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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Playing the Part of Leader

Playing the Part of Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Nice take on the need for and power of authenticity.

 

“Don’t just act like the character. Be the character.” I’ve heard these words from theater directors many times, and so have countless other actors and actresses on stage and screen. The best actors are the ones who cause you to forget that you’re watching a movie or attending a live play, who can convince you that what you’re observing is real. They are the ones who believe in and lose themselves in their characters, truly feel what they are portraying, and bring their authentic selves to their roles.

 

Such is the case with the best leaders.


Via David Hain
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Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why do some leaders make little difference to organizations and countries while others turn out to be indispensable?

 

Consider the 44 men who have been president. How many would you say have left an indelible mark?

 

Historians may know what James Buchanan and Andrew Johnson did, but most Americans only remember the guy who came between them: Abraham Lincoln.

 

So how did Lincoln become Lincoln and Andrew Johnson become, well, Andrew Johnson? At the Harvard Business School, organizational psychology professor Gautam Mukunda says it comes down to a handful of key decisions.


Via Seth Capo, Bill Butler
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Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand?

Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

There are three basic levels of trust. The first level is deterence-based trust, or what I like to call “rules-based” trust. This is the most fundamental, base level of trust in all relationships. Deterence-based trust means that there are rules in place that prevent one person from taking advantage of, or harming another person. In society we have laws that govern our behavior in personal and business settings. When we engage in business we have contracts that ensure one party can trust another to hold up their end of the bargain. In organizations we have policies and procedures that provide boundaries for how we interact and treat each other, and if we violate those rules, usually there are consequences involved.


Via The People Development Network
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13 Questions To Ask Yourself At The End Of Your Career

13 Questions To Ask Yourself At The End Of Your Career | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Number 7) Did I grasp the difference between management and leadership as soon as I should have?

 

Having just retired (or semi-retired… retired at least from the corporate world), you tend to think about things. 

 

This is always a dangerous undertaking.  Nonetheless, following are 13 career-related questions that have been flitting through my mind lately.   Perhaps they can be of some value, or at least interest, to those not as far along the career path as I am.

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What Makes A Great Boss? A Surprising New Study.

What Makes A Great Boss? A Surprising New Study. | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
What’s the value of a good boss? When the boss is a CEO, that question has been closely scrutinized. But the role of less exalted front-line supervisors—the folks who directly oversee teams of workers—has been overlooked.

 

What’s the value of a good boss? When the boss is a CEO, that question has been closely scrutinized. But the role of less exalted front-line supervisors—the folks who directly oversee teams of workers—has been overlooked. Do supervisors vary in quality? How valuable is a good one? And what makes a good one good? These are questions that preoccupy people in their daily work lives, but haven’t been the subject of much formal research.


That’s why it’s excellent that Kathryn Shaw and Edward Lazear of Stanford’s Graduate School of Business recently teamed up with the University of Utah’s Christopher Stanton to explore the subject in a working paper called “The Value of Bosses.”


Via Gary Walter, David Hain
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With Professional Emails, It's the Little Things That Count

With Professional Emails, It's the Little Things That Count | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Some of these overlooked, underutilized details could help you get ahead.

 

Could your emails be hurting your job hunt or career? It's the small details in written communication that might be undermining your message.

 

One popular UCLA study found that 93 percent of a message is interpreted by the nonverbal components, in other words, your tone and body language. So what does this mean in your written communication? How is the reader interpreting your message as they view it?

 

During a job search and in your career, creating the correct professional impression is within your control. Think about how some of these overlooked details could help you get ahead.

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Importance of Employee Appreciation Infographic - Spark Hire

Importance of Employee Appreciation Infographic - Spark Hire | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Take a look at the infographic to see how significant employee appreciation really is to a company.

Via Richard Andrews
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You Can't Be a Great Leader Without Trust. Here's How You Build It

You Can't Be a Great Leader Without Trust. Here's How You Build It | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Among all the attributes of the greatest leaders of our time, one stands above the rest: They are all highly trusted. You can have a compelling vision, rock-solid strategy, excellent communication skills, innovative insight, and a skilled team, but if people don’t trust you, you will never get the results you want. Leaders who inspire trust garner better output, morale, retention, innovation, loyalty, and revenue, while mistrust fosters skepticism, frustration, low productivity, lost sales, and turnover.

