Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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5 Silent Warnings that your Life is Unbalanced

5 Silent Warnings that your Life is Unbalanced | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The subtle equilibrium with which life remains life is so delicate that it takes little to turn order into chaos in a space of a moment.

 

Actually, while it seems to happen that way, the symptoms for unbalance begins way before they are seen and experienced but it requires for the mind to be conscious of its own perception and its own way of functioning to realize that. Simply put, it calls for a conscious way of living


Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

A great article to reflect upon...

 

(From the article): Pay attention to: excessive tendencies, feelings of guilt towards self and others, compulsive comportments.

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Margriet Darwinkel's curator insight, February 23, 2013 5:28 AM

Hoe kun je herkennen dat je uit balans bent of raakt .... #nieuwefamilies

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The Three Pillars of High Performance Teams

The Three Pillars of High Performance Teams | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Everyone serious about success is serious about teams. Great teams lift organizations. Lousy teams drain everyone.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): "Your team will never perform at the highest possible level if the members of the team don’t exhibit genuine care and concern for one another.”  - Mark Miller


Surprising benefit: Great teams mean you’re not alone.

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ARE YOU A SELF-ACTUALISER?

ARE YOU A SELF-ACTUALISER? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The process of self-actualization

Self-actualization means you know exactly who you are, where you are going, and what you want to accomplish in life. It is a state of well-being.


 


Via Bobby Dillard, Belinda MJ.B
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist and best known for his theory of the “Hierarchy of Needs”. The last step of his “Hierarchy of Needs” is “Self-actualization”. Abraham Maslow described here the ongoing process of fully developing the own potential. It is good to know that self-actualization is a process not a goal. It is a process that should slowly develop.

 

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11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader

11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Being likeable will help you in your job, business, relationships, and life. I interviewed dozens of successful business leaders for my last book, to determine what made them so likeable and their companies so successful.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The Golden Rule: Above all else, treat others as you’d like to be treated


By showing others the same courtesy you expect from them, you will gain more respect from coworkers, customers, and business partners. Holding others in high regard demonstrates your company’s likeability and motivates others to work with you. This seems so simple, as do so many of these principles — and yet many people, too concerned with making money or getting by, fail to truly adopt these key concepts.

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Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:32 AM
11 Concepts simples pour devenir un meilleur leader.

"Être sympathique vous aidera dans votre travail, des affaires, les relations et la vie. J'ai interviewé des dizaines de chefs d'entreprises prospères pour mon dernier livre, afin de déterminer ce qui les rendait si attachant et leurs entreprises un tel succès".


11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader via @juandoming http://sco.lt/...

Amanda Simmons's comment, February 20, 2013 3:41 PM
Wonderful post...thanks for sharing!
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The Top Ten Challenges in Time Management

The Top Ten Challenges in Time Management | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

We all have 168 hours a week. Yet, some people get so much more done than others. Furthermore, the people who get more done are usually less tired than those who are perpetually frustrated. What are some of the common obstacles keeping people from getting what they want, and what can be done to leap over these hurdles?


Via Daniel Watson, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Challenge 1: I don’t know what I want. The best way of overcoming this problem is to set aside a little time every day just to think. The most successful people in the world recognize the need for think time, and make a conscious effort to set that time aside. For many it becomes a kind of ritual.

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Daniel Watson's curator insight, February 19, 2013 10:05 PM


Time management tips abound everywhere, yet dispite the volume of advice made freely available, business owners as a whole, still seem to struggle to make more effective use of the time they have available to give to their business.


Obviously, tips alone are not enough change behaviour, and what appears to be needed is a clearer understanding of the challenges one faces and must overcome, to be better placed to make more effective use of time.


This excellent article, avoids providing the usual time management tips, and instead, it provides a list of 10 challenges business owners must work to overcome, before they can successfully make better use of their time.

Craig Slepsky's comment, February 26, 2013 10:18 AM
Time management must always be a first priority.
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A Great Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership

A Great Way to Teach Your Kids About Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

But if you ask my kids what I do,  they have a short answer, “my mom is a leader.”

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): They know because they live it.

