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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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The Power of Quiet

The Power of Quiet | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

As a student, I often felt the need for a quiet pause in classes; the quiet pause to reflect and consider what the teacher had been saying, to doodle my thoughts, making connections in my mind. As a teacher, I have always believed that lessons don't have to be all bells and whistles and chandelier swinging. For every teaching context, there are moments when quiet is a welcoming break in the classroom.

 

This also makes me consider quiet students. One of my best students this semester happens to also be the quietest. Yet this student is always ready to help peers, may seem absent minded but is following the lesson and activities, participating in her silent way.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, January 28, 2013 3:53 AM
Thank you ratzeister! Silence is often looked at negatively and it shouldn't be so; quiet in learning is necessary as well.
Sarah Henchey's comment, January 28, 2013 7:29 AM
Appreciate the recognition of "quietude": "Quiet classrooms provide learners with an inner space for making connections."
Wendi Pillars's curator insight, January 28, 2013 9:09 PM

Need to make more space for quiet. Personal opinion. :)

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Right or Wrong Isn’t the Issue

Right or Wrong Isn’t the Issue | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Treating non-moral decisions like moral – right or wrong – choices, establishes adversarial relationships. Church people do this when they fight over methods, programs, or the color of the church’s front door.

 

 

Treating options like moral decisions makes you look like an out-of-balance fool. Chill out!


Via Richard Andrews
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The Surprising Secret to Selling Yourself

The Surprising Secret to Selling Yourself | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Focus on your potential, not your track record.

 

There is no shortage of advice out there on how to make a good impression — an impression good enough to land you a new job, score a promotion, or bring in that lucrative sales lead. Practice your pitch. Speak confidently, but not too quickly. Make eye contact. And for the love of Pete, don't be modest — highlight your accomplishments. After all, a person's track record of success (or a company's, for that matter) is the single most important factor in determining whether or not they get hired. Or is it?

 

As it happens, it isn't. Because when we are deciding who to hire, promote, or do business with, it turns out that we don't like the Big Thing nearly as much as we like the Next Big Thing. We have a bias — one that operates below our conscious awareness — leading us to prefer the potential for greatness over someone who has already achieved it.


Via Anne Egros
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How to Build Self-Discipline – The 6 Key Elements

How to Build Self-Discipline – The 6 Key Elements | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Do you often find yourself procrastinating?

 

Perhaps doing things that you know you shouldn’t be doing?

Do you find it hard to stay focused and perform at your peak?

 

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may need to build self-discipline.

 

Self-discipline is the ability to do what you think you should be doing rather than doing something based on how you feel.


Via Gary Walter, Virginia Pavlovich
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How to Lead a More Balanced Life

How to Lead a More Balanced Life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Where is your focus: past, present, or future? In this guest post by Todd Stocker, he suggests a strategy for maintaining balance.

 

Many of you are constantly looking over your shoulder at your past and not keeping your eye on the present and future. Past fears, failures and even success keeps your life off balance and off focus. As a result, moving forward is difficult if even possible.

 

So how should we keep our balance between our past, present and future? Try this: “Glance at the past. Work in the present. Focus on the future.”

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9 things successful people do differently

9 things successful people do differently | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. The intuitive answer — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others — is really just one small piece of the puzzle.

 

In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of what they do.


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Productivity the Richard Branson way

Productivity the Richard Branson way | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Six secrets to the Virgin Group Founder's success..

 

If there’s one thing that Richard Branson clearly has in abundance, it’s get up and go. You need only look at his travel schedule for this week (Haiti, Warsaw, Cairo, Mumbai and Delhi – honest!) to realise that productivity has played a large part in his and Virgin’s success over the years.

 

With this in mind Rob Rawson from Biz 3.0 has managed to crack his secrets to productivity into six key areas. It certainly makes for some interesting reading, have a look and see if there’s something which you can pick up:

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The Best Advice I’ve Learned Running My Business…

The Best Advice I’ve Learned Running My Business… | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Running a business, especially in the early days of getting it up and running, can be a tough and lonely endeavour.