 

Trust affects a leader’s impact and the company’s bottom line more than any other single thing.


Via The People Development Network, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
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Leadership Traits Any Leader Needs

Leadership Traits Any Leader Needs | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Just ask any person in a leadership position and they would tell you that they love working and making a difference for the organization or the society. But asked about the biggest challenges in their leadership?

 

Just ask any person in a leadership position and they would tell you that they love working and making a difference for the organization or the society. But asked about the biggest challenges in their leadership? They could easily point to people! They could be people they work with. People who ask for favors from them, or people who have made it their habit to make the lives of leaders miserable!


Leaders need some leadership traits. But what are these traits? How are leadership traits different from skills?


For me, leadership skills relate to the performance of tasks, results and deliverables. When you say that a leader has good delegation skills, he knows how to maximize the talents and of his subordinates toward the fulfillment of goals. But you can’t say that he has good delegation traits. That’s not a trait. Instead, traits are related to character and relationship with people.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Robin Martin, David Hain, Kevin Watson
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No Excuses = Real Leadership | N2Growth Blog

No Excuses = Real Leadership | N2Growth Blog | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The problem we face as a society is we live in a time where he or she with the best excuses wins.

 

Leaders don’t offer, nor do they accept excuses. True leadership demands the character to demonstrate personal responsibility for one’s actions, and the courage to hold others accountable for theirs. Excuses attempt to conceal personal or professional insecurities, laziness, and/or lack of ability. They accomplish nothing but to distract, dilute, and deceive. It was Benjamin Franklin who said, “He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else.”

 

The word “excuse” is most commonly defined as: a reason or explanation put forward to defend or justify a fault or offense. History’s greatest leaders have always fostered cultures of commitment, trust, and performance, where action is valued over rhetoric. Leaders who issue or accept excuses are complicit to muting performance and fueling mediocrity.

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What I Should Have Said…

What I Should Have Said… | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

So how much of the responsibility for employee development lies with the employee?

 

I don’t recall the specific verbiage that was used, but that was the gist of the question as I remember it. It came in a Q & A session following a talk Andy Janning and I gave about employee development, during which I advocated for employee development to be thought of differently than it often is.

 

Some version of that question was probably running through the minds of others in the audience after I was fairly direct about some managers’ general apathy toward developing their employees. I had suggested that organizations stop acting like the training department alone owns employee development. On a related note I opined that organizations need to stop holding Training more accountable for employee development than those employees’ managers. I said that we, in organizations, need to stop making it OK if managers aren’t developing their employees, and stop thinking that a manager sending an employee to a training session counts as them developing them that employee. And then, to top it off, I argued that organizations need to stop promoting people into management if they don’t develop people; just being a technical expert isn’t good enough anymore.

 

I was essentially suggesting that employee development needs to evolve into something more than an effort to create human pegs to stick into organizational holes. It has to become more about creating an environment that it is about creating a program. Employee development has to be a community effort, an organizational way of life that’s owned by everyone.

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Beyond the Finish Line: Building Leadership through the After-Event Review

Beyond the Finish Line: Building Leadership through the After-Event Review | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The after-event review has emerged in recent years as a promising leadership development tool for businesses. First used by the military, the after-event review is a structured examination and analysis of an action by its participants after it has concluded.

 

But after-event reviews do not affect everyone the same way, as Assistant Professor of Management Jennifer Nahrgang has found in her research. In an elaborate experiment conducted with three other researchers over a two-year span, Nahrgang found that after-event reviews are most effective for individuals with certain personality traits or who come to the exercise with certain experiences.

 

"We found that after-event reviews did help to develop leadership skills, but among people who go through the process, some benefited much more than others," Nahrgang said.


Via Morag Barrett, David Hain
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Getting to Know You

Getting to Know You | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Who are you?

 

Here are some ideas to help you develop a better knowledge of yourself. Adopting even a few of them can help you begin to make positive changes in the way you see yourself as well as others.

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Productivity the Richard Branson way

Productivity the Richard Branson way | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Six secrets to the Virgin Group Founder's success..

 

If there’s one thing that Richard Branson clearly has in abundance, it’s get up and go. You need only look at his travel schedule for this week (Haiti, Warsaw, Cairo, Mumbai and Delhi – honest!) to realise that productivity has played a large part in his and Virgin’s success over the years.

