Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Inside Starbucks's $35 Million Mission To Make Brand Evangelists Of Its Front-Line Workers

Inside Starbucks's $35 Million Mission To Make Brand Evangelists Of Its Front-Line Workers | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“It makes me proud,” declares Fawnya Ramirez, a Starbucks store manager from San Mateo, Calif.

 

To Starbucks, baristas are not just baristas--they are ambassadors of brand, merchants of romance, disciples of delight. The company recently invested millions in a "Leadership Lab" designed to drill that message in for 9,600 store managers. So did it work?

“It makes me proud,” declares Fawnya Ramirez, a Starbucks store manager from San Mateo, Calif. We’re standing in a 400,000-square-foot conference center in Houston that currently feels more like a Starbucks theme park.

 

Nearby, amid 5,000 live coffee trees, are photos of smiling farmers along with information about Starbucks’s ethical sourcing initiatives. Ramirez’s voice suddenly cracks, and she breaks into tears. “There’s just so much good that goes into a little bag of coffee,” she says, wiping off her cheek.

 

She still has about 300,000 square feet and 20 exhibits to go in what Starbucks calls its “Leadership Lab,” a high-gloss, two-hour, theatrical experience that was the highlight of the company's recent conference for about 9,600 Starbucks managers, each of whom, the company notes, "essentially run $1 million+ small businesses."

 

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Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

In outcomes-based learning environments, we generally see three elements in play: 1) learning objectives or targets are created from given standards; 2) instruction of some kind is given; and then 3) learning results are assessed. These assessments offer data to inform the revision of further planned instruction. Rinse and repeat.

 

But lost in this clinical sequence are the Habits of Mind that (often predictably) lead to success or failure in the mastery of given standards. In fact, it is not in the standards or assessments, but rather these personal habits where success or failure -- in academic terms -- actually begin.

Below are all 16 Habits of Mind, each with a tip, strategy or resource to understand and begin implementation in your classroom.

 

The habits themselves aren't new at all, and significant work has already been done in the areas of these "thinking habits." However, in a 21st century learning environment -- one often inundated with information, stimulation and connectivity -- there may be a newfound context for their application.

 

And a renewed urgency for their integration.


Via Nik Peachey, Aki Puustinen
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If You're Too Busy to Meditate, Read This

If You're Too Busy to Meditate, Read This | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Doing nothing for 20 minutes a day actually increases your productivity.

 

People say the hardest part about meditating is finding the time to meditate. This makes sense: who these days has time to do nothing? It's hard to justify.

 

Meditation brings many benefits: It refreshes us, helps us settle into what's happening now, makes us wiser and gentler, helps us cope in a world that overloads us with information and communication, and more. But if you're still looking for a business case to justify spending time meditating, try this one: Meditation makes you more productive.

 

How? By increasing your capacity to resist distracting urges.

 

Research shows that an ability to resist urges will improve your relationships, increase your dependability, and raise your performance. If you can resist your urges, you can make better, more thoughtful decisions. You can be more intentional about what you say and how you say it.

 

You can think about the outcome of your actions before following through on them.

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6 Reasons Core Values Matter

6 Reasons Core Values Matter | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Core values–or whatever you want to call them–are a BFD. Some folks might argue that they’re not that important, but I’d suggest they rethink that position because whether they think they’re important or not, core values are a big deal.

 

Here’s why they’re a big deal:

 

1. They encourage a sense of belonging.Humans are wired to want and need a sense of belonging, so why wouldn’t we want to createcommunities in our workplaces that provide the sort of positive, meaningful belonging that we’re designed to desire as human beings?

 

2. They promote loyalty. They’re like a stake in the ground, so to speak. The more certain sorts of values are internalized by the folks at an organization, the more likely people are to develop a sense of loyalty to the organization and those values.

 

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7 Stupid Thinking Errors You Probably Make

7 Stupid Thinking Errors You Probably Make | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The brain isn’t a flawless piece of machinery. Although it is powerful and comes in an easy to carry container, it has it’s weaknesses. A field in psychology which studies these errors, known as biases.

 

The brain isn’t a flawless piece of machinery. Although it is powerful and comes in an easy to carry container, it has it’s weaknesses. A field in psychology which studies these errors, known as biases. Although you can’t upgrade your mental hardware, noticing these biases can clue you into possible mistakes.

How Bias Hurts You


If you were in a canoe, you’d probably want to know about any holes in the boat before you start paddling. Biases can be holes in your reasoning abilities and they can impair your decision making.

 

Simply noticing these holes isn’t enough; a canoe will fill with water whether you are aware of a hole or not. But by being aware of the holes you can devise methods to patch them up. The entire domain of the scientific method has largely been an effort to overcome the natural inclination towards bias in reasoning.

