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Serving and Leadership
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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How to keep employees you can't afford to lose

How to keep employees you can't afford to lose | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Even in this sluggish job market, your best people always have other offers. Here’s how to entice them to stick around.

 

Even in this sluggish job market, your best people always have other offers. Here's how to entice them to stick around.

 

Dear Annie: I liked your column about the art of quitting gracefully, but unfortunately several of my most talented and experienced direct reports seem to have read it, too. Three of them have quit (gracefully) in the past three weeks, and certain others seem less enthusiastic about their jobs than they used to be, so I'm worried about losing them as well.

 

The problem around here is that we had to lay off almost half the staff during the worst of the recession and, now that business has picked up again to some extent, top management is telling us to keep right on "doing more with less." Everyone has been overworked, including me, and the same budget constraints that preclude hiring more people are also standing in the way of my being able to offer my stars more money. I can't be the only boss who's struggling with this. Any suggestions? — Low-Budget Blues

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5 Simple Ways to Get Motivated at Work

5 Simple Ways to Get Motivated at Work | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Ever tried to get motivated at the office—but found that nothing works? Here's how you can redesign your workday in a way that gets you moving.

 

Have you ever tried to “get motivated” at the office—but nothing works? You start to feel terrible, like you’re falling behind in your business or career. You’re bored, lethargic, and you don’t want to meet up with your friends because you don’t want to talk about what you’ve been doing. (Or, more accurately, what you haven’t been doing.)

 

I’ve totally been there, too, and I’ve felt the frustration that comes from a lack of motivation at work.

 

But I’ve also got some good news. There are some key things that contribute to your work being motivating (or not), and once you recognize them, you have the power to redesign your workday in a way that gets you moving.

 

Here are five things you should make sure you’re getting out of your day-to-day tasks—and if you’re not, the changes you can make to jump start your motivation.

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How Managers Get in the Way

How Managers Get in the Way | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
“Most of what we call management consists of
making it difficult for people to get their work done.”
Peter Drucker

 

Four ways managers get in the way:

 

1. Meddling – Managers that roadblock work stay too close and talk too much. Your people want you to let them work. Stop by to encourage and ask questions, briefly. Express interest, give direction, and get out of the way. Stay close enough to monitor progress.

 

2. Meetings – Too many meetings that include too many people that share too much detail. Meetings are expensive. A one hour meeting with 8 people in attendance costs their combined salaries plus lost productivity. Remember, you don’t get anything done in a meeting. Things get done after meetings. Send a memo.

 

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Great Leaders Serve - Today’s Challenge: Personal Focus (Part 2)

Great Leaders Serve - Today’s Challenge: Personal Focus (Part 2) | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Each Friday, I attempt to answer a question submitted by a leader from somewhere in the world. This is part two on the topic of focus. (If you missed Part 1, here’s the link.) This week,Today’s Challenge: How do I (as the leader) maintain focus?


As leaders, we’re pulled in more directions than Stretch Armstrong. It seems that everyone wants our time and attention. Although it is a great feeling to be needed, we still need to find ways to maintain OUR focus. Here are a few ideas that may help.

 

Set your priorities in advance. This does not mean that your priorities won’t ever change – they will. But as you think about an upcoming week or month, ask yourself: what would success look like? 


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Leadership Blog: 50 Great Things Leaders Do

Leadership Blog: 50 Great Things Leaders Do | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Treat everyone as if they are special because they are. Wow! This one can make or break any relationship. Unconditional communication- it’s called listening. What are you passionate about?


Via Kevin Watson
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The Word I Don’t Hear Much

The Word I Don’t Hear Much | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
“Leaders who think more about what they get than what they give can’t be trusted.

 

“We have a crisis in leadership. Confidence in leaders continues to decline. At the same time, our current financial situation says we are in disparate need of leaders.”

 

“Would you trust your leaders to babysit your children?” John Baldoni.

 

Leadership begins with trust. Acting in the best interest of others builds trust. Self-interest, at the expense of others, destroys trust.

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Leading Change: How Great Leaders Deal with Criticism

Leading Change: How Great Leaders Deal with Criticism | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Several qualities distinguish the ‘great leaders’ from the ‘not so great leaders’, but there is one specific quality that is often overlooked or underestimated, and that is how great leaders deal with criticism.

 

Today’s leaders are dealing with an exponential change rate, and with information and communication channels that are easier accessible, faster and more widespread than ever before. Leaders are exposed to external influences and pressures that are less predictable and more quickly come and go. Leading change requires leaders to cope with this higher level of complexity. It also means that they, as part of their job, will almost inevitably face criticism in many occasions.


