Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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5 Ways to Go From a Manager to a Leader

5 Ways to Go From a Manager to a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Taking an upward step on a career pathway is the ultimate goal within any job.

 

Taking an upward step on a career pathway is the ultimate goal within any job. Sometimes being able to elevate yourself above your current position requires redefining your role in order to show that you can fulfil the requirements of the next link in the chain.

 

These are some key adjustments that you may need to make to show that you have what it takes to lead.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, David Hain, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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Rethinking your plan for your leadership career

Rethinking your plan for your leadership career | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

This revelation led me to staying open to what would fulfill my need to work collaboratively and be able to help more people in my work life. I’ve had a long, rich (and unusual) career in a number of disciplines unrelated to biology, without ever mapping out my career path in detail. Knowing that I was a “people person” seemed to be one of the keys that helped me to thrive.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Amy Melendez
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Comfortable with Chaos 15

Comfortable with Chaos 15 | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Your career (and your business) is not a 6 lane highway where you can keep speeding in a single direction.

 

It is a curvy road that throws up a lot of unexpected situations. Economic downturns, changes in demand/supply and such uncertainties.

 

You cannot control any of these situations, but how you respond to them is totally in your control.

 

One thing is clear: We need to get comfortable with chaos.

 

Comfortable doesn’t mean that you let chaos happen around you and choose not to respond.

 

Being comfortable with chaos means being more responsive to chaos and creative in spotting opportunities around.

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Seven Leadership Lessons to Learn Before the Election

Seven Leadership Lessons to Learn Before the Election | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
With the Presidential election less than two months away, there are valuable leadership lessons we can all learn from the process as we watch from afar.

 

The Conventions are over.

 

The election of a new President is less than two months away.

 

This post isn’t about politics or who you should vote for.  This post is for you as a leader.

 

For while you will likely never have your every move reported on TV, never have your tax returns a matter of public record, and never seek an office like the Presidency, there are lessons we can all learn from the process as we watch from afar.

 

So whether you lean left or right, whether you consider yourself a political junkie or nearly apathetic, I want to give you reasons to watch the candidates, the rhetoric and the commentary over the next two months.

 

Watch and learn.

 

Here are seven lessons I am sure you will learn if you watch....

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10 Things I Wish I Knew 10 Years Ago

10 Things I Wish I Knew 10 Years Ago | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Stay in tune with your spirit. Be calm and think. Listen to your inner voice. Anticipate and plan. Take 100% responsibility for your life. Lean into your struggles. Act with courage. Maintain an open mind. Practice kindness and compassion. Keep your promises. Forgive, let go, and move forward. This is how you get from where you are to where you want to be.

 

I’ve learned these concepts gradually over the last decade. Together they have helped me live a life of purpose. Had I understood these things 10 years ago, I could have avoided quite a bit of confusion and grief. So today I figured I’d share a few more things I wish I had known sooner. My hope is that they help you hurdle over some of the barriers I stumbled into on the road of life.


Via The People Development Network
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On the Horizon

On the Horizon | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

It is sometimes a challenge for me to remember the horizon.

 

I tend to become focused on what is in front of me. My attention gets absorbed in the immediate decision we are trying to make, the specific question we are trying to answer, the person facing me who wants my help. When I walk, I tend to look where I am taking my next step.

 

I need to remind myself how important it is to look for what is on the horizon.

 

The horizon is the line where the earth meets the sky. It is the boundary between what we can see and what is just outside our sight. There is a horizon in any direction we look; it surrounds us, and we do not know what is waiting just past the horizon.

 

It is helpful for me to take time regularly to stop, take a breath, and look at the horizon. The horizon reminds me that there are things I cannot see, though they may not be very far away.

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A Good Way to Change a Corporate Culture

A Good Way to Change a Corporate Culture | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

All business owners know that it is much easier to talk about changing the culture of a business, than it is to effectively bring about any meaningful change, in a well established culture.

 

Anyone who has succeeded in effecting a change in the culture that previously prevailed in their business, will tell you it took a lot longer than expected, and the disruption to the business was greater than expected.

 

This excellent article, acknowledges the difficulties of effecting lasting change in the culture of any business, and it suggests an easier way that can be adopted to effect immediate change that can be built on as the initial change suggested takes effect.


Via Richard Andrews, Daniel Watson, David Hain
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Trust and Leaders

Trust and Leaders | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How do you motivate employees? Here are three things you can do as a leader to help.

 

Okay, to a point money does motivate, of course. And the more money you throw at me the more motivated I will become, especially these days... for a little while anyway.

 

But that will soon fade as it becomes an expectation more than a reward. At some point more money isn't going to matter as much. It is going to take something else.

 

Study after study has shown that being happy at work is more about the little things than it is about large bonuses, stock options and exceptional benefits.

 

I'm not saying those things don't help, but feeling valued, respected and trusted at work is even more important.


