Surviving Leadership Chaos
69.3K views | +11 today
Follow
Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
Curated by donhornsby
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Act Now! 3 Leadership Lessons on Handling Life’s Emergencies

Act Now! 3 Leadership Lessons on Handling Life’s Emergencies | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

“Act today only, tomorrow is too late.”–English proverb

donhornsby's insight:

Unforeseen circumstances are never a pleasant experience, but a level head and willingness to act are paramount to our ultimate survival. What’s your emergency strategy?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Challenge the Process without Blowing Up

Challenge the Process without Blowing Up | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You’re surrounded by stagnation because last week’s great idea is next week’s dying system. Systems defend themselves and gradually grow stale until crisis confronts and changes them.

 

Every system was someone’s great idea once.

donhornsby's insight:

Successful leaders challenge the process before crisis arrives.

 

What are the ways not to challenge the process?


How can leaders effective challenge the process?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

3 Tools to Break Through the Noise

3 Tools to Break Through the Noise | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why the art of storytelling is important to your future. 3 Tools to Break Through the Noise
donhornsby's insight:

We’ve all heard that your brand and your platform are important to your success.  But what if, after all of your platform and branding work, you are lost in a sea of competing messages?

more...
donhornsby's curator insight, September 30, 2013 9:28 AM

We’ve all heard that your brand and your platform are important to your success.  But what if, after all of your platform and branding work, you are lost in a sea of competing messages?

Rescooped by donhornsby from Coaching in Education for learning and leadership
Scoop.it!

What Kind of Leader Are You?

What Kind of Leader Are You? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Your employees might have you pegged, but how well do you know yourself?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Ariana Amorim, Les Howard
more...
Nadia Edwards-Dashti's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:20 AM

Great infographic we should all take something from!

Eliane Fierro's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:35 PM

¿Te conoces bien como líder?

Jerry Busone's curator insight, February 9, 2014 8:54 AM

Go ahead take the test and se where you land... you might surprise yourself...

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Career Boot Camp: 5 Steps To Become A Better Presenter

Career Boot Camp: 5 Steps To Become A Better Presenter | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Want to be seen as a leader, build workplace credibility, and get noticed by management? Then become a better presenter. Take your presentation skills from so-so to superb with these five simple steps.
donhornsby's insight:

Here are five steps to help you utilize every presentation as an opportunity to demonstrate your capabilities and leadership attributes:

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The 4 Brain Essential Learning Steps [Infographic]

The 4 Brain Essential Learning Steps [Infographic] | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Let's look at Brain Essential Learning Steps. In other words, how does the brain process information in the learning process

Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, September 29, 2013 6:32 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Infographic

 

Trevor Galbraith's curator insight, September 29, 2013 11:42 PM

Simple reminder to what we in the classroom are on about

Allan Shaw's curator insight, September 29, 2013 11:58 PM

Thanks Gust! While not essentially digital in construction, this infographic is useful in designing good learning.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Leadership: 5 Simple Moves to Engage Employees #peopleskills

Leadership: 5 Simple Moves to Engage Employees #peopleskills | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leadership for Employee Engagement: Does morale have to suffer in tough times? No! 5 easy shifts to engage employees.

donhornsby's insight:

The behavior of leaders and managers at all levels, including supervisors, team leads, and project managers, shapes culture and outcomes. Leaders who see their own behavior clearly and shift to engage employees transform results. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Leadership
Scoop.it!

4 Powerful Things Leaders Should Know About Vulnerability

4 Powerful Things Leaders Should Know About Vulnerability | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Research professor Brené Brown explains the ways uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure are essential to a successful entrepreneur journey.

Via Chery Gegelman
donhornsby's insight:

Why vulnerability is the first thing you look for in other people, but the last thing you want to reveal in yourself.

more...
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:55 PM

Interesting video for all executives.

Rescooped by donhornsby from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

Don’t Take the Wrong Paths to Power

Don’t Take the Wrong Paths to Power | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Forget the common good – it’s your own good that matters. Seek power, seize it, and hoard it. If you have to bruise egos along the way, so what? No one will care or even remember how you


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Ivon Prefontaine
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Pfeffer’s right about one thing: there are a thousand pathways to power and influence. If you are a lone wolf seeking power by any means, you may gain influence for a while at a cost of long-run success, and happiness. Success doesn’t come from stepping on toes and hustling behind backs, but from stepping up, and having peoples’ backs. Exploiting others on a “Paths to Power” quest may get you rolling fast, but it won’t be long before you notice that you’re heading downhill – and taking your team with you.