 

It is in the nature of many new entrepreneurs, to only listen to their own voice, and to initially not take advantage of the advice of others who have gone before them.

 

This good article, provides tips from 59 small business owners and entrepreneurs, and any entrepreneur should find several that will be very useful to them as they progress on their own journey.


Via Daniel Watson, Ivo Nový, John van den Brink
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In pursuit of the balanced life: 5 simple tips for teleworkers

In pursuit of the balanced life: 5 simple tips for teleworkers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The distinction between professional and personal for teleworkers is tenuous at best. Here are 5 lessons I’ve learned as a telecommuter.

 

The distinction between professional and personal lives for teleworkers is tenuous at best. To achieve optimal levels of productivity, creativity and happiness in both realms of work and leisure, we must develop boundaries. Here are five lessons I’ve learned  as a telecommuter:


1. Empower yourself to power down. When your workplace is also your home, it’s all too easy to forget where one ends and the other begins. If you leave your computer open, you’ll remain a slave to it; eventually, your work will be less creative and less rewarding. “Just one more minute” almost always turns into 30. Choose a specified time each day to power down your computer, put your smartphone on vibrate, and just relax.


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5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity

5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

More emotional intelligence, is what our world strongly need. This excellent post say all what you need to know about this subject. [note Martin Gysler]

 

Employees today are much more aware of whether or not they are a good fit in their workplace culture and they want their leaders to be more mindful of their needs. In general, employees have become more sensitive about how to best co-exist in a workplace environment that allows them to be who they naturally are.

 

Employees are tired of playing games and just want to be themselves. As such, they are managing their careers and looking to advance by searching for jobs that truly fuel their passion, fulfill their desires, and ignite their real talent. For most, today’s economic landscape has made the career management journey extra challenging. And beyond career advancement opportunities, people want their supervisors and leaders to be more in touch with who they are as people (not just as their colleagues) to assure that their career track is in proper alignment with and supports their personal and professional goals.

 

Read more: http://onforb.es/S5CSgI


Via Martin Gysler
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How not to Coach!

How not to Coach! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Once they realise that you do not need to be an expert to coach, or to have an answer for people, their inhibitions seem to evaporate.

 

If I asked you to name the one activity that Managers tend to neglect most, what would it be? I suppose I must have trained thousands of Managers over the years, in organisations large and small, public and private, all around the world. My experience is that very few of them see one particular activity as being part of their role. Are you and I talking about the same thing here, I wonder? The activity is, dah dah…………………..

 

COACHING


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Saying no to the boss: Why it's essential

Saying no to the boss: Why it's essential | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Sometimes, it’s impossible to push against powerful people. But employees often have resources to empower themselves that they may not recognize.

 

We all know the feeling: the boss has given us an unpleasant task we may not even agree with but ultimately have to perform. Many times, these orders are essential to making a company run. But not always. And sometimes they seem plain wrong.

 

In those cases, companies ultimately benefit when a subordinate speaks up, according to James Detert, a management professor at Cornell's Johnson school. But right when their input is needed most, many employees lose their voice. "In the vast majority of cases where companies end up with whistleblowing-level disasters, almost always we can trace them back to an early conversation where somebody tried to communicate directly up the chain and couldn't or were so afraid to do so that they let it pile up," he says.

 

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What to Do When You Have to Work with Someone You Don't Like

What to Do When You Have to Work with Someone You Don't Like | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Use this psychological trick when a colleague makes your skin crawl.

 

Jeff*, like me, is a writer, a speaker, and the head of a consulting company. As far as I can tell, he's professional, well respected, capable, honest, and has a popular following. Someone we both know has asked us to collaborate on a project and there's clearly a mutual benefit to our working together.

 

It all sounds great except for one thing: I don't like Jeff.

