Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Weird Leadership

Weird Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

People who change things become fanatics first. I became obsessed with developing leadership a few years ago. Many friends thought I was weird. Some friends don’t hang with me anymore. I’m more committed to developing leadership than anyone around me.

 

Radical leaders create radical change.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): People who change things look weird to the rest of us but they aren’t trying to look weird.

 

Radical dedication to mission makes leaders weird
to those who don’t share their mission.

 

Additionally, naysayers, sluggards, and drifters believe leaders who are dedicated to radical change are unbalanced, misguided; perhaps even delusional.

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Gust MEES's comment, April 8, 2013 10:08 AM
Hi, I have to add something: Some designated (by others) radical leaders don't want maybe to be leaders & just giving a kick to others to wake up & take themselves the lead! An other possibility to consider also!
Ana Tapia's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:53 PM

What the solution? Ask participation, ask, answer, include...Its enough?

What about resistence...people need time and attention to their specific immunity to change , according RObert Kegan an Lisa Laskow Lahey.

 

Its not enough motivation or desire, we neeed to adress the coletive mindsets made it by "strong belifs" . 

 

Is why change could be seeen as a mystery ...almost impossible.

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Seven Crucial Leadership Conversations Critical to Future Business Success

Seven Crucial Leadership Conversations Critical to Future Business Success | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

"Like canaries in a coal mine, this year’s human capital trends should be viewed as leading indicators of emerging threats and strategic opportunities."


Via Andrew Spence, David Hain
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Andrew Spence's curator insight, April 6, 2013 1:41 AM

" In 2013, leaders are tasked with meeting high expectations for performance and talent, despite dramatic shifts in technology, globalization, demographics and regulation."

Interesting report from Deloitte, with 7 Human Capital Trends for 2013.

Starting with "Thinking like an economist"......

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 2:39 PM

I am not sure I want to think like an economist, but I do want to debunk the superman myth. I am OK with saying: "I don't know." We need to in this complex world.

Andrew Spence's comment, April 9, 2013 3:55 AM
Thanks for sharing this. Ivon - good point about being comfortable saying "I don't know" with some of these complex issues. I am not sure HR should think like an economist all the time, but one day a week might help!
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Modern Etiquette: The Power of Referrals

Modern Etiquette: The Power of Referrals | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Attention job seekers! One of the best ways to get your foot in the door for a job interview is to get a job referral, or two.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): And it doesn't stop there: according to StartWire.com, one of the web's top sites for job searching, "Referrals are the #1 source of hires in corporate America today. And, recent research shows that 'referral' hires not only stay in their jobs longer but that they perform better over the long term."

 

If you're new at asking for a referral, or if you're unsure if you're using the correct approach, here are a few tips to keep in mind.

 

Use your mouse.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 2, 2013 1:43 PM

Referrals are gold for both HR and job seekers. The key is to build a relaible network of colleagues who really know your abilities. The person who makes a great referral also benefits by brining talent to their company. When it works right, everyone wins. 

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Top 10 Differences Between Managers and Leaders

Top 10 Differences Between Managers and Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

From Daniel Watson: This excellent short video, offers ten clear differentiators between leaders and managers, and suggests that businesses require both leadership and management to be successful.

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David Schultz's curator insight, April 3, 2013 3:33 PM

I like the simplicity of this video, and I don't disagree with anything they say fundamentally.  In fact I think they are right on the mark with the exception of their use of the word "follower."  They say that Leaders produce followers, but I believe leaders produce leaders.  They may be front line employees who do not lead anyone else, but instead of following they lead out in their sphere of responsibilities.

 

So other than a little nuance in semantics this is a great video.

Socius Ars's curator insight, April 10, 2013 12:07 PM

add your insight...

 

 
Socius Ars's curator insight, April 11, 2013 5:38 PM

add your insight...

 

 
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Leadership is Reading Between the Lines

Leadership is Reading Between the Lines | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Lines are important to how they see themselves, other people, and the world around them. They know where to draw the lines. The always color inside the lines. They never step out of line. They may enjoy being at the front of the line.


Via David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): eadership is when what is between our lines connects with what is between the lines of the people around us.

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12 Ways to Be the Leader Everyone Wants to Work For - Forbes

12 Ways to Be the Leader Everyone Wants to Work For - Forbes | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It’s not easy being a manager these days.