 

Biases hurt you in a number of areas:...

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Successful People are Enthusiastic!

Successful People are Enthusiastic! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Do we absolutely have to be enthusiastic to be successful?

 

Do we absolutely have to be enthusiastic to be successful? Probably not, we can likely find cases where a somewhat unenthusiastic person has become a success. What would be much more difficult to find is an enthusiastic person who is not a success.

 

Dale Carnegie said that “enthusiasm is the little recognized secret to success.” I believe that statement is as true today as it was when he made it 75 years ago. It is true for any profession but maybe there is a bit more truth in it where salespeople are concerned.

 

Think about it, you’re trying to convince a customer that your product is best, so much so that it is worth paying a premium to own. That is hard enough as it is, it becomes almost impossible when we have the enthusiasm of an autopsy subject. How can your customer become excited about what we have to offer when you appear not to be? Would you buy from someone just going through the motions?

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There Is No Magic Pill For Great Leadership

There Is No Magic Pill For Great Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

I've been interviewing a number of executives for my new book, The Magnetic Workplace (Nicholas Brealey, 2013) and so far my findings have been rather interesting.

 

There is no magic pill for great leadership. Yet many organizations believe they can solve problems by handing someone a book (even if it's authored by me) or sending them to a one-day management training program at the local Holiday Inn. The results by themselves are usually disappointing.

 

Here's how great leadership is created:...


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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5 Keys to Building Strong Relationships in Any Sphere of Life

5 Keys to Building Strong Relationships in Any Sphere of Life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Having healthy relationships means so much for every area of our life.

 

If there is one thing that psychological research and personal experience will reveal to each and every one of us, it’s the positive impact relationships have on our happiness, level of success, and overall well-being.

 

Having healthy relationships means so much for every area of our life.

 

Relationships offer us joy, love, and support in times of need. They also help us expand our aspirations and level of achievement through support, knowledge, and connections. In general, relationships can help us to grow and become better people.

 

So, whether your focus is on intimate and loving relationships, or more professional business relationships, there are certain traits that will make any relationship more meaningful and long-lasting.

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Lee Wise's curator insight, October 26, 2013 9:38 PM

Drastically "new?"  No.  But worth the review?  Absolutely!  Enjoy a Beautiful Moment In Time... or two :) 

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How to Foster a Feedback-Friendly Company

How to Foster a Feedback-Friendly Company | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
To create an open culture, you want to make feedback both constructive and commonplace. Here’s how: 

 

Imagine this scenario: One of the managers at your company steamrolls everyone else in meetings. No one wants to confront him, so they stew during the meeting and complain at the water coolers afterward. For your business, that’s wasted time and toxic negativity. Instead, encourage honest feedback and you’ll have a happier, moreproductive workplace.

 

"We waste a huge amount of time and energy tiptoeing around difficult situations," says Katherine Klein, a professor of management at Wharton business school at the University of Pennsylvania. That silence breeds gossip, obsessive thoughts, and generally disgruntled workers.

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100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes

100 Best Quotes on Leadership - Forbes | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

A great quote can provide personal inspiration and can be used to educate others. Below are my top 100 leadership quotes of all time. (Have a favorite quote that didn't make my list? Share it out in the comments section below!


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Gary Morrison
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3 Reasons "Balance" Has Become A Dirty Word At Work

3 Reasons "Balance" Has Become A Dirty Word At Work | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Recently, a skeptical senior leader asked me to explain the business case for why organizations need to take a more coordinated, strategic approach to work flexibility.

 

When Millennials say they want “balance,” they don’t mean work less. They mean work differently and more flexibly. There’s a big difference. My experience is that most Millennials are willing to work very hard when required; however, they might want to work from home or come into the office earlier or later then traditional hours. The problem is that outdated language limits their ability to describe accurately what they are trying to achieve.


Via Anne Egros
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Key to career success is confidence, not talent

Key to career success is confidence, not talent | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The secret to career success is not talent, hard work or education, but sheer, unashamed confidence, a study has suggested.

 

Although workers with big egos will often perform poorly and make more mistakes, their colleagues consistently fail to spot their errors and continue to believed they are “terrific” or “beloved”.

 

Their personality means they are often promoted over those who are more competent, as colleagues mistake their confidence for talent.

 

A study of more than 500 students, academics and workers, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, showed that those who appeared more confident achieved a higher social status than their peers.

 

Within a work environment, higher-status individuals tended to be more admired, listened to, and had more sway over group decisions.

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9 Reasons He’s a Better Leader Than I Am

9 Reasons He’s a Better Leader Than I Am | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

It’s always good to surround yourself with people who challenge you to get better. My friend is one of those people.