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, AlGonzalezinfo
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10 Ways to Tell if You're Confident – or Arrogant

10 Ways to Tell if You're Confident – or Arrogant | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Arrogance vs. confidence. In your job search you can't afford to come across as arrogant. It could cost you your next $100K+ job.

 

There's a fine line between confidence and arrogance. This is especially true given both entail a strong belief in one's own abilities. When it comes to the responses they provoke, however, that's where the similarities end.

 

Confidence is inspiring; arrogance is a turn-off.

 

Confidence gets hired; arrogance is shown the door.

 

Building confidence takes work; arrogance is simple. In fact, it's easy to come off as arrogant. Avoid these 12 behaviors so you don't leave the impression of being a Class-A jerk people would rather avoid instead of the confident leader they want to follow.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Kathleen Sutton
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How Leadership and Culture Impact Business Profit

How Leadership and Culture Impact Business Profit | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Business exists solely to make a profit! Controversial? Possibly….

 

But this is worth investigating because I feel this point is critical to business and personal success. And it is in some ways counter-intuitive to what many of us have been led to believe.

It is also not my view.


The Purpose Of Business


A few months ago I read a quote that I understand was attributed to Bill Gates. It contained several points related to business and the context of how an employee should ‘feel’ about working for a business.


Essentially, the argument that business exists primarily to make a profit was the premise.
Now, whether this statement reflects on Bill Gates or Microsoft positively or negatively is not my point.


I consider that business exists for other reasons. Whilst researching this blog I came across literally hundreds of sites and quotes arguing that business should exist for a higher purpose. Fair enough but not really my point either…well, not entirely.


Via AlGonzalezinfo
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Three Best Practices Employees Crave

Three Best Practices Employees Crave | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Satisfying someone's cravings is a sure fire way to their heart, yet when it comes to the workplace, business owners and managers seem to be constantly missing the mark in satisfying the cravings of their employees.

 

Capturing the heart of your employees is an important key to improving employee engagement levels, so it makes sound sense to understand what it is that employees really crave, and then to take action to satisfy these cravings.

 

This excellent article, provide research findings as to what employees really crave, and it then suggests three practices that employers can adopt to satisfy these cravings.


Via Daniel Watson, David Hain
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Leadership Skills of Dealing with the Elephant

Leadership Skills of Dealing with the Elephant | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How will YOU Deal with the Elephant? This is a hard question and sometimes the answer is not easy.

 

Have you ever been in a business meeting, event or even at home and there was this issue nobody wanted to discuss or bring up?

 

This is a situation where solid leadership skills are important.

 

If you were junior in the company or the youngest in the family, it may have felt like it was not in your best interest to bring the elephant to the forefront. I have experienced the “elephant on the table syndrome” in both my professional and personal life.

 

The Obvious Issue


According, to Wikipedia, the term refers to a question, problem, solution, or controversial issue that is obvious, but which is ignored by a group of people, generally because it causes embarrassment or is taboo. The idiom can imply a value judgment that the issue ought to be discussed openly, or it can simply be an acknowledgment that the issue is there and not going to go away by itself.

 

I would like to point out a few reasons why we don’t invite the elephant to the table for an honest, factual discussion.


Via Amy Melendez, AlGonzalezinfo
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Your Power as a Leader

Your Power as a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
As leaders, we possess more power than we think. But we can only use it for good if we understand it and embrace it.

 

Years ago, I had a very difficult boss. One-on-one he wasn’t a bad guy. He was warm and likable. But in a group—particularly in meetings—he become another person. Dr. Jekyll became Mr. Hyde.


He would suddenly become cold and aloof. If I, or someone on my team, reported good news, he either didn’t acknowledge it or quickly dismissed it.

 

“Okay, we get it. You had a great month. Can we move on?” he would snap.

 

If we confessed bad news, he would begin his interrogation. He would bludgeon us with questions, one after another. He often asked the same question more than once, wearing us down and sucking the life out of us. We would leave these meetings depleted and discouraged.

I was very much aware of the impact he had on me.

 

I vowed I would never lead this way when I got promoted....


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How Bad Leadership Spurs Entrepreneurship

How Bad Leadership Spurs Entrepreneurship | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The bright side of incompetent management.

 

What do 70% of successful entrepreneurs have in common? They all incubated their business ideas while employed by someone else. Indeed, most people start their own companies — or go freelance — in order to stop working for others. Why? Because most managers are simply unbearable. Year after year, Gallup reports that most employees are unhappy at work, and that the number one reason for dissatisfaction is their boss.

 

But there is one upside to incompetent management: by failing to attend to their employees' ideas, and continuing to demoralize their staff, bad leaders accidentally stimulate entrepreneurship.

 

Indeed, if entrepreneurial employees (i.e., those who have the talent and drive to be inventive and enterprising) were happy at work, or at least felt that their ideas are being valued, they would contribute to innovation and growth in their employers' organization, rather than setting up their own company.

 

Therefore, bad leadership — or, if you prefer, incompetent management — is a major source of entrepreneurship. In fact, America owes much of its recent growth, technological innovation, and socioeconomic progress, to inept managers.


