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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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The Three Essential Elements of Leadership

The Three Essential Elements of Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Mark Hoplamazian, CEO of Hyatt Hotels, tells future leaders to listen, have clarity of purpose and be authentic.

 

Mark Hoplamazian jumps in with both feet.

 

When the Philadelphia-area native was asked to lead Hyatt Hotels Corp. as interim president in 2006, he said yes, even though he didn’t have any experience in the industry.

 

“I didn’t know anything about the hotel business. Well, I knew a little bit—like I stayed in a lot of hotels,” he told Wharton students at the first Leadership Lecture of the 2012-13 academic year.

Hoplamazian, who graduated from Chicago’s Booth School of Business in 1989 and had previously worked in private equity, dedicated himself to learning as much as he could about his employees, Hyatt and hotel management. He spent this intense learning period asking questions and listening to colleagues.  This experience, in addition to his experiences before Hyatt, brought Hoplamazian to a conclusion about a fundamental virtue of leadership.

 

“One key essential element in being in a position to lead is being a great listener, and applying yourself to it in a very sincere way,” he said.

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Decisions That Destroy A Leader’s Legacy

Decisions That Destroy A Leader’s Legacy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

John Maxwell once commented on the time it typically takes to develop your leadership. The first few years in the organization is spent building relationships and showing your worth by the production you do. From years 5 to 7, you begin to see real traction as people recognize your leadership skill and contributions.


After year seven, you begin to see results from your reputation in the community. This is why, he points out, if you continually move – from one job to another, from one place to another – you will have difficulty experiencing the larger returns on your leadership. They just don’t come quickly. When you do stick it out, through the good and the bad over the years, you can enjoy some great rewards as a leader.


Amazingly, all those years of hard work, dedication, and sacrifice for your vision, can be wiped out so much quicker than you created it. A legacy of great achievement can be removed from the public memory because of a gross violation of leadership ethics.

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Being Quiet

Being Quiet | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
 Wise men, when in doubt whether to speak or to keep quiet, give themselves the benefit of the doubt, and remain silent.

 

Many of us are continually re-learning the wisdom that tells us when it’s important to stay quiet. Yet that is what important conversations should strive for – lots of pauses and silence ripe with thought and ideas. I understand that there is a discomfort in silence in our noisy world. However, silence it’s also one of your most important leadership tools.


Aside from the wisdom of Napoleon Hill in the quote above, there are other times when keeping quiet is the best response you can make to someone:


When someone else is talking: It goes without saying that many of us can get better at allowing another person to have their say. Don’t interrupt. Wait for a pause in the conversation before you speak.


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Ten Ways to Get People to Change

Ten Ways to Get People to Change | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Change doesn't  occur by magic, and if you want someone to change their behaviour, you need to adopt an effective approach that will encourage them to make the changes required.

 

The challenge for business owners and managers seeking to change the behavious of individuals or teams, is to ensure that you have many levers that you can pull, to ensure that the required outcome is achieved.

 

This excellent article, identifies 10 such levers, and suggests that leaders need to use them all to achieve lasting behavioural change.


Via Daniel Watson, Richard Andrews
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Why Are Creative Leaders So Rare?

Why Are Creative Leaders So Rare? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Drawing from his experience, Dr Kalam articulated eight key tenets of creative leadership that are critical for driving innovation and growth in the emerging global knowledge economy:

 

Recently, our Centre for India & Global Business at Cambridge University was privileged to host a talk by Dr A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, the former President of India. Like millions of Indians, I hold Dr Kalam in high esteem. Not only is he an accomplished scientist who fathered India's breakthrough space programs (including an unmanned moon mission), but he also embodies India's diversity and openness: he served as India's third Muslim president, and can recite by heart entire passages of the Bible and the Bhagavad Gita.

 

Dr Kalam's lecture at our School was titled "Creative Leadership in the Global Knowledge Economy." In his engaging talk, Dr Kalam overviewed the dramatic socio-economic and technological shifts occurring worldwide, as the geopolitical and economic gravity shifts from West to East, the pace of technological change accelerates, and the world grapples with the increasing scarcity of resources.


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8 Google Chrome Extensions to Boost Your Productivity

8 Google Chrome Extensions to Boost Your Productivity | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Save yourself some keystrokes and distraction with these handy Chrome extensions.

Via Rick Maresch
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How to Get Your Boss to Say Yes, Part 1

How to Get Your Boss to Say Yes, Part 1 | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively.

 

The ability to sell an idea or project to your boss is critical to your success. If you can’t get your boss’s approval when you need it, you are not going to go very far in your career. In this three-part series I share six steps for doing it more effectively. In this post, I cover the first two steps.


When I was in corporate management, I spent a great deal of time listening to proposals. Those doing the pitching usually needed my approval to proceed with their project. Frankly, I was amazed at how poorly most people do in these kinds of situations...

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Jacqueline Novogratz of Acumen Fund, on Pairs of Values

Jacqueline Novogratz of Acumen Fund, on Pairs of Values | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
So if we could only have more leaders who would start by just listening, just trying to understand what’s going wrong from the perspective of the people you’re supposed to serve

 

Leaders can get stuck in groupthink because they’re really not listening, or they’re listening only to what they want to listen to, or they actually think they’re so right that they’re not interested in listening. And that leads to a lot of suboptimal solutions in the world.