 

Something about him rubs me the wrong way. He seems too self-serving or egocentric or self-satisfied. I don't know what it is exactly, but I know I don't like him.

 

I mentioned that to the person who wants us to work together. She told me, essentially, to get over it. "You don't have to like him," she said, "but you'd be smart to work with him."

 

So how do you work with someone you don't like?

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Are You an Agile Leader?

Are You an Agile Leader? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It’s the ability to lead well through a wide range of circumstances - especially when leading change.

 

It’s the ability to lead well through a wide range of circumstances - especially when leading change. You can spot an agile leader because they are flexible, balanced, quick, graceful, and able to work effectively with uncertainty and ambiguity.

 

Here are some of my favorite definitions of agility with respect to leadership:

 

Capacity to be flexible and resourceful in the face of ever-changing conditions


The ability to move with an easy grace

 

The ability to weave together and make sense of apparently disjointed pieces, crafting innovative solutions

 

Ability to change position rapidly and accurately without losing balance

 

One thing we know for sure… business change is here to stay. If businesses want to succeed at managing at the pace of change “change management” may have much more to do with improving how we lead than about managing the change. And that’s where the skill of agility comes in.


Via David Hain
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You're Wired to Be a Leader

You're Wired to Be a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You were born with seven brain attributes for effective management. How much you turn the volume up or down depends on you--and what you want to accomplish.

 

Research tells us that there are seven brain attributes—thinking and behavioral tendencies—every leader naturally takes advantage of to a greater or lesser extent, and finds they’re effective to a greater or lesser extent depending on the traits of the individuals they interact with. These neural pathways are etched in the brain over many years:

 

1. Analytical thinking happens in the left hemisphere of the brain and is essential to making more objective, less biased decisions. As a leader, this is the function that helps you look at existing research and data, examine options, and question what will or will not work.

 

2. Structural thinking also takes place in the left part of the brain and ensures that you come up with a plan that is doable. It is the methodical, sequential process that helps maximize results, and minimize pitfalls.

 

3. Social thinking is a right-brain tendency that allows a leader to listen, build successful teams, relate to people, and develop and inspire others.

 

4. Conceptual thinking is right-brain, visionary thinking that jumpstarts innovation. Ideas that connect the dots and come out of left field can invigorate your organization.

 

5. Expressiveness is a behavior style you use to communicate your ideas. It affects how you relate to people and sets the course for the way you speak with others.

 

6. Assertiveness is a behavior style you use to put your ideas to work. An effective leader is assertive enough to make things happen, but not so assertive that others are stymied.

 

7. Flexibility is a behavior style you bring to the way you get things done. It determines not only your openness to other points of view, but also your ability to thrive in undefined (or very defined) situations.

 

Full article: http://www.inc.com/geil-browning/your-brain-is-wired-for-leadership.html


Via Andrea Jacob, David Hain, Chris Chan
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Understanding Complexity And What To Do About It

Understanding Complexity And What To Do About It | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

"The problem is that simplicity is not so simple. We live in a complex universe where much that happens is beyond our control. Merely wishing things to be simpler does not make it so. In fact, making facile assumptions often leads to disaster.

 

How we deal with complexity determines how we innovate, build organizations that can compete effectively and navigate an increasingly technological marketplace. We need to take it seriously, not gloss over it. Fortunately, this has been an area of intense study since the beginning of the digital age and there are some basic principles that can guide us."


Via Cyrille Jansem, David Hain
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Leadership Lessons in Humility, Gratitude and More From Kathy Ireland

Leadership Lessons in Humility, Gratitude and More From Kathy Ireland | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
While she is beautiful, the lasting memories I have of her are wisdom and inner beauty.

 

 

 

Most know Kathy as a supermodel and actress.  Fewer realize she is the active CEO of Kathy Ireland Worldwide, a $1.5 Billion enterprise doing business, well, worldwide.

 

While she is beautiful, the lasting memories I have of her are wisdom and inner beauty.   I hope this post gives you a glimpse of what I mean.