 

You know how there are some people who are just really freaking good at certain aspects of their work? We all have strengths, sure; but some folks go a step further in one or two areas, right? It’s their sweet spot. Their thing. And when they’re doing that thing, it’s really a thing of beauty to watch.

 

You likely wouldn’t recognize his name right away, but he’s probably the best developer of people, the best coach, the best whatever-you-want-to-call-it I’ve ever seen firsthand. He’s simply way better at coaching than I am, which is great because I learn a lot from him and am better off for it. How he does what he does makes me want to keep pushing myselfto get better at it.

 

I want to be able to coach my team like I see him coach his. (And I’m not gonna lie–there are times he’s so good at it that it makes me want to punch him in the ear. Or maybe the tooth. But that’s what friends are for, right?)

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Your Employees are Engaged...REALLY?

Your Employees are Engaged...REALLY? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Here are my top 5 questions which help construct the WHYS of employee engagement for leaders.

 

When companies like the one I visited recently tell me their workplace culture and trendy furniture builds employee engagement, I try to make them see that they’re focusing on the wrong part of the equation. They’re focusing on what, not why. What can tell you a lot about a company, but it’s why that tells you it’s a good company to work with. I consult with these organizations and hiring leaders to consider the whys of employee engagement.

 

Here are my top 5 questions which help construct the WHYS of employee engagement for leaders.


Via Richard Andrews
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Bruner Corporation » Promoting a Culture of Servant Leadership

Bruner Corporation » Promoting a Culture of Servant Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Servant Leadership is not just a practice – it’s a culture of leading by example, which can be applied to both personal and professional lives.

 

By embracing the role of a Servant Leader, you are choosing to uphold and embody the Seven Pillars of Servant Leadership.

 

You seek lasting change, create authentic relationships, persevere with a non-anxious presence, invest in motivated people, and focus less on doing things the “right” way and more on doing what is right.


Via AlGonzalezinfo
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High Performer or High Potential

High Performer or High Potential | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
All high performers are not high potentials.

 

All leaders always keep watch for high performers they can move into greater responsibilities.

 

You’re a lousy leader who may succeed in the short-term but fail in the end, if you don’t.

 

Real leader want to make more leaders.


Seduction:


Passion to develop great teams seduces leaders into hoping high performers are high potentials. But…

 

All high performers are not high potentials.


They’re just great at their jobs. Moving them into management or leadership is disastrous.

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Will They Tell You You're Naked?

Will They Tell You You're Naked? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Modern leaders can learn some unexpected lessons from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale.

Via Roger Francis
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Thiel Fellowship: Is It Worthwhile?

Thiel Fellowship: Is It Worthwhile? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The Thiel Fellowship is looking for its next batch of 24 college students to pay $100,000 to drop out of college. But has the model been a success?

 

Last year, Peter Thiel decided it was about time someone hacked what he considered America's deeply flawed educational system.

 

The PayPal founder and Facebook investor launched the Thiel Fellowship, which offered $100,000 grants to 24 students ages 20 and younger to drop out of school and pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions. This week, Thiel announced a call for new submissions.

 

Although the Fellowship has certainly attracted a huge amount of press, including these stories from Inc., the program is not merely just a publicity stunt. In an interview with National Review last year, Thiel explained his logic behind the fellowship.

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6 Ways Successful Leaders Think

6 Ways Successful Leaders Think | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Right thinking makes hard work effective.

 

Only fools plan to fail. Leaders always plan to succeed.

 

"Working on plans is working to anticipate and nullify reasons for failure."

 

But, failure happens in spite of plans. There’s more to success than hard work.

 

"The uncomfortable truth is sincere, smart,hardworking people fail all the time."

 

Success demands hard work and right thinking.

 

"Learning from failure helps you think right."

 

Lessons from failure:...

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If You’re Not Developing… You’re Not Leading!

If You’re Not Developing… You’re Not Leading! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leadership Development is one of those terms that people throw around with ease, often times without embracing the true essence of what it’s all about. The reality is that leadership development is one of the ultimate callings of leadership. Without leadership development, there cannot be the reproduction of more leaders.  


Without the reproduction of more leaders, the evolution of leadership begins to cease.


The problem with leadership development is the fact that it takes time, creativity, patience, thoughtfulness and too many other descriptive words for a single blog post.


Leadership development requires a leader to focus on the success of those they lead, while simultaneously focusing on the vision of the organization.  Those things do happen simultaneously and are not mutually exclusive.

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What Makes a Leader?

What Makes a Leader? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The Idea in Brief What distinguishes great leaders from merely good ones? It isn’t IQ or technical skills, says Daniel Goleman.