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The Most Successful Leaders Do 15 Things Automatically, Every Day

The Most Successful Leaders Do 15 Things Automatically, Every Day | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Leadership is learned behavior that becomes unconscious and automatic over time. For example, leaders can make several important decisions about an issue in the time it takes others to understand the question.

Via YSC Online
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Beyond decision making, successful leadership across all areas becomes learned and instinctual over a period of time. Successful leaders have learned the mastery of anticipating business patterns, finding opportunities in pressure situations, serving the people they lead and overcoming hardships.

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Say Thank You, Thumper

Say Thank You, Thumper | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Everyone knows healthy relationships require effective communication, but are all communication strategies equal? Take Thumper's well-worn advice for instance: "If you can't say something nice don't say nuthin' at all." Is this really the way to go?


Via Gina Stepp
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Gratitude, like Thumper’s greens, is a “special treat,” fortifying our relationships with vital nutrients. A daily dose of thankfulness may not make for “long ears and great big feet,” but it protects us from attitudes that poison our communication and threaten our personal well-being. Fortunately, no matter how long we have been suffering from a gratitude deficiency, it’s never too late to add it to our family’s daily diet.

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9 Subtle Traits Of The Most Talented Leaders

9 Subtle Traits Of The Most Talented Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Good bosses look good on paper. Great bosses look great in person; their actions show their value.



Via Anne Egros
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Remarkable bosses don't scold or dictate; they work together with an employee to figure out what happened and what to do to correct the mistake.

 

They help find a better way, not a disciplinary way.

 

Great employees don't need to be scolded or reprimanded. They know what they did wrong.

 

Sometimes staying silent is the best way to ensure they remember.




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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, February 17, 2013 6:07 PM

8. They let employees have the ideas.

 

Years ago I worked in manufacturing and my boss sent me to help move the production control offices. It was basically manual labor, but for two days it put me in a position to watch and hear and learn a lot about how the plant's production flow was controlled.

I found it fascinating and later I asked my boss if I could be trained to fill in as a production clerk. Those two days sparked a lifelong interest in productivity and process improvement.

Years later he admitted he sent me to help move their furniture. "I knew you'd go in there with your eyes wide open," he said, "and once you got a little taste I knew you'd love it."

Remarkable bosses see the potential in their employees and find ways to let them have the ideas, even though the outcome was what they intended all along.




Catherine Baleda's curator insight, February 18, 2013 9:51 PM

"What you see isn't all you get."

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Even Whiners Can Lead

Even Whiners Can Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Whiners are potential leaders. But, pessimists can’t lead.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The next time you hear yourself whining, take responsibility. Stop complaining about what others aren’t doing. Do something yourself.

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Are Your Goals and Your Purpose the Same Thing?

Are Your Goals and Your Purpose the Same Thing? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of preachers when it comes to having goals. Self-help books and audio and video and live seminars abound with goal-setting and goal-achievement as a central tenet of their teaching.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Setting goals without knowing your purpose is a fruitless and unfulfilling business. Focusing on goals rather than purpose is epidemic in this world, and ignoring purpose altogether is quite common. So if goals stand in the way of the fulfillment of your purpose, they have to go, and they can go as they are not required.

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Listening – Its Importance to Leadership

Listening – Its Importance to Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Listening is an attitude, a mindset that dictates whether you are either self-centered or other-centered.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If you want to improve your listening skills, try this on for size. When another individual is speaking, wait two seconds after they have completed their sentence to make your observations.

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Kathleen Bartle's comment, February 20, 2013 7:03 PM
Yep, and stop thinking of a response. If you want to say something, as a clarifying question.
John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's comment, February 26, 2013 5:13 PM
Active listening. Try it. To hear is one thing; to listen, an entirely different thing. That and observation of verbal and body language tells you more than simply trying to get your view heard.
John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's curator insight, February 26, 2013 5:13 PM

Active listening. Try it. To hear is one thing; to listen, an entirely different thing. That and observation of verbal and body language tells you more than simply trying to get your view heard.

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Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are very different skills. Yet most of the time, we expect corporate executives to wow us with their detail-oriented approach to management and then suddenly metamorphose into visionary leaders the moment they’re promoted. It doesn’t usually work out, says Annmarie Neal, the author of the forthcoming Leading from the Edge (ASTD Press, 2013).