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:35 AM

Jeffrey Pfeffer warns students to avoid getting unduly slowed down by ethics, modesty or ideals. Getting to the C-Suite isn’t a journey for do-gooders, he says, and worse, an overactive conscience can be "dangerous to one’s organizational survival.


I disagree with Pfeffer's Old Bowler perspective on the world.


He sees the stuggle for power as a zero-sum game. Either you win or you lose. Research suggests that your reciprocity style towards others actually matters when it comes to success in life - and the influence you gain.  For more on this matter read Adam Grant's book: Give and Take. 


Gisele HELOU's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:10 AM

Power is'nt grabbed. It's created and distributed.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 28, 2013 1:31 PM

We need leaders who do the right things.

Rescooped by donhornsby from MarketingHits
Scoop.it!

12 Tips on Staying Inspired #nfographic

12 Tips on Staying Inspired #nfographic | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Staying inspired all the time is impossible, but staying inspired at least for a little while every day is very important to achieving your goals. The infographic below gives us some very important tips on staying inspired.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
donhornsby's insight:

Nice summary of helpful things to keep you going...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Leadership--Are you a storyteller or 'story doer?"

Leadership--Are you a storyteller or 'story doer?" | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Building Resilience, Enhancing Performance

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 7:53 AM

Here is a terrific primer on leadership and storytelling that articulates the difference betwwen a leader who tells stories, and a leader who tells stories and moves people to action. And of course, it's the ability to move people to action with your stories that makes the diffeerence.


The author, Paul Mudd, discusses how leaders (read entrepreneurs, business owners and nonprofit directors) share stories to transmit knowledge, values, and life lessons. Of course, that means leaders need to be self-aware and comfortable sharing their personal stories. Mudd does a good job addressing this.


I remind people however that before a leader can tell tell tell stories, they have to earn the right to do so first. And that is not necessarily the priviledge of their position. Instead they need to cultivate the ability to listen to stories first, because listening is the first storytelling skill to master.


I just finished co-facilitating a leadership retreat with 56 women with friend and colleague Madelyn Blair. The entire 2-days we only use story-based tecniques and story listening as the foundation. The results are amazing and this is year 5 of deliving the retreat.


I hope Mudd tackles listening in an upcoming article. Until then, enjoy this piece that applies to us all. And check out the links to additional posts at the end of the article.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Don Cloud's curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:45 PM

Are you a storyteller or story doer?  Interesting insights into the differences.

Andrea Norwood's comment, October 1, 2013 1:08 PM
I am a little of both, the story teller in me talks about the intelligent of the human spider and how they want to be accepted for who they are spiders and become equal among the humans. The story doer in me creates the materials from my stroy about the spider.
Rescooped by donhornsby from #BetterLeadership
Scoop.it!

Nice or Tough: Which Approach Engages Employees Most?

Nice or Tough: Which Approach Engages Employees Most? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Neither, actually.

Via AlGonzalezinfo
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:11 PM

Very interesting read.  As usual, a balanced combination seems to be the key.

 

From the post:

 

In our view, the lesson then is that those of you who consider yourself to be drivers should not be afraid to be the “nice guy.” And all of you aspiring nice guys should not view that as incompatable with setting demanding goals. The two approaches are like the oars of a boat. Both need to be used with equal force to maximize the engagement of direct reports.

David Hain's curator insight, September 13, 2013 4:09 AM

In my experience, many "nice guys" fail to realise the reservoir of goodwill available to them. People pleasers should focus on respect, not being liked - that will come naturally.

Don Cloud's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:54 AM

Great article.  I would break it down more simply.

 

Leaders provide their people with what they need to succeed ... not what they want.  Sometimes, what folks need is inspiriation, motivation, and support.  Other times, certain individuals need a kick in the rear.  A true leader understands the difference ... understands what each individual AND what the team as a whole needs ... and provides that.  Like has nothing to do with it.

 

Something else to consider:  If a leader wants their people to succeed but is never tough and honest with someone who has issues that need improvement ... is that person setting their subordinate up for success (to learn) or failure (to get blindsided).  How will that person grow if the leader that they trust can't be trusted to provide honest, tough feedback.  And this even means that sometimes what an individual requires to be successful is to no longer be part of the team/group/organization.  Leaders make the tough calls.

 

The mentors I respect the most told me what I needed to hear and what I needed to do to improve.  Strong leaders who grow other strong leaders always provide their subordinates what they need.

Rescooped by donhornsby from Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

Management - Do you run your business or does it run you?

Management - Do you run your business or does it run you? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
One of the risks of running a business, especially as a soloist, is that it will take over your life. Here are four key ways to mitigate the risks.