 

The kind of leaders we need — and certainly that I aspire to be — reject ideology, reject trite assumptions, reject the status quo, and are really open to listening to solutions from people who are most impacted by the problems.

 

I’ll often say at Acumen that you’ve got to learn to listen with your whole body. Lean in and pay attention not only to what someone is saying, but also to their body language and their level of comfort or discomfort. You have to learn to ask questions in a way that will elicit more nuanced answers, rather than the answers you would like to get.

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7 Ways To Stimulate Your Capacity For Creativity

7 Ways To Stimulate Your Capacity For Creativity | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
A Frenchman walks into a bar with a duck on his head, and the bartender asks, “Hey, where’d you get that?

 

A Frenchman walks into a bar with a duck on his head, and the bartender asks, “Hey, where’d you get that?” So the duck says “I got it in Paris, they’ve got millions of ’em there.”

 

Jokes like this one are funny because the punch line just doesn’t fit with the “context” of the setup. It violates our expectations, and this has the power to give us a chuckle.

 

Human beings are constantly observing the environment in order to make mental predictions for what will happen next, given the context of their observations. I’ve already written about how important context is when it comes to customer relationships. The deeper the context of a relationship--that is, the more detailed or informative your previous interactions with a customer have been--the more loyal that customer is likely to be in the future, because (among other things) the customer just doesn’t want to have to re-teach one of your competitors what they’ve already spent time and effort teaching you.

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The currency of the new economy is trust

There's been an explosion of collaborative consumption -- web-powered sharing of cars, apartments, skills. Rachel Botsman explores the currency that makes systems like Airbnb and Taskrabbit work: trust, influence, and what she calls "reputation capital."


Via Peter C. Newton-Evans, David Hain
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16 Things Successful Leaders Never Do

16 Things Successful Leaders Never Do | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Not doing is one side of finding success.

 

What's your list of things you would never do as a leader?

 

How often do you violate it? Do you ask for this list when you interview managers and executives? How many "wrong" things do you catch them at doing on a daily basis? Do you coach them on the spot in how to never do that again.

 

 


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Barry Deutsch, Roger Francis
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How To Ask--And Listen--Like You Mean It

How To Ask--And Listen--Like You Mean It | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop. The deeper the questions, the deeper the listening; the deeper the listening, the deeper the next question. As we dig together with each tool, we mutually excavate new discoveries. As a result, the learning is never one-sided; it is a co-created process that engenders empathy, trust, and collaboration.

 

The Power Of Authentic Questions

 

Innovators working on solving problems and coming up with creative solutions rely on crafting the right questions. Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Not only do innovators make asking questions an integral part of their lives, and ask more questions than non-innovators, they also ask more provocative ones--questions that provoke deep insight and understanding. Developing other leaders through questioning not only helps them grow, but it forces them to own their unique learning experiences.

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Feedback Can Be Fun

Feedback Can Be Fun | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Why do people all over the world enjoy participating in games and sports? Why have games and sports been going on for not just centuries, but millennia? 

One of the theories is that they provide immediate feedback. 

The batter in a neighborhood game of softball knows immediately if he hits or misses the ball. If it is hit, it is clear whether it is in bounds or a foul ball. It’s clear if it bobbles into the infield or sails over the fence for a home run. The tennis player learns immediately how the angle of the racket and the strength of the swing can cause the ball to be returned too low and hit the net or if it is hit too high and too hard it goes out of bounds. Indeed, a good part of the joy and appeal of every sport is this immediate feedback. It also enables the player to make an infinite number of adjustments necessary to improve performance.

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Leaders: Know Yourself and the Power of Belief

Leaders: Know Yourself and the Power of Belief | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
  Abby is undeniably beautiful. Soulful eyes, flowing hair, articulate, alert. She is fiercely loyal and protective of those she loves. Everyone sees her potential, but she’s stuck by the limitations of her past.

 

All of us struggle at times with negative thoughts, either from learned patterns of bad relationships or from distorted perspectives we have been tempted to pick up along the way.
And, you have probably noticed that you can’t change your behavior without changing the thoughts behind your behavior.


What new perspective or attitude can I adopt today that will affect how I lead tomorrow?


As a leader, knowing yourself—your beliefs, your attitudes, your values—inevitably brings up the following questions –


Via The e.MILE Community
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Organize Your Chaotic Life NOW

Organize Your Chaotic Life NOW | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Last week, I booked a date with two friends and at the same time and date.  Yesterday, I forgot to meet my sister for lunch. 


A month ago, I forgot that I had to enrol, so I’m officially on LOA for my Master’s Degree.  If you can relate to this sordid state of affairs, then you have a problem. Being disorganized can be attributed to some factors. One, you’re just not the organized type; you’d rather be spontaneous. Two, you have way too many commitments to fulfill, you can’t keep track of all of them anymore.  Three, you love procrastinating; your to-do list is akin to the longest Apple peel (purportedly 172 feet, 4 inches), while your done list runs on empty. Four, you’ve been forgetful since you were a toddler. 