Great leaders are aware of this and deal with criticism constructively. They see it as a normal part of their role and they approach it with an open mind. They have a fundamental and positive impact on the change, precisely because they deal with criticism effectively.

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Slow Down To See More

Slow Down To See More | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
We are so busy judging, projecting, perceiving, conjecturing that we have little time for the unknown of our knowing. But sometimes there is a little voice, that stops us in our tracks and we take a double take or take a second guess.

 

If you look at the above images from your seat in front of the computer, you can see Mr. Angry is on the left and Ms. Calm is on the right.
 
Now stop and take another look, this time squint at your computer, and what do you see?
 
Can you see how they switched places?
 
For many of us when our reality is revealed we stop investigating.
 
We take life at face value and we rarely take a moment to stop and look beneath the surface.
 
Why?
 
Because we seldom take the time to look for answers when we feel there is no question.

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Leadership: Thinking from the bottom upwards

Leadership: Thinking from the bottom upwards | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Leadership: According to professor Graham Jones, too many senior leaders adopt a top-down approach to their roles.

 

Organisational structures are almost always drawn with leaders at the top, and leaders are expected to inspire followership among 'the people below. Too often, I come across that dreadful word 'subordinates' in organisations, which further perpetuates the unchallenged notion of leaders being on top directing their minions who cater to their every whim. And when leaders talk about 'cascading' their vision within the organisation, there is only one direction anything will ever cascade!

 

So the language, ethos, and culture in the vast majority of organisations perpetuates and exacerbates what has become an unchallenged protocol that leaders should adopt a top-down approach to leadership. But what if leaders turned their profession on its head and adopted a 'bottom-line' approach?


Via Kevin Watson
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10 Things You Need to Learn to Live a Super-Happy Life

10 Things You Need to Learn to Live a Super-Happy Life | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Happiness comes in many forms. To bring out the best in you and help you live a super-happy life, there are 10 things that you need to learn.

 

The older we get, the more that we experience life and the more that we learn what truly makes us happy.

 

Personally, happiness has always been an intriguing point of interest for me. I have always seen happiness as the epitome of all success that life can bring. If you’re happy, then surely you’ve got everything sorted, right? What more could you want?

 

Happiness comes in many forms. The good thing is it can be extremely different from person to person. Why is this a good thing? You can tailor everything you do in your life to bring out the happiness in you. There are however, a number of key themes that span across all individuals for finding happiness.

 

To bring out the best in you and help you live a super-happy life, there are 10 things that you need to learn.

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Mentoring Matters

Mentoring Matters | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
After nearly 20 years of working with people, building teams, and leading people, I have learned that there are many Biblical truths which can be applied daily.

 

After nearly 20 years of working with people, building teams, and leading people, I have learned that there are many Biblical truths which can be applied daily. For instance, Romans 1:18 clearly explains why unrighteous people refuse to see the truths about themselves and their sinful condition. In the ESV version of the Bible, Romans 1:18 reads, “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth.”  Paul wrote this epistle to explain why the people who see the truth of God all around them – systems designed beyond the capabilities of today’s best engineers, anthropic principles that if off even the slightest of amounts would not have supported mankind, and proofs (cosmological, teleological, and natural theology) that point towards a Creator – suppress and reject it. Interestingly, Paul, in apparent anticipation of today faithless age, captured nearly 2,000 years ago the reason why people chronically suppress truth.


Certainly Paul’s statement was intended to reflect the suppression of the truth of God, but it has secondary applications as well. For example, even today’s secular leadership manuals teach the importance of “confronting reality,” the same principle Paul expounded above. Leaders have learned that people do not like dealing with uncomfortable truths of any size. Whether that truth is a major – the existence of God – or as small – miscommunication with a co-worker – people quickly suppress the truth, allowing themselves to be held blameless while the other parties is held responsible for any issues. Consequently, most people never fulfill their leadership potential because they are too busy suppressing truth to learn from it.

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Entrepreneurial leadership -- even if you're not an entrepreneur

Entrepreneurial leadership -- even if you're not an entrepreneur | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
I've noticed a consistent quality of entrepreneurial leadership: It is the genuine feeling, infused into your business persona, of ownership.

 

The U.S. has a love affair with entrepreneurship, and it’s no big surprise. Our founding mythology is built on the stories of loners, tribes and rebels. Entrepreneurship is the ultimate definition of modern freedom — accountability only to yourself. No more “workin’ for the man” (or wo-man). Entrepreneurs who have attained such freedom are powerful, and they don’t take guff from “the system.”