Via Anthony M Turner, Natalie Stewart, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

Do you run your business or does it run you?

more...
John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's curator insight, September 12, 2013 8:08 AM

Good advice. I know many small and micro business owners who are prepared to sacrifice that which is outside their business, for the sake of what should be happening inside their business.

 

Following any (all?) of thse will help mitigate what might otherwise be costly...

Greg Lustig's curator insight, September 12, 2013 10:50 AM

Many if not most small business leaders are too busy creating business to effectively manage their business.Others simply are not good managers which is not a prerequisite for owning a business.In either case ,this results in a reactive management style as opposed to a proactive approach based on planning.Even in large corporations where actual management is delegated to the various members of the executive team,leadership can fall prey to the same challenges as they become too focused on producing projected results for their shareholders rather than actually managing the business.In such cases,the  business seems to take on a life of  its own In which its leaders are forced to react rather than manage.This can be avoided with foresight and careful planing for all foreseeable risks.

EZIA's curator insight, October 25, 2013 9:13 AM

No matter what anyone thinks about being a solo entrepreneur - you're still accountable for the productivity of your business and you will still wear the many hats it takes to have a successful business.  Don't think its a 9 to 5 job - as a business owner - you're always "on".

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

9 Good Intentions that Aggravate Your Team

9 Good Intentions that Aggravate Your Team | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

I  aggravate the teams I lead and the leaders I follow.  You do too, even when you’re trying to help.

 

Most aggravating leadership starts with good intentions.

donhornsby's insight:
9 Good Intentions that Aggravate Your Team

Beware of these easy traps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Mindful Mondays: Elephant or Chicken? | Eblin Group

Mindful Mondays: Elephant or Chicken? | Eblin Group | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

A client who frequently travels internationally told me a fascinating story recently.

 

My client is a regular visitor to Africa and told me about a safari tour guide he met in Botswana. This guide is so skilled and experienced at what he does that he can approach an 18,000 pound bull elephant with no fear of being charged. The guide and the elephant go eye to eye. The guests get great pics and the guide does it again on the next safari. He is at one with his environment.

donhornsby's insight:

It’s all about perspective. Where you stand depends on where you sit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

When You Need a Coach: Blind Spots Are Less Obvious When Things Are Going Well

When You Need a Coach: Blind Spots Are Less Obvious When Things Are Going Well | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Recent research by Stanford University and The Miles Group cite the massive gap between CEOs being receptive to coaching (95%) and the percentage who actually receive coaching (less than 33%). More often than not, this is due to the “stigma” that is still attached to coaching by both boards and CEOs, that it is “remedial” in nature rather than “performance enhancing”. 

donhornsby's insight:

Just as top athletes rely on the best coaches to push their performance to new heights, CEOs should consider executive coaches as vital to “performance enhancement.” Heinz CEO Bill Johnson, himself the son of a former NFL coach [Cincinnati Bengals] employs one for himself. “Why not?” says Johnson. “Tiger Woods has a coach.” When boards and other stakeholders recognize the value of executive coaching for their c-suite executives, the result can be the difference between having a good organization, with good people and having a great organization, with people who come together every day to create real, sustained value.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

7 Things You Need to Be More Magnetic

7 Things You Need to Be More Magnetic | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Want to be more engaging in conversation? Cultivate your charm by adopting these seven habits.


Via The Learning Factor, Margarida Sá Costa, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

My favorite people are direct and not afraid to share things about themselves that might even make them look bad. In doing so they convey a sense of humility, honesty, and vulnerability that work to lower people's defenses. If you can do that, you're well on your way to engaging with them.

more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 26, 2013 7:36 PM

Think of the most engaging people you know. My guess is they're charming, interesting, and make you feel special.

We all want to be perceived that way, don't we? Here are several character traits you should work on if you want to be magnetic and likeable.

Curiousity


By nature children are curious, but we lose much of our inquisitiveness as we age. Yet it's such a vital trait, especially in business. Curiousity drives you to continuously learn about your industry, understand your customers, and create innovative products.

Kristy Schofield's curator insight, September 28, 2013 6:40 PM

I believe this- especially with curiosity 

Rescooped by donhornsby from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Leadership Lessons From LEGO

Leadership Lessons From LEGO | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Many of the lessons learned in fatherhood apply, on a certain level, to change leadership. Here are the parallels between building a complex LEGO set and coaching a client through transformational change.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Look, as a leader, you set the tone for how your employees experience large-scale change. You could be the one that enables fearless (but informed) innovation and experimentation – or you can be the one holding up the instruction book saying, “That’s not how we do it.” The choice is yours.

more...
James Schreier's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:29 PM
This is very interesting article.
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:39 PM

The interchangeable parts is the one that stood out for me. It does not mean we are disposable, rather it means we have flexibility and can move into the foreground and background as necessary.