Via AlGonzalezinfo
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Personal Attention: You know the drill: Give the new hire a laptop and tell him to go “make it happen.” And it often fails. To become a great leader, you must make your reports’ success into your personal mission. The best leaders are always out talking to their people. They take the time to coach and train, knowing neglect only reinforces bad habits, stagnation, and disengagement. They provide regular feedback on performance, knowing the best people crave candidness and loathe sugarcoating. Most important, these leaders pay attention. They care about their people and stay in touch on a personal level, knowing their inner lives influence their success as much as any guidance. That’s how they know when to push and when to pull back. Bottom line: The best leaders make their reports feel valued – or inspire them do those things that’ll ultimately make them feel better (and make your organization run better).

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, April 2, 2013 6:52 AM

Personal Attention: You know the drill: Give the new hire a laptop and tell him to go “make it happen.” And it often fails.


To become a great leader, you must make your reports’ success into your personal mission. The best leaders are always out talking to their people. They take the time to coach and train, knowing neglect only reinforces bad habits, stagnation, and disengagement.


They provide regular feedback on performance, knowing the best people crave candidness and loathe sugarcoating.


Most important, these leaders pay attention.


They care about their people and stay in touch on a personal level, knowing their inner lives influence their success as much as any guidance. That’s how they know when to push and when to pull back. Bottom line: The best leaders make their reports feel valued – or inspire them do those things that’ll ultimately make them feel better (and make your organization run better).

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Leaders’ Decision-Making: A Blended Approach

Leaders’ Decision-Making: A Blended Approach | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Mature decision-making employs the best of two approaches—rational and intuitive. 


Via David Hain, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Perfect decisions generally require perfect humans, which are in short supply. So mature decision-making employs the best of both approaches—rational and intuitive—recognizing the dangers of over-reliance on either, and blending the two.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 28, 2013 6:18 AM

Good article!  For those interested in this subject I can't recommend anything more highly than readin "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman.

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Break Out of the Leadership Comfort Zone

Break Out of the Leadership Comfort Zone | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Stuck in a rut, leaders are challenged to inspire their team to new levels of success. Here are six actions to take today to break out of the leadership comfort zone.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Risk can be a scary word when we’re deeply entrenched in the comfort of the status quo.  As a leader, why should you foster innovation if you and your organization are successful today?  There are 100 companies right behind you and ready to undercut you on price for similar products and services.  Clients eyes glaze over after a while when the only differentiator is price.  Break out of the comfort zone and start with doing something different, not just making incremental improvements to today’s processes and products.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 27, 2013 5:53 AM

(From the article): Risk can be a scary word when we’re deeply entrenched in the comfort of the status quo.  As a leader, why should you foster innovation if you and your organization are successful today?  There are 100 companies right behind you and ready to undercut you on price for similar products and services.  Clients eyes glaze over after a while when the only differentiator is price.  Break out of the comfort zone and start with doing something different, not just making incremental improvements to today’s processes and products.

David Hain's curator insight, March 27, 2013 6:55 AM

No gain without pain - trite but true!

John Michel's curator insight, March 27, 2013 7:24 AM

Good news! You don’t need to be radical and move to the other side of the world to break out of your leadership comfort zone and move beyond the status quo.

//////////

John Michel, experienced leader, humanitarian, visioneer, and renown status quo buster, is the author of the ground breaking book, Mediocre Me: How Saying No to the Status Quo will Propel you from Ordinary to Extraordinary. Check out his blog at www.MediocreMe.com or drop him a note at johnmichel@MediocreMe.com


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Thinking about How I Think

Thinking about How I Think | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

There was a time – when I was oh so young — when I might have gone and talked about various models that could help them with change management or strategy development, but in these chaotic times I have no prescriptions or magic bullets to offer.

 

So I prepared a brief document that focused first on my perspective, attitudes, and mindset about transformational change.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): 4. Change is personal. Organizations don’t change; people do. And for an organization to change, the people within it have to change together. Any transformation venture must understand the personal nature of transformation. Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) is a theory “based on the belief that when people get together in a group, there are three main interpersonal needs they are looking to obtain – affection/openness, control and inclusion” (Wikipedia). I add to this two more: the need to add value/be valued and the need for clear purpose.

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christine koehler's comment, March 29, 2013 7:25 AM
Yes, it's a good tool, that can be integrated to many others and that enable to ask powerful questions.
Tom Hood's curator insight, March 29, 2013 8:25 AM

Some great insights in this article for me, reaffirmations and reinforcement of principles around leading change and innovation.

 

Change is about people, not organizations or systems. Organizations are really about People. I use the term Return on People.

 

Transformation is about creation and destruction. I say transformation is creating what isn't rather than improving what is.

 

Paradox and the ability to hold onto completely opposite ideas (also from Jim Collins and the power of AND versus OR).

 

What do you think?