 

Those who’ve braved the entrepreneurial seas know it’s not always smooth sailing, of course. Cash flow has a way of sitting heavy on your freedom when it’s not flowing, and being a company of one can be pretty lonely sometimes. If you’re workin’ for the wo-man, I recommend you talk to some seasoned entrepreneurs before you jump ship from the cruise liner to the dingy.

 

Make sure the course you’re about to set is the right one for you, your family and your lifestyle.

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The Anatomy Of A CEO @ Pinfographics

The Anatomy Of A CEO @ Pinfographics | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
The Anatomy Of A CEO Infographic is one of the best Infographics created in the category. Check out The Anatomy Of A CEO now!

Via sylviaunlimited, John van den Brink
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3 Things to Be Ready for When You Chase Your Career Dreams

3 Things to Be Ready for When You Chase Your Career Dreams | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
It can feel liberating to finally chase your dream career. It can also be scary and frustrating. Here are some tips from someone who’s been there.

 

We’re told from the time we’re born that we can grow up to be anything we want. Our parents, teachers and guardians instill the belief that the sky’s the limit and anything is possible.

 

Yet as we age and go on to high school, college and finally the real world, our options slowly begin to seem fewer and farther between.

 

But what changed between now and then?


Are we different people? Did our hopes, dreams and priorities change? Or maybe we just got comfortable?

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Want a great job? Then shave

Want a great job? Then shave | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Perception means a lot in the business world, and research suggests there's a bias when it comes to facial hair...

 

If you look at pictures of Fortune 500 CEOs, you might be in for a surprise. Very few have facial hair. In fact, hardly any do. The same is true of American political leaders. 

 

Why is that? What's the big hairy problem with leaders having facial hair? Clearly, it bucks the societal trend. Stubble, mustaches and beards of all kinds have been the rage for years. It's definitely cool to have facial hair. Just not if you're an executive or business leader. 

 

There are exceptions, of course. Steve Jobs grew a beard relatively late in life. Oracle CEO Larry Ellison has one. So do Marc Benioff of Salesforce.com, Reed Hastings of Netflix and Richard Branson of Virgin Group. But they're all founders of their companies. There's a different standard for successful entrepreneurs.

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Ann Hand: How do you know when it's time to leave?

Ann Hand: How do you know when it's time to leave? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Title:  How do you know when it's time to leave? Video:  Question:  How do you know when it's time to leave?
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The Psychology of Regret

The Psychology of Regret | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Should we live our lives with no regrets as the song tells us to?

 

Edith Piaf, the famous French singer sang "Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien." (I Have No Regrets). Should we follow her advice and try to live in the moment, without looking back and without any self-judgment? Or, can we sometimes learn valuable lessons by analyzing our behavior and its consequences. Read on to find out what the research tells us about this ubiquitous and complicated emotion.


What is Regret?

 

Regret is a negative cognitive/emotional state that involves blaming ourselves for a bad outcome, feeling a sense of loss or sorrow at what might have been or wishing we could undo a previous choice that we made.


Via Melanie Greenberg, Gina Stepp
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When Setting Expectations Doesn't Work

When Setting Expectations Doesn't Work | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Guest author Garret Kramer suggests that if setting stricter standards doesn’t eliminate hurtful and disruptive behavior, we must point people instead toward the state of mind that creates the behavior.

 

At my daughter’s summer camp, counselors have made a concerted effort over the past several years to eliminate bullying, wayward behavior, and mischief. In fact, the camp owner and management team recently decided to advertise their camp as an environment where meanness has no place. And, as such, this camp season they required all campers and parents to sign a code-of-conduct agreement where twenty-two camper expectations were listed in detail. Sounds reasonable and responsible, yes?

 

Well, regrettably, in spite of their sound intentions, behavior at this camp has not improved — it’s gotten worse. And this summer, several campers were repeatedly disciplined and threatened with expulsion for their unruly actions.

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Don't scrape the chairs

Don't scrape the chairs | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

I was meeting with a good friend and fellow coach recently and like many of these meetings it was held in a motorway service station for our mutual convenience.

 

We were sitting almost alone, as you can see from the photo I took of our surroundings, when one of the waiting-staff came to clear the tables. This she did. She also straightened chairs. Well, I say straightened chairs, actually what she did was scrape the chairs back under the table which made the most annoying and due to the pre-fabricated nature of the part of the building we were in, incredibly loud noise. We couldn’t hear ourselves speak.