Joe Boutte's curator insight, September 24, 2013 9:48 PM

...and it takes time.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

How to Walk

How to Walk | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
We have forgotten how to walk. All we do is go places. A proper walk doesn’t have a destination. Gwyn Thomas put it this way, “But the beauty is in the walking -- we are betrayed by destinations.” ...
donhornsby's insight:

Walk slow enough and long enough to let wisdom find you.

more...
Don Cloud's curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:33 PM

Thanks for sharing!

 

To everyone else out there, how often have you "taken time to walk?"

 

It's a lost art and practice.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Ten Signs You're Committing Leadership Malpractice

Ten Signs You're Committing Leadership Malpractice | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
mal·prac·tice (māl-prāk'tĭs), noun any improper, negligent practice; misconduct or misuse immoral, illegal, or unethical professional conduct or neglect of professional duty the behavior of most ba...
donhornsby's insight:

The sad reality is there are too many leaders in organizations today guilty of malpractice. I believe that bad leadership accounts for the majority of dysfunctional behavior in organizations and our research has shown it can result in a financial cost equal to 7% of a company’s annual revenue. That’s over $1 million dollars for an organization with $15 million or more in annual sales.

So what does leadership malpractice look like, and to make this really personal, could you be guilty as charged? Here’s ten warning signs you may be committing leadership malpractice:

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Leadership
Scoop.it!

19 challenging thoughts about leadership 2nd edition

2nd edition of 19 challenging thoughts about leadership

Via David Hain, Chery Gegelman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Trust in leadership
Scoop.it!

Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, And The Power Of Humility In Leadership

Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, And The Power Of Humility In Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Humility is often associated with weakness - not with strong leaders. In his new book David J. Bobb explains why that's a mistake.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain, Fabrice De Zanet
donhornsby's insight:

Important concept for a leader. > HUMILITY ASKS US TO ACKNOWLEDGE OUR IMPERFECTIONS. IT REQUIRES THAT WE ADMIT WHEN WE ARE WRONG AND THEN CHANGE COURSE.

more...
Eliane Fierro's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:15 PM

¿Qué te detiene a para mostrar tu vulnerabilidad? La humildad es una fuente de fuerza profunda que genera liderazgo!

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, October 7, 2013 5:39 AM

It takes great strength to display humility:-)

Graeme Reid's curator insight, December 8, 2013 6:05 PM

It is very rare to meet a leader with real humility.  It is often seen as a weakness rather than a strength.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Innovation Excellence | Why We Need Conversational Intelligence

Innovation Excellence | Why We Need Conversational Intelligence | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
I have two questions for our readers for which I do not have the answer. First: How satisfied are you with the overall quality of conversations you have? Second: What can you do to make your conversations more productive?
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Understanding how using different words and communication styles impact the brain chemistry, aka, the hard-wiring and receptiveness of the people you work with, will help you build Conversational Agility, which Glaser describes as the ability to navigate at will, or toggle, between the three levels of Conversational Intelligence. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Business change
Scoop.it!

Why we need trust – and seven ways to build it

Why we need trust – and seven ways to build it | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
If I offer you my trust am I:

Agreeing with you
Doing what you ask of me
Offering robust feedback
Protecting your feelings
None of the above

What is considered a sign of trust to one may appear as a betrayal to another.

Via David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

We can earn and maintain the trust of others by agreeing on what it means in a particular context and then behaving in ways that deliver on those agreements.

more...
Don Cloud's curator insight, September 18, 2013 7:56 AM

Trust must first be given in order for others to then give their trust to you.

Scott Span, MSOD's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:13 AM

As I's said before, trust is the foundation of any great relationship both professional and personal! How are you building trust?

Linda Allen's comment, September 18, 2013 12:29 PM
Thank you for sharing; trust is key for all relationships.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Business Improvement
Scoop.it!

The Single Most Important Management Tool to Grow Your Business

The Single Most Important Management Tool to Grow Your Business | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Via John Michel, Daniel Watson
more...
Marcus Aldrin Andersson's curator insight, September 19, 2013 1:17 PM

Some insightfull thoughts on managing what is and what could be. 

Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 27, 2013 11:50 AM
Richard: Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 27, 2013 11:51 AM
Daniel: Thanks for sharing your wisdom. As a Change Management Specialist, resistance to change is the number 1 reason businesses fail to thrive or die.