Orianne Corman's comment, April 3, 2013 5:43 AM
Hello Tom, for me it's very interesting to connect opposite ideas, it's the soil of creativity.
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8 Secrets to Eliminating Negativity

8 Secrets to Eliminating Negativity | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

One bad experience outweighs one good. A gallon of bad weighs more than a gallon of good.

 

Setbacks nag; success whispers.


You overemphasize what went wrong and minimize what went right. Down is easier than up.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The pursuit of excellence is fueled by positive environments. Positive environments aren’t accidents, leaders build them.

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Better Leadership Through Social Media

Better Leadership Through  Social Media | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Executives should look at specific social media as a personal toolbox for improving their practice of leadership.

Via ThinDifference
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The solution is to stop looking at social media as another platform you have to learn—yet another responsibility—and start seeing it for what it can be instead: a personal toolbox for improving your practice of leadership.

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ThinDifference's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:34 AM

Simple answer is "yes" but this article highlights some great ideas to use.

donhornsby's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:18 AM

The article has some great ideas to implement as leaders on social media.

Robin Martin's curator insight, March 30, 2013 10:25 AM

Keeping up with what's going on around them should definitely be a plus for any leader...convincing them to do this may be easier said than done!  

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The Secret and Power of Listening

The Secret and Power of Listening | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leaders often rise to leadership because they are great talkers. Now it’s in the way.

 

You can’t connect, communicate or influence without listening. Bad bosses talk. Successful leaders listen.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Forget about advanced listening skills. Don’t jump to active, critical, or appreciative listening.

 

Open your ears by closing your mouth.

 

Look in their eyes and stop flapping your tongue. Leaders are listeners.

Jumping from no listening to advanced listening is like using a dragster for driving lessons. You’ll crash and burn. In addition, going from poor listening to active listening creates paranoia in those around you. “What’s going on?”

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Train Your Brain to Overcome Fear

Train Your Brain to Overcome Fear | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You don't have to be a natural risk-taker in order to succeed, and learning how fear works can empower you to overcome it.

Three tips to help you get over your fears and take bigger risks.


Via The People Development Network
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Risk-takers will be more likely to encourage you to take chances, and they will also be living examples of what it takes to risk and fail and risk again. "If you look at the biography of a famous person, it all depends on where in the biography you stop," Mehta says. "Success comes by way of many, many failures."


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Mary Meduna, PhD's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:21 AM

I've got a few scars from risks that didn't work out as I originally hoped.  But I'd rather be a risk taker than play is safe all the time.  How about you? #energizedleader

John Michel's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:25 PM

Entrepreneurs have to take big risks in order to succeed, but even well-known leaders are often terrified to leap. In one famous example, fear of failure almost kept Kevin Rose from starting Digg, the enormously successful social news site that made him a multi-millionaire.Over time, he learned to trust his gut by taking the initiative to learn sides of the business that were unfamiliar or scary at first.
/////////////

John Michel, experienced leader, humanitarian, visioneer, and renown status quo buster, is the author of the ground breaking book, Mediocre Me: How Saying No to the Status Quo will Propel you from Ordinary to Extraordinary. Check out his blog at www.MediocreMe.com or drop him a note at johnmichel@MediocreMe.com

Gauthier de Pierpont's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:35 AM

Peur mode d'emploi pour entrepreneur (de vie, de projet, de business...)

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Avoiding Bad Advice From Your Colleagues

Avoiding Bad Advice From Your Colleagues | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Tips on how to ignore, reject, or only pretend to follow terrible guidance. Not all advice is good. Some is outdated, out of context, impractical, even malicious.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Seek out a champion. The best antidote to bad advice is a trustworthy, decent, supportive, shrewd, and politically powerful mentor. Ideally, your dissertation adviser or your tenure-track mentor would not only give good advice but intervene or deflect the bad variety. When someone else offers a suggestion that seems to be a waste of your time or energy, your champion should be someone who will say, "Don't worry; I'll handle it," and then does.

 

That said, the best advisers, while defending their protégés, don't become ersatz helicopter parents. Years ago, a senior scholar I very much respected told me to remember, when dealing with my own doctoral students, that "you can't and shouldn't drag them across the finish line."

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John Michel's curator insight, April 7, 2013 10:53 AM

Don't get caught up in the pressure or drama of a moment. The key to making smart decisions about whether a piece of advice is useful or not is to step back and make a dispassionate cost-benefit analysis, in consultation with people you trust.

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Life Goals: Plan It... Live It... Achieve It.