Still can relate? 


Welcome to the Club of Disorganized Chaos! Fortunately, you can do something about this.

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How to Uncover Your Greatest Value

How to Uncover Your Greatest Value | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The people you serve determine the value you bring.

 

The owners of a growing company didn’t appreciate the greatest value they brought their customers. Surprisingly, it wasn’t their products and services.

 

Their best customers said:

 

1. They understand us and our business.

 

2. They take the time to understand the way we do things.

 

3. I want to hear their recommendations because I feel like they understand us.

 

4. I know I can trust them because they didn’t try to sell me the most expensive product.

 

The owners didn’t realize:

 

I asked the owners to predict what customers said when I asked about their greatest value. They couldn’t predict it. When I told them the first thing their customers said was, “I feel like they understand our business.” A light came on.

 

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Want to be unhappy? Trying to be happy will do it!

Want to be unhappy? Trying to be happy will do it! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Despite being the richest nation on earth, the United States is, according to the World Health Organization, by a wide margin, also the most anxious, with nearly a third of Americans likely to suffer from an anxiety problem in their lifetime. America's precocious levels of anxiety are not just happening in spite of the great national happiness rat race, but also perhaps, because of it.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Be Happier: 10 Things to Stop Doing Right Now

Be Happier: 10 Things to Stop Doing Right Now | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Sometimes the route to happiness depends more on what you don't do.

 

Happiness--in your business life and your personal life--is often a matter of subtraction, not addition.

 

Consider, for example, what happens when you stop doing the following 10 things:

 

1. Blaming.

 

People make mistakes. Employees don't meet your expectations. Vendors don't deliver on time.

So you blame them for your problems.

 

But you're also to blame. Maybe you didn't provide enough training. Maybe you didn't build in enough of a buffer. Maybe you asked too much, too soon.

 

Taking responsibility when things go wrong instead of blaming others isn't masochistic, it's empowering--because then you focus on doing things better or smarter next time.

 

And when you get better or smarter, you also get happier....

 

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Via Gary Morrison
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Traditional leader vs Collaborative leader via @Co_Lead

Traditional leader vs Collaborative leader  via @Co_Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The workplace is changing. The leadership is changing. The future is collaborative.


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, AlGonzalezinfo
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Thinking things and doing things

Thinking things and doing things | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

I and some friends we are already preparing (co-organizing) an event called Braga Sustainability Jam that will happen between 2 and 4 November.

 

Faced with a few possible discrepancies (failures) between what we think and what we will do later, I decided to reflect a little more on what causes some differences (sometimes significant) between what we think and what we do.

 

The first idea that came to me, maybe intuitively, is that when we do we are not always thinking on what we do. That is, we have a great starting point, full of enthusiasm, but then our convictions run aground on a reality not drawn.

 

To put it another way, there is a difference between designing a project and implement a project or if you like, there are big differences between the conception, the construction and execution of something like a project.

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Teaching Children the Art of Self-Control

Teaching Children the Art of Self-Control | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Almost everything the self is or does is tied in some way to self-regulation.


One of the most important responsibilities that parents take on when they have children is teaching them to regulate their thoughts, emotions and behavior. 

But how do we teach our children the art of "self-control"?


And more importantly, have we mastered this art as an adult?

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The 8 Strengths of Humility

The 8 Strengths of Humility | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Humble leaders are stronger than arrogant leaders.

 

I ask G.J. Hart, when he was CEO of Texas Roadhouse, if he could spot emerging leaders. He didn’t rule out talent, education, or leadership presence, but he replied, “I can usually tell if they have the humility to make it.”

 

Hart’s statement so deeply impacted me that I wrote about humility in, “The Character Based Leader.”


Humble leaders are stronger than arrogant leaders.

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The Power of Defining the Problem

The Power of Defining the Problem | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Before you start solving a problem, you have to ask the right questions.

 

Well-defined problems lead to breakthrough solutions. When developing new products, processes, or even businesses, most companies aren't sufficiently rigorous in defining the problems they're attempting to solve and articulating why those issues are important. Without that rigor, organizations miss opportunities, waste resources, and end up pursuing innovation initiatives that aren't aligned with their strategies. How many times have you seen a project go down one path only to realize in hindsight that it should have gone down another?

 

 

How many times have you seen an innovation program deliver a seemingly breakthrough result only to find that it can't be implemented or it addresses the wrong problem?

 

Many organizations need to become better at asking the right questions so that they tackle the right problems.

 

Here are three stories of organizations in very different fields that did a spectacular job of defining the problem. This in turn attracted the right kind of innovators and led to breakthrough solutions.


Via Jose Luis Yañez, Gary Morrison
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7 Reasons Why Many Smart People Fail to Lead

7 Reasons Why Many Smart People Fail to Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You have seen these people – the best of the best in the lot. They get promoted to become the leaders and all hell breaks loose. They are not only frustrated but they will also royally frustrate their followers.

 

Here are seven reasons why this might be happening:

 

[Note: Replace "You" with the appropriate person as applicable......)


Via Jose Luis Yañez
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