommend you talk to some seasoned entrepreneurs before you jump ship from the cruise liner to the dingy.

 

Make sure the course you’re about to set is the right one for you, your family and your lifestyle.

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The Anatomy Of A CEO @ Pinfographics

The Anatomy Of A CEO @ Pinfographics | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The Anatomy Of A CEO Infographic is one of the best Infographics created in the category. Check out The Anatomy Of A CEO now!

Via sylviaunlimited, John van den Brink
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How Bad Leadership Spurs Entrepreneurship

How Bad Leadership Spurs Entrepreneurship | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The bright side of incompetent management.

 

What do 70% of successful entrepreneurs have in common? They all incubated their business ideas while employed by someone else. Indeed, most people start their own companies — or go freelance — in order to stop working for others. Why? Because most managers are simply unbearable. Year after year, Gallup reports that most employees are unhappy at work, and that the number one reason for dissatisfaction is their boss.

 

But there is one upside to incompetent management: by failing to attend to their employees' ideas, and continuing to demoralize their staff, bad leaders accidentally stimulate entrepreneurship.

 

Indeed, if entrepreneurial employees (i.e., those who have the talent and drive to be inventive and enterprising) were happy at work, or at least felt that their ideas are being valued, they would contribute to innovation and growth in their employers' organization, rather than setting up their own company.

 

Therefore, bad leadership — or, if you prefer, incompetent management — is a major source of entrepreneurship. In fact, America owes much of its recent growth, technological innovation, and socioeconomic progress, to inept managers.


Via Kevin Watson
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All Things Workplace: Leadership: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person

All Things Workplace: Leadership: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
I was standing at the meat counter at the local market and watched a leadership principle unfold before me: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person.

 

Tentative efforts lead to tentative outcomes. Therefore, give yourself fully to your endeavors. Decide to construct your character through excellent actions and determine to pay the price of a worthy goal. The trials you encounter will introduce you to your strengths. Remain steadfast...and one day you will build something that endures, something worthy of your potential— Epictetus


I was standing at the meat counter at the local market and watched a leadership principle unfold before me: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person.


Normally, they have little slips of paper with numbers that make the process run smoothly: take your number and wait for it to be called. But they ran out of numbers. Which meant we had to figure out for ourselves who was next.


The nice part: people were concerned about not "butting" ahead.


The bad part: as a result, when the butcher yelled, "Next", there was a lot of shuffling, faux self-deprecation, and confusion. No meat was moving out of the display case.


Finally, someone said strongly, "I believe I am next" and, at the same time. stepped forward right in front of the butcher. Following her move, there was a similar response at the ensuing, "Next!"


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Survey Says: Workplace Culture Matters to Employees

Survey Says: Workplace Culture Matters to Employees | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
But Deloitte reports a disparity between how leaders and employees view their workplace culture.

 

Since I'm an evangelist for the link between good company culture and strong business results, I'm always happy when I see data that helps validate the connection.

 

A recent 2012 report from Deloitte, "Culture in the Workplace," reveals some encouraging findings about workplace culture:

 

94% of executives and 88% of employees believe a distinct workplace culture is important to business success


83% of executives and 84% of employees rank having engaged and motivated employees as the top factor that substantially contributes to a company's success


There is a correlation between employees who say their organization has a clearly articulated and lived culture and those that say they are "happy at work" and feel "valued by [their] company"


While this is heartening news, I was struck by a disconnect between executives and employees about how that workplace culture is expressed and executed:

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Setting Organizational Attitude and Tone

Setting Organizational Attitude and Tone | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Positive environments are built on positive attitudes, speech, and behaviors.

 

Circumstances don’t determine the atmosphere and tone of organizations, leaders do.

Look around your office or leadership team. Is the tone positive or negative? Now, look at yourself. How are you perceived?

 

Organizations reflect leadership.

 

Thursday, I reconnected with Shirzad Chamine, author of, Positive Intelligence. He reminded me that our “Sage” is a joyful, curious, explorer. I started thinking about fearful versus confident leadership.

 

Fearful vs. Confident:

 

Fearful leaders withdraw, limit, control, manipulate, and pressure others. Fearful leaders respond to challenges, opportunities, and problems pessimistically.


Via Sparktheaction
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Get Your Brain Some Exercise Today

Get Your Brain Some Exercise Today | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
This exercise can help students or even professionals create skills of taking a look at things via various perspectives.

 

Whenever was the final time a person explored your own creative part and offered a vent for the imaginative energy? In this fast-paced living, creativity often requires a backseat. Work issues after which personal issues often overshadow our capacity of creative considering. Companies frequently hold issue solving classes, brain physical exercise or thinking sessions in order to simplify issues with regards with the organization. Sitting in a round desk conference does not always mean you’re with innovative solutions. Routine considering leaves an individual drained which hampers innovative thinking abilities. Here, we shall check out some innovative thinking actions and exercises to build up better coordination at the job and solve personal problems. These exercises may be used for effective results actually in colleges.

 

Activities as well as Exercises with regard to Creative Considering


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Sleep Or Die: How Little Or No Sleep Will Affect You [Infographic]

Sleep Or Die: How Little Or No Sleep Will Affect You [Infographic] | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Dedicated entrepreneurs sometimes keep working towards their goals even though their bodies tell them to quit and go to bed.

 

Dedicated entrepreneurs sometimes keep workingtowards their goals even though their bodies tell them to quit and go to bed. It is called nothing other than dedication, and it is a tool that most entrepreneurs use quite often to get ahead of the game. Only our bodies know what cost of this is. It’s a great tool to use, but the negative effects of it might be more costly than the gain of the actual work completed. It is said that you can neverget back the sleep you’ve lost. That basically means that even though you decide to sleep a couple of hours longer after a long 24 hour shift, you will still not have made up for the lost sleep that you were supposed to get hours ago. It’s just how the body works.

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7 Sure-Fire Ways Great Leaders Inspire People To Follow Them

7 Sure-Fire Ways Great Leaders Inspire People To Follow Them | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
On the 25th anniversary of the iconic business book The Leadership Challenge Carmine speaks to the authors and revisits the vision principle.

 

Twenty-five years ago Santa Clara University Professors Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner wrote The Leadership Challenge, a primer on how to make extraordinary things happen in organizations by helping leaders perform their personal best. Two million copies have been sold and an updated version of the book has just been released. Since the book helped to frame my own ideas on leadership, it was a pleasure to sit down recently with both Kouzes and Posner to talk about a topic I consider the most relevant to this column: how leaders can communicate a vision that gets people excited about going to work each day.

 

In 1987 when the book was first published, 62 percent of employees said that they admired leaders who were “forward looking.” In 2012, 71 percent of those surveyed said the same. In 1987, 58 percent of employees wanted to work for leaders who were “inspiring.” Today nearly 70 percent want to be inspired.


Via Richard Andrews, Roger Francis
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