 

Admittedly, I listen to a speaker with impressive achievements through my leadership filter, and it wasn’t hard to find leadership lessons her her talk.  Here is a partial list of the lessons I took from this true leader and some challenging questions for you.

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Playing the Part of Leader

Playing the Part of Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Nice take on the need for and power of authenticity.

 

“Don’t just act like the character. Be the character.” I’ve heard these words from theater directors many times, and so have countless other actors and actresses on stage and screen. The best actors are the ones who cause you to forget that you’re watching a movie or attending a live play, who can convince you that what you’re observing is real. They are the ones who believe in and lose themselves in their characters, truly feel what they are portraying, and bring their authentic selves to their roles.

 

Such is the case with the best leaders.


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Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why do some leaders make little difference to organizations and countries while others turn out to be indispensable?

 

Consider the 44 men who have been president. How many would you say have left an indelible mark?

 

Historians may know what James Buchanan and Andrew Johnson did, but most Americans only remember the guy who came between them: Abraham Lincoln.

 

So how did Lincoln become Lincoln and Andrew Johnson become, well, Andrew Johnson? At the Harvard Business School, organizational psychology professor Gautam Mukunda says it comes down to a handful of key decisions.


Via Seth Capo, Bill Butler
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Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand?

Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

There are three basic levels of trust. The first level is deterence-based trust, or what I like to call “rules-based” trust. This is the most fundamental, base level of trust in all relationships. Deterence-based trust means that there are rules in place that prevent one person from taking advantage of, or harming another person. In society we have laws that govern our behavior in personal and business settings. When we engage in business we have contracts that ensure one party can trust another to hold up their end of the bargain. In organizations we have policies and procedures that provide boundaries for how we interact and treat each other, and if we violate those rules, usually there are consequences involved.


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13 Questions To Ask Yourself At The End Of Your Career

13 Questions To Ask Yourself At The End Of Your Career | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Number 7) Did I grasp the difference between management and leadership as soon as I should have?

 

Having just retired (or semi-retired… retired at least from the corporate world), you tend to think about things. 

 

This is always a dangerous undertaking.  Nonetheless, following are 13 career-related questions that have been flitting through my mind lately.   Perhaps they can be of some value, or at least interest, to those not as far along the career path as I am.

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What Makes A Great Boss? A Surprising New Study.

What Makes A Great Boss? A Surprising New Study. | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
What’s the value of a good boss? When the boss is a CEO, that question has been closely scrutinized. But the role of less exalted front-line supervisors—the folks who directly oversee teams of workers—has been overlooked.

 

What’s the value of a good boss? When the boss is a CEO, that question has been closely scrutinized. But the role of less exalted front-line supervisors—the folks who directly oversee teams of workers—has been overlooked. Do supervisors vary in quality? How valuable is a good one? And what makes a good one good? These are questions that preoccupy people in their daily work lives, but haven’t been the subject of much formal research.


That’s why it’s excellent that Kathryn Shaw and Edward Lazear of Stanford’s Graduate School of Business recently teamed up with the University of Utah’s Christopher Stanton to explore the subject in a working paper called “The Value of Bosses.”


Via Gary Walter, David Hain
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With Professional Emails, It's the Little Things That Count

With Professional Emails, It's the Little Things That Count | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Some of these overlooked, underutilized details could help you get ahead.

 

Could your emails be hurting your job hunt or career? It's the small details in written communication that might be undermining your message.

 

One popular UCLA study found that 93 percent of a message is interpreted by the nonverbal components, in other words, your tone and body language. So what does this mean in your written communication? How is the reader interpreting your message as they view it?

 

During a job search and in your career, creating the correct professional impression is within your control. Think about how some of these overlooked details could help you get ahead.

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Importance of Employee Appreciation Infographic - Spark Hire

Importance of Employee Appreciation Infographic - Spark Hire | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Take a look at the infographic to see how significant employee appreciation really is to a company.

Via Richard Andrews
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