 

A leader is somebody who sees opportunity and puts change in motion. A manager is somebody who follows that leader and sees how to structure things to create value for the company,” she says. “I’ve found that the best leaders weren’t really good managers.


Via Bob Corlett, JLAndrianarisoa
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): In a study she conducted when she was a top executive at a Fortune 500 firm, she discovered that “people who were out of the box, pushing the edge, thinking in terms of the horizon…got lower [performance] ratings than the people who could show crazy execution on nonsense.” It’s a huge mistake – and a missed opportunity – for corporations, she says. You have to be able to evaluate managers and leaders on the criteria that matter most for each: “You’ve got to change that system. You can’t really want a system where you say, ‘I prefer you to drive nonsense…and that matters more than the person who puts their neck on the line.’”

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ManagingAmericans's comment, February 18, 2013 9:39 AM
Great insights Don. It is amazing to me how often we try and apply a preconceived box for a specific role and expect everyone to fit within that box.
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 19, 2013 4:34 AM

Well, interesting... I agree in a very limited degree... or rather not... I don't think that the B-W picture (either/or) is the adequate approach... I believe in the right proportion... In real big organizations, where the action radius of the leader is really broad and if, additionally, the strategic situation is on a very high level volatile might be that the leader-proportion is approaching the 100% but normally I don't think that Mintzberg's thoughts about the leadership/management (worth to read some of his books) has been so much the past...

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Turn Failures Into Stepping Stones: 5 Ways

Turn Failures Into Stepping Stones: 5 Ways | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Surely someone's told you to 'embrace failure' before. Here's what that means, actually, and how to do it.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Get back at it right away. There are good reasons why your second attempt at anything is always stronger than your first. And as long as something's worth trying, isn't it worth trying more than once?

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Richard Hart's curator insight, February 22, 2013 7:54 PM

Easy to say...not always easy to do -- especially when you're in a leadership position, and you feel the weight of responsibility on your shoulders.

 

The worst way to wear that responsibility is to take it so personally, to tie your identity to it so closely, that failure feels a threat to your very being. 

 

Someone spoke to me today of the "power of vulnerability". Having the courage to try, while acknowledging the potential for failure -- and then having the courage to pick yourself up again after the fall and try again -- must be a great example of what my friend was talking about.

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7 Common Energy and Time Wasters for Leaders

7 Common Energy and Time Wasters for Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Wasting time and energy may be one of my biggest pet peeves as a leader. Some days I leave work and feel I never got off the treadmill. It's physically and mentally draining. Does that ever happen to you?
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Living with broken structure – Let’s face reality. Over time, rules take on a life of their own. What was once created to improve structure actually begins to slow progress and waste valuable time. Change the rules…or even drop them… and you often free up valuable space for people to breathe and enjoy their work.

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[Infographic] Leadership Qualities | Leadership In Action

[Infographic] Leadership Qualities | Leadership In Action | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
We put together an infographic that describes some leadership qualities that can be developed and put in your own skills filing cabinet.

...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
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Ali Godding's curator insight, February 21, 2013 11:14 AM

There it is... the challenge of management on one page.  Being all of these things is a tall order.  Many are up for it, few really live it.... great infographic! 

Larry Davies's curator insight, February 21, 2013 2:52 PM

Love me some infographics.

Lauran Star's curator insight, February 21, 2013 4:00 PM

Leadership qualities.

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Leadership is About Doing the Impossible

Leadership is About Doing the Impossible | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The leaders who inspire me are people who accomplish the impossible.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, juandoming, Aki Puustinen
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Leaders find people who help them do the impossible.

 

Leaders rarely accomplish the impossible by themselves. They inspire the people around them to do what they thought was impossible. What may seem impossible for me is much less impossible when we work together.

People complement each other. Strong leaders seek out opportunities to work with people who help them become stronger, and learn from those opportunities.

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Sushil Pershad's curator insight, February 25, 2013 10:12 PM

These Are Great Leadership Qulities !!

Shah Nizamuddin M's curator insight, February 26, 2013 6:22 AM

My Belief....

Michael Binzer's curator insight, June 18, 2014 5:13 AM

Finding your own values can lead to new ground as a leader. For me it was a game changer

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Managers: Do you “ask” enough?