 

Every businessperson knows a story about a highly intelligent, highly skilled executive who was promoted into a leadership position only to fail at the job. And they also know a story about someone with solid—but not extraordinary—intellectual abilities and technical skills who was promoted into a similar position and then soared.

 

Such anecdotes support the widespread belief that identifying individuals with the “right stuff” to be leaders is more art than science. After all, the personal styles of superb leaders vary: Some leaders are subdued and analytical; others shout their manifestos from the mountaintops. And just as important, different situations call for different types of leadership. Most mergers need a sensitive negotiator at the helm, whereas many turnarounds require a more forceful authority.

 

I have found, however, that the most effective leaders are alike in one crucial way: They all have a high degree of what has come to be known as emotional intelligence. It’s not that IQ and technical skills are irrelevant. They do matter, but mainly as “threshold capabilities”; that is, they are the entry-level requirements for executive positions. But my research, along with other recent studies, clearly shows that emotional intelligence is the sine qua non of leadership. Without it, a person can have the best training in the world, an incisive, analytical mind, and an endless supply of smart ideas, but he still won’t make a great leader.

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Begin Leadership Development on Day One

Begin Leadership Development on Day One | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leadership development isn’t just for high potentials. Some say it should start as early as high school.

 

In formalized leadership development, an emerging trend is to get them while they’re young.

 

A recent survey by the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) found that 40 percent of global business leaders think formalized leadership development should start between ages 11 and 17. Some thought that wasn’t young enough, as 29 percent said it should start between ages 6 and 10. Just 4 percent said it should begin after age 21.

 

In all, 90 percent of the CCL survey’s respondents said formalized leadership development should be included as part of formal education in high school and college. This creates a conundrum for learning leaders, who are unlikely to have control over the development of their employees before they enter the company’s ranks.

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Why aren't more business leaders online? Richard Branson

Why aren't more business leaders online? Richard Branson | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
 Anyone who thinks new technology isn’t going to keep changing the world has got their head in the sand.

 

Anyone who thinks new technology isn’t going to keep changing the world has got their head in the sand. We are seeing progress every day online, and businesses are doing their level best to keep up and get ahead.

 

However, when you get to the very top of companies, there is a surprising lethargy about using the online tools already available: social media. Embracing social media isn’t just a bit of fun, it is a vital way to communicate, keep your ear to the ground and improve your business.

 

So why are only 16% of CEOs currently participating in social media? IBM’s 2012 Global CEO Study found that most CEOs are clearly not taking social media seriously. Only one of more than 1,700 respondents had their own blog! Some are on LinkedIn, fewer on Twitter and even less on Facebook, Google+ and elsewhere on the web.


Via Sabrina Murphy
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The Joy of Quiet

The Joy of Quiet | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Trying to escape the constant stream of too much information.

 

The urgency of slowing down — to find the time and space to think — is nothing new, of course, and wiser souls have always reminded us that the more attention we pay to the moment, the less time and energy we have to place it in some larger context. “Distraction is the only thing that consoles us for our miseries,” the French philosopher Blaise Pascal wrote in the 17th century, “and yet it is itself the greatest of our miseries.”

 

He also famously remarked that all of man’s problems come from his inability to sit quietly in a room alone.

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The Wickedness Behind Most 21st-Century Leadership Failures

The Wickedness Behind Most 21st-Century Leadership Failures | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It's not typically the wickedness of leaders (or of boards, for that matter) that gets companies into trouble. It's their failure to effectively manage the wickedness of the problems they face — problems that resist obvious solutions.

 

It's not typically the wickedness of leaders (or of boards, for that matter) that gets companies into trouble. It's their failure to effectively manage the wickedness of the problems they face — problems that resist obvious solutions. Wicked problems are being tossed up by the exploding complexity of our modern world — complexity originating from the increasing interconnectedness of everything we do. Not only are there more of these problems, but the degree of their wickedness is increasing.


The race is on between the complexity that is confronting organizations and their ability to respond to it. Leaders are behind and need to catch up.

The hallmark of a wicked problem is that it cannot be reduced to a single-cause explanation. Complexity arises from the interconnections between things — how parts within a system interact via intricate feedback mechanisms. The information signals we need to make sense of complex things are buried in a lot of noise, and we, unfortunately, are not adept at digging for cues. We have been conditioned by thousands of years of evolution, as well as our daily routines, to draw speedy conclusions by picking out simple, linear, cause-effect connections. This approach works well with straightforward problems like securing food, shelter and sex, or crossing a busy street. But we are now living in a world where multivariate and non-linear causal connections hide below the surface of our immediate perceptions, and diverge to different possible interpretations. When our standard intuitions meet modern-day complexity, a brain-world gap arises.



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