 

And there must have been about thirty chairs to straighten and our dedicated member of the waiting-team decided to scrape chairs back into place not once, but twice in the time we were there.

 

It was a clear case of not being able to take in the details and context of her surroundings. It showed a lack of self-awareness and empathy beyond the task at hand.

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Once upon a time: The importance of storytelling in leadership

Once upon a time: The importance of storytelling in leadership | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Stories work for leaders as a successful communication technique for several reasons. Storytelling translates dry and abstract numbers into compelling pictures of a leader’s goals. Stories convey emotion effectively, and emotion united with a strong idea is persuasive. We remember what we feel and our emotions inspire us to take action. Charts can leave listeners bemused; documents remain unread and dialogue is just too laborious and slow.

 

Although good business cases are developed through the use of numbers, when faced with the task of persuading others to get enthusiastic about a major change, storytelling is the only thing that works. Stories are memorable: research claims that we are up to 22 times more likely to remember a story than a set of disconnected facts.


Via Gregg Morris, David Hain, Roy Sheneman, PhD, Roger Francis
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Fighting Back or Playing Nice: How Employees React to Bullying Bosses

Fighting Back or Playing Nice: How Employees React to Bullying Bosses | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

It’s no secret that supervisor aggression is a serious issue facing many organizations with a wide range of consequences from retaliation and turnover to lawsuits. However, little attention has been given to the reasons why employees react differently to perceptions of supervisor aggression.

 

While it is unlikely that all instances of supervisor aggression will completely stop within any given organization, it is possible to help shape how employees will react to those situations. Most research focuses on the deconstructive reactions (e.g., getting even with their boss or taking it out on a co-worker) with less emphasis on the constructive reactions (e.g. finding an effective solution to the problem).

 

So, what factors come into play that causes an employee to have a constructive or deconstructive reaction to their boss’ aggressive behaviors....


Via Charney Coaching & Consulting, AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
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Incivility in Leadership

Incivility in Leadership | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Shortly after the investigation, all who were involved in testifying were eventually terminated from the organization. Reasons included lack of productivity, spreading malicious rumors, and just not showing enthusiasm. The leader accused of the affair was not reprimanded and an apology was given to the leader with a promotion.


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The Practice of Empathy

The Practice of Empathy | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

A client of mine is totally fed up with his boss. He has recently undergone quite a difficult, uncomfortable operation – the second in a series. Since then, there have been several interactions with his boss. Not once has he been asked how he is; worse, the task heat is full-on with a series of late night conference calls, led by the boss who always requires my client’s attendance. Amazed by the complete lack of empathy shown by his boss, my client is fast losing trust in him.

 

Empathy is right at the core of trusted relationships. If someone is genuinely on our side, interested in what we are thinking and feeling, and intent on helping us out – then we feel safer with them, readier to talk about what is uncomfortable and challenging for us, and more prepared to give them our trust.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Can You Balance More Than One Business?

Can You Balance More Than One Business? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
One business can be all-consuming, but for some restless entrepreneurs, it's not enough. Here's how to know if you can handle the juggle

 

 

Most small-business owners will tell you that they need to be efficient multi-taskers in order for their business to run smoothly. But, some business owners have to be more than efficient at handling multiple responsibilities, especially when they own more than one business.

 

Serial entrepreneurs are a special breed. They have the ability to focus on a variety of tasks that sometimes vary like night and day. They seemingly balance apples and oranges with grace, making it appear easy. But, interestingly enough, most would not recommend the average business owner juggle multiple businesses.

 

“I would only recommend this course to entrepreneurs who are extremely focused, self-motivated, self-disciplined and easily bored,” says Aimee Elizabeth, author of Poverty Sucks! How to Become a Self-Made Millionaire.

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What biz leaders can learn from jazz - Fortune Management

What biz leaders can learn from jazz - Fortune Management | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Unlike business school, jazz shows us that following others is, in its own way, a higher form of leadership. Here's why companies should take note.

 

"Lead, follow, or get out of the way" -- that old adage pretty much sums up conventional wisdom about the corporate pyramid. At the top are the chief executives who give us direction. Next come the followers, who fall in line behind (unless they want to be part of the problem). At the base is everyone else -- the ones who muddle around and obstruct the way. Little wonder that boards, investors, and other stakeholders become so fixated on identifying CEOs who can fill the role of fearless leader, however huge the raid he or she might entail on the corporate coffers.

 

Once, most CEOs rose through the ranks to take control of a company they knew intimately. Now, CEOs are just as likely to be chosen from outside, rather than promoted from within. 

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