Managers: Do you “ask” enough? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How often do you ask your employees what they think?

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The key to good asking is believing your employees have information, knowledge, and ideas (that you don’t have) that can help you achieve your objectives. If a manager believes this, he or she will show it in tone, words, and behavior by asking and re-asking.

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5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think

5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
A look at the ways that the construction of language can have implications for the way we think, act and parse the world around us.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article):While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages,” like Chinese, use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. Using vast inventories of data and meticulous analysis, Chen found that huge economic differences accompany this linguistic discrepancy. Futureless language speakers are 30 percent more likely to report having saved in any given year than futured language speakers. (This amounts to 25 percent more savings by retirement, if income is held constant.) Chen’s explanation: When we speak about the future as more distinct from the present, it feels more distant — and we’re less motivated to save money now in favor of monetary comfort years down the line.

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Leadership and the Law of Replication

Leadership and the Law of Replication | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The “law of replication” says that like begets like. This applies especially to leadership. Like it or not, you will replicate yourself. Your followers will adopt your behaviors, habits, and mannerisms.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The bottom line is that you are the prototype for your followers. Your actions speak louder than words. You must pay careful attention to your own behavior. You are a living example of what it takes to go to the next level. You will replicate yourself.

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Thought for the Week - 02/18/13 - "What you do..."

Thought for the Week - 02/18/13 - "What you do..." | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

What you do has far greater impact than what you say.   — Stephen Covey

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Treat employees like adults, and you won't have leaks

Treat employees like adults, and you won't have leaks | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

With 1 billion user "endorsements" and counting, Jeff Weiner explains the secret behind LinkedIn's red-hot streak. (Hint: It has nothing to do with the 3,500 iPads he just gave employees.)

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article):  People have an insatiable curiosity, and if they're officially denied access to information, they're going to dig for it on their own. And if they find it, they'll become resentful and want to leak it. "That's when executive management says, well, clearly we can't trust our employees with this information. So, we're going to have to buckle down and release even less information." Employees become even more resentful, dig even deeper, and that, as Weiner explains, is when the witch hunt starts.

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Lincoln's lessons on leadership live on

Lincoln's lessons on leadership live on | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

As we celebrate Presidents Day, it is the perfect time to consider some of the leadership traits that made Abraham Lincoln one of the great presidents in American history. 

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Lincoln was extremely "self aware," as Kearns Goodwin says, meaning he understood that he had the potential to have serious mood shifts. Like all leaders, he could get angry, but Lincoln had the uncanny ability to understand that the way he communicated his anger toward those around him was critical to his success. When Lincoln was particularly angry he had a habit of writing a letter to the person he was angry with and then setting it aside. When Lincoln did verbally communicate his anger, he would quickly try to resolve the situation, refusing to allow unresolved conflict to fester.

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The Best Leaders Know Self Esteem is Scarce

The Best Leaders Know Self Esteem is Scarce | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Economics teaches us that if something is scarce, it is more valuable. And while self-esteem might be scarce in your workplace, it doesn’t have to be.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): See it Yourself.  When people’s self-esteem isn’t at healthy levels, it is in part because they don’t see themselves as capable or able to achieve at higher levels.   Before you can help them see something new in themselves, you must see it in them.

 

Help Them See It.  Let people know you believe in them.  Show them examples of success that they don’t see, are downplaying, or are denying.  Your belief can begin to be transferred to them when you help them see what you see.

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Washington's Lessons: It’s Never to Early to Choose to Lead

Washington's Lessons: It’s Never to Early to Choose to Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

GREAT LEADERSHIP doesn’t just happen. Great leaders are revealed in extraordinary circumstances, but they are made long before. A person’s quality of leadership radiates from their character. Consequently, it’s never too early to begin your leadership development.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): It is the mindset of a leader to work on themselves harder than they work on others. A leader’s first responsibility is governing themselves. Historian Gordon Wood has written, “Washington became a great man and was acclaimed as a classical hero because of the way he conducted himself during times of temptation. It was his moral character that set him off from other men.” 

Leadership is embodied in the way you look at the world and respond to it. It’s never too early to choose to lead.

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