 

With this in mind Rob Rawson from Biz 3.0 has managed to crack his secrets to productivity into six key areas. It certainly makes for some interesting reading, have a look and see if there’s something which you can pick up:

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The Best Advice I’ve Learned Running My Business…

The Best Advice I’ve Learned Running My Business… | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Running a business, especially in the early days of getting it up and running, can be a tough and lonely endeavour.

 

It is in the nature of many new entrepreneurs, to only listen to their own voice, and to initially not take advantage of the advice of others who have gone before them.

 

This good article, provides tips from 59 small business owners and entrepreneurs, and any entrepreneur should find several that will be very useful to them as they progress on their own journey.


Via Daniel Watson, Ivo Nový, John van den Brink
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In pursuit of the balanced life: 5 simple tips for teleworkers

In pursuit of the balanced life: 5 simple tips for teleworkers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The distinction between professional and personal for teleworkers is tenuous at best. Here are 5 lessons I’ve learned as a telecommuter.

 

The distinction between professional and personal lives for teleworkers is tenuous at best. To achieve optimal levels of productivity, creativity and happiness in both realms of work and leisure, we must develop boundaries. Here are five lessons I’ve learned  as a telecommuter:


1. Empower yourself to power down. When your workplace is also your home, it’s all too easy to forget where one ends and the other begins. If you leave your computer open, you’ll remain a slave to it; eventually, your work will be less creative and less rewarding. “Just one more minute” almost always turns into 30. Choose a specified time each day to power down your computer, put your smartphone on vibrate, and just relax.


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5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity

5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

More emotional intelligence, is what our world strongly need. This excellent post say all what you need to know about this subject. [note Martin Gysler]

 

Employees today are much more aware of whether or not they are a good fit in their workplace culture and they want their leaders to be more mindful of their needs. In general, employees have become more sensitive about how to best co-exist in a workplace environment that allows them to be who they naturally are.

 

Employees are tired of playing games and just want to be themselves. As such, they are managing their careers and looking to advance by searching for jobs that truly fuel their passion, fulfill their desires, and ignite their real talent. For most, today’s economic landscape has made the career management journey extra challenging. And beyond career advancement opportunities, people want their supervisors and leaders to be more in touch with who they are as people (not just as their colleagues) to assure that their career track is in proper alignment with and supports their personal and professional goals.

 

Read more: http://onforb.es/S5CSgI


Via Martin Gysler
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How not to Coach!

How not to Coach! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Once they realise that you do not need to be an expert to coach, or to have an answer for people, their inhibitions seem to evaporate.

 

If I asked you to name the one activity that Managers tend to neglect most, what would it be? I suppose I must have trained thousands of Managers over the years, in organisations large and small, public and private, all around the world. My experience is that very few of them see one particular activity as being part of their role. Are you and I talking about the same thing here, I wonder? The activity is, dah dah…………………..

 

COACHING


Via The People Development Network
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Saying no to the boss: Why it's essential

Saying no to the boss: Why it's essential | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Sometimes, it’s impossible to push against powerful people. But employees often have resources to empower themselves that they may not recognize.

 

We all know the feeling: the boss has given us an unpleasant task we may not even agree with but ultimately have to perform. Many times, these orders are essential to making a company run. But not always. And sometimes they seem plain wrong.

 

In those cases, companies ultimately benefit when a subordinate speaks up, according to James Detert, a management professor at Cornell's Johnson school. But right when their input is needed most, many employees lose their voice. "In the vast majority of cases where companies end up with whistleblowing-level disasters, almost always we can trace them back to an early conversation where somebody tried to communicate directly up the chain and couldn't or were so afraid to do so that they let it pile up," he says.

 

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What to Do When You Have to Work with Someone You Don't Like

What to Do When You Have to Work with Someone You Don't Like | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Use this psychological trick when a colleague makes your skin crawl.

 

Jeff*, like me, is a writer, a speaker, and the head of a consulting company. As far as I can tell, he's professional, well respected, capable, honest, and has a popular following. Someone we both know has asked us to collaborate on a project and there's clearly a mutual benefit to our working together.