Life Goals: Plan It... Live It... Achieve It. | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
A life goal is a main purpose or objective – the reason you do all that day-to-day stuff.  It's like building a compass that gives focus, direction

Via AlGonzalezinfo
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If someone woke you up at 3 o’clock in the morning, out of a deep sleep, and asked:What is the one thing, the biggest thing, you want to accomplish in life? What would you say? What would be the first thing that comes to mind – your automatic response? That’s your primary life goal.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, April 4, 2013 9:30 AM

I always appreciate articles by Ron Whitaker, this one especially. 

 

From the article:

 

Take a minute, right now, to download and print the About Leaders goal setting worksheet. Get a pencil with a nice eraser to make editing easier and write down a goal that is extremely important to you.

 

Here are some questions to use when you are mapping out your goal.  Have fun with this and don’t get hung up on whether you think your goal is possible or not.

 

~What is the most important goal you want to accomplish, your life goal?

~What are the most important things in your life right now? Do they fit with your life goal?

~What are the obstacles to achieving your life goal? Money, time, work, responsibilities, etc.

~How can you overcome any obstacles?

~If you feel you’re off track, how will you get back on track?

David Hain's curator insight, April 4, 2013 11:10 AM

So many people have 'wish lists' - I campletely agree about writing goals down. Another tip is to share them out loud with someone else - then you have made a commitment that isn't so easy to rationalise away in the mirror...

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7 Secrets to Leading Through Turbulence

7 Secrets to Leading Through Turbulence | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leaders matter most during storms.

donhornsby's insight:

Turbulent times and threatening circumstances call for strong leadership. People depend on you. Challenging times make or break you and those around you. Rise up.

 

Your response impacts their response.

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Turn Your Company Culture From “I” to “We”

Turn Your Company Culture From “I” to “We” | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Most leaders today believe in a “we” culture. They have read the books on building teams and work to implement the advice. Then they are stymied when the teamwork doesn’t happen or falls apart.

 

Take these additional steps to turn your company culture from “I” to “We.”


Via Richard Andrews
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): There is very little to stop you from creating a “we” culture if your actions and the organization’s policies support true teamwork. Inspire and model how to be a buoy in a “we” culture of service excellence. Ask the team for suggestions on how to strengthen the company culture. Involve them and they will build a “we” culture of teamwork!

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3 Biggest Excuses of Wanna-Be Leaders

3 Biggest Excuses of Wanna-Be Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It's time to stop making a excuses. If you want to be a leader, there's nothing holding you back.

Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): I need someone's permission. This excuse comes in many varieties. Sometimes it's professional ("I don't have the letters after my name that  my peer group have, so they won't respect my leadership"); sometimes it's organizational ("My boss  / my job description / my daily activities aren't explicit about me being a leader, so I'll look presumptuous if I start"), and sometimes it's personal ("I'm only [some age] / I've never [accomplished some goal] / I didn't [go to some school / get some degree]").

Look, to get started as a leader, the only person you need permission from is you. 

 

Yes, after you've begun to lead, you will need other people's permission, in the form of them accepting your leadership. And maybe you'll suck at it and your leadership career will be short-lived. But you'll never know until you start, and the only person who can fire the starting gun on your leadership is...you.

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Emotional intelligence is a workplace concept that should be taken seriously

Emotional intelligence is a workplace concept that should be taken seriously | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

If everyone was just like me, the entire office would be made of Belgian chocolate and we'd watch movies all day, stopping only occasionally to nibble on the walls.

 

Unfortunately, my workplace

 is like everyone else's: made of bland, inedible materials and filled with people who have different tastes, personalities and emotions.


Via Barbara Kerr
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Somewhere along the line we decided the way we interact in a work environment should be quite different than the way we interact with friends and family. That's as it should be, up to a point. But it overlooks the fact that we don't become robots when we walk through the office door.

We remain human beings throughout the day. Fleshy, warm-blooded, emotional.

 

Appreciate that. And hope that someday we can all work in office buildings made of rich Belgian chocolate — which would help smooth out everyone's emotions.

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Barbara Kerr's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:20 AM

"For too long, emotions have been unwelcome at work. We had a job to do, darn it, and we weren't going to let silly things like feelings get in the way. So we stifled tears, anger (sometimes) and even passion, lest we risk seeming unhinged."

Patricia Clason's curator insight, March 28, 2013 9:21 AM

Handling emotions in a healthy way in the workplace creates more engaged employees, more satisfied and healthier employees. It's a win for everyone and an idea whose time has come. The way our work world has shifted now means many people spend more time in a week with their fellow workers than their family members. 

 

Consider the emotional culture of your organization. What needs to change for it to be healthier? more emotionally intelligent?

God Is.'s curator insight, March 29, 2013 10:51 AM

To me, this is a Utopic article... It really is...