 

It all sounds great except for one thing: I don't like Jeff.

 

Something about him rubs me the wrong way. He seems too self-serving or egocentric or self-satisfied. I don't know what it is exactly, but I know I don't like him.

 

I mentioned that to the person who wants us to work together. She told me, essentially, to get over it. "You don't have to like him," she said, "but you'd be smart to work with him."

 

So how do you work with someone you don't like?

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7 Ways to Improve Your Personal Power and Influence as a Leader… |

7 Ways to Improve Your Personal Power and Influence as a Leader… | | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
7 Ways to Improve Your Personal Power and Influence as a Leader… | http://t.co/Gzx1DK6S...

 

Many of us struggle when trying to influence others (sometimes we can’t even influence ourselves!)

 

One of the key elements of influencing is credibility.

 

You may have heard the saying: perception is reality – Other people judge you by your actions (what you do, what you say or how you act) and NOT by your intentions. Your behavior has a huge impact on your credibility.

 

You are your demonstrated behavior…

 

I’m often asked the question: How can I build my personal credibility?


Via Roy Sheneman, PhD
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20 Things Midlifers Say They've Stopped Stressing About

20 Things Midlifers Say They've Stopped Stressing About | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Post 50s stress about many things: career, marriage, legacy –- even loose skin. But midlifers are happy to report a few things they no longer feel the need to agonize over in the world of Medicare plans and reading glasses.

 

Post 50s stress about many things: career, marriage, legacy –- even loose skin. But midlifers are happy to report a few things they no longer feel the need to agonize over in the world of Medicare plans and reading glasses.

 

For example, Meg Beattie Patrick, a 50-something communications specialist in New York City, says she no longer frets about “trappings.”

 

“I don’t stress over having the latest or nicest things any longer,” she said. “Most of the aspiring to have those types of things (house, car, pool, vacations, clothes, camps, horses, entertainment budget) was just for the sake of my children, anyway … and I only achieved my goals about half the time, which makes a girl realize the family will survive and even thrive without every material thing known to mankind.

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How to Take an Office Sabbatical

How to Take an Office Sabbatical | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Please Note: While written for pastors - there are great ideas for others in the article.

 

Emotional exhaustion, physical weariness, spiritual anorexia—twelve years of task-oriented ministry had taken its toll.  I was battling pastoral burnout, and I was losing.

 

When I confessed my despair to my superintendent, he suggested a four-syllable remedy:  Sabbatical.  An extended time away from the never-ending responsibilities of the church was not a foreign concept to me.  Two of my closest colleagues had experienced meaningful renewal through twelve-week summer sabbaticals.

 

When I approached some of the key leaders of the congregation with the idea, their response was less than encouraging:  “A sabbati—what?” “For how long?” “You’d still collect a check?” “You’re kidding, right?”

 

I felt betrayed and resentful.  But after my anger dissipated, I devised an itinerary for survival.  I developed the office sabbatical.  Here’s what I learned about taking a sabbatical in the midst of work:  Twelve keys for hiking though the wilderness of despair:

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The Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Leadership Style

The Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Leadership Style | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Look for your own style in these four types.

 

There are many leadership styles and a cottage industry has cropped up around defining them. Gayle Lantz, president of WorkMatters, Inc., a human resources consulting firm in Birmingham, Ala., uses the popular DISC assessment tool to as part of her practice to identify leadership styles.

DISC, an acronym for dominance, influencing, steadiness, and compliance, uses a series of questions each with four answers. Respondents indicate which style is most and least like their own. Lantz says she usually sees four coreleadership styles emerge from these assessments. Individuals often tend to be a combination of styles, each with their own strengths and weaknesses.

 

"To get the best results on a team, it’s important to have a balance of different styles and also to get to a place of appreciating the other styles, as well," she says. Look for your own style in these four types.

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The Physics of Leadership - George Ambler On Leadership

The Physics of Leadership - George Ambler On Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
One of the laws of physics states that “for every reaction there is an equal and opposite reaction”.

 

One of the laws of physics states that “for every reaction there is an equal and opposite reaction”. The same is true for leadership, “for every action a leader takes there is a corresponding reaction from followers”.

 

This simple truth is often over-looked by leaders, as leaders we often under estimate the influence we have over followers.


Via Sparktheaction
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