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In the Company of Givers and Takers

In the Company of Givers and Takers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Every day, employees make decisions about whether to act like givers or like takers. When they act like givers, they contribute to others without seeking anything in return. They might offer assistance, share knowledge, or make valuable introductions. When they act like takers, they try to get other people to serve their ends while carefully guarding their own expertise and time.

 

Organizations have a strong interest in fostering giving behavior.


Via David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Part of the solution must involve targeting the takers in the organization—providing incentives for them to collaborate and establishing repercussions for refusing reasonable requests. But even more important, my research suggests, is helping the givers act on their generous impulses more productively. The key is for employees to gain a more nuanced understanding of what generosity is and is not. Givers are better positioned to succeed when they distinguish generosity from three other attributes—timidity, availability, and empathy—that tend to travel with it.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 28, 2013 3:09 AM

In my experience you tend to get bak what you give.  So this is a strategy for abundance.

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Social influencers: Digital marketing's most overlooked and misused resource [infographic]

Social influencers: Digital marketing's most overlooked and misused resource [infographic] | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Digital marketing budgets are rising, yet many companies aren't taking advantage of the edge social influencers have on the market. Who or what is a social influencer and what can you do to connect...

Via Beth Kanter
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Robin Martin's comment, March 30, 2013 10:19 AM
In my opinion, this should be a "no-brainer" to businesses and marketers...but I've seen first-hand that "selling" social media, influence marketing, etc. can be like pulling teeth! I hear ya!
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How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team

How Criticizing in Private Undermines Your Team | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

If you're like most leaders, you believe in the adage "praise in public and criticize in private." So when a team member does something that negatively affects the team, you usually talk to the team member in private. But this can be a dangerous adage to follow because it significantly reduces accountability, the quality of team decisions, and your team's ability to manage itself.


Via Richard Andrews, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Leadership isn't about being comfortable; it's about being effective, even when you're uncomfortable. Smart leaders address ineffective team member behavior in the team setting when it occurs, or when the behavior affects the team. In the team: that's where the information, solution, and accountability are.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 27, 2013 4:44 AM

Great teams have developed great norms.  Bringingthe best from each other is one.  Thisis a great way to do that...

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Best Advice: What I Learned From Jack Welch Hanging Up on Me

Best Advice: What I Learned From Jack Welch Hanging Up on Me | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

One afternoon over ten years ago, I was talking on the phone to my boss, former GE Chairman and CEO Jack Welch, when the line went dead. I called his assistant Rosanne Badowski to say we had been disconnected.


“No you weren’t,” she said. “Jack hung up on you.”


Via AlGonzalezinfo
donhornsby's insight:

Do you take time to get to know others - before you launch in?

 

 

(From the article): Imagine my surprise when he called me into his office that day and admonished me for beingtoo efficient. My zeal to do everything on my to-do list—along with my reserved, even shy nature—made me come across as abrupt and cold. I started every meeting by jumping right in and left with every action under control.

 

"You have to wallow in it," he said. "Take time to get to know people. Understand where they are coming from, what is important to them. Make sure they are with you."

 

At best, my colleagues didn't know what to make of me—and I certainly didn't give them time to find out.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:35 AM

Love this article as it deals with something many managers struggle with, interupting others. It does not matter if we had to do it in the past, truth is listening is superior and we have to learn how to do it.

 

From the article:

 

One afternoon over ten years ago, I was talking on the phone to my boss, former GE Chairman and CEO Jack Welch, when the line went dead. I called his assistant Rosanne Badowski to say we had been disconnected.


“No you weren’t,” she said. “Jack hung up on you.”

"Huh?"


"He wants you to know that's what it's like to be in a meeting with you, "

Rosanne said.

 

"You're too abrupt."


 

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8 Essential Parts to a Business (And How They Work Together)

8 Essential Parts to a Business (And How They Work Together) | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
In order to build the most successful small business in the world, you must understand that a small business is a system in which all parts contribute to the success or failure of the whole.

Via Scott Span, MSOD
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Each of these parts must collaborate with the other parts to form a whole. Unless they fit together in a collaborative, highly systematic way, your business will be in chaos. And when it comes to building the most successful small business in the world, chaos simply will not do. That business--the successful one--must grow out of order.

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How to Lead From the Middle

How to Lead From the Middle | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
You may think a good leader needs to be out in front. Not always.

Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): This also recalls a reasoning I read in the book The Art of Possibility by Ben Zander, conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra. He reminds us all that a conductor plays no instrument, but needs to get every other member of the orchestra to play perfectly on tune and in tempo to make beautiful music.

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