Via Kevin Watson
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All Things Workplace: Leadership: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person

All Things Workplace: Leadership: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
I was standing at the meat counter at the local market and watched a leadership principle unfold before me: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person.

 

Tentative efforts lead to tentative outcomes. Therefore, give yourself fully to your endeavors. Decide to construct your character through excellent actions and determine to pay the price of a worthy goal. The trials you encounter will introduce you to your strengths. Remain steadfast...and one day you will build something that endures, something worthy of your potential— Epictetus


I was standing at the meat counter at the local market and watched a leadership principle unfold before me: Nobody Follows a Tentative Person.


Normally, they have little slips of paper with numbers that make the process run smoothly: take your number and wait for it to be called. But they ran out of numbers. Which meant we had to figure out for ourselves who was next.


The nice part: people were concerned about not "butting" ahead.


The bad part: as a result, when the butcher yelled, "Next", there was a lot of shuffling, faux self-deprecation, and confusion. No meat was moving out of the display case.


Finally, someone said strongly, "I believe I am next" and, at the same time. stepped forward right in front of the butcher. Following her move, there was a similar response at the ensuing, "Next!"


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Survey Says: Workplace Culture Matters to Employees

Survey Says: Workplace Culture Matters to Employees | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
But Deloitte reports a disparity between how leaders and employees view their workplace culture.

 

Since I'm an evangelist for the link between good company culture and strong business results, I'm always happy when I see data that helps validate the connection.

 

A recent 2012 report from Deloitte, "Culture in the Workplace," reveals some encouraging findings about workplace culture:

 

94% of executives and 88% of employees believe a distinct workplace culture is important to business success


83% of executives and 84% of employees rank having engaged and motivated employees as the top factor that substantially contributes to a company's success


There is a correlation between employees who say their organization has a clearly articulated and lived culture and those that say they are "happy at work" and feel "valued by [their] company"


While this is heartening news, I was struck by a disconnect between executives and employees about how that workplace culture is expressed and executed:

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Setting Organizational Attitude and Tone

Setting Organizational Attitude and Tone | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Positive environments are built on positive attitudes, speech, and behaviors.

 

Circumstances don’t determine the atmosphere and tone of organizations, leaders do.

Look around your office or leadership team. Is the tone positive or negative? Now, look at yourself. How are you perceived?

 

Organizations reflect leadership.

 

Thursday, I reconnected with Shirzad Chamine, author of, Positive Intelligence. He reminded me that our “Sage” is a joyful, curious, explorer. I started thinking about fearful versus confident leadership.

 

Fearful vs. Confident:

 

Fearful leaders withdraw, limit, control, manipulate, and pressure others. Fearful leaders respond to challenges, opportunities, and problems pessimistically.


Via Sparktheaction
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Get Your Brain Some Exercise Today

Get Your Brain Some Exercise Today | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
This exercise can help students or even professionals create skills of taking a look at things via various perspectives.

 

Whenever was the final time a person explored your own creative part and offered a vent for the imaginative energy? In this fast-paced living, creativity often requires a backseat. Work issues after which personal issues often overshadow our capacity of creative considering. Companies frequently hold issue solving classes, brain physical exercise or thinking sessions in order to simplify issues with regards with the organization. Sitting in a round desk conference does not always mean you’re with innovative solutions. Routine considering leaves an individual drained which hampers innovative thinking abilities. Here, we shall check out some innovative thinking actions and exercises to build up better coordination at the job and solve personal problems. These exercises may be used for effective results actually in colleges.

 

Activities as well as Exercises with regard to Creative Considering


Via Creativity For Life
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Sleep Or Die: How Little Or No Sleep Will Affect You [Infographic]

Sleep Or Die: How Little Or No Sleep Will Affect You [Infographic] | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Dedicated entrepreneurs sometimes keep working towards their goals even though their bodies tell them to quit and go to bed.

 

Dedicated entrepreneurs sometimes keep workingtowards their goals even though their bodies tell them to quit and go to bed. It is called nothing other than dedication, and it is a tool that most entrepreneurs use quite often to get ahead of the game. Only our bodies know what cost of this is. It’s a great tool to use, but the negative effects of it might be more costly than the gain of the actual work completed. It is said that you can neverget back the sleep you’ve lost. That basically means that even though you decide to sleep a couple of hours longer after a long 24 hour shift, you will still not have made up for the lost sleep that you were supposed to get hours ago. It’s just how the body works.

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7 Sure-Fire Ways Great Leaders Inspire People To Follow Them

7 Sure-Fire Ways Great Leaders Inspire People To Follow Them | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
On the 25th anniversary of the iconic business book The Leadership Challenge Carmine speaks to the authors and revisits the vision principle.

 

Twenty-five years ago Santa Clara University Professors Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner wrote The Leadership Challenge, a primer on how to make extraordinary things happen in organizations by helping leaders perform their personal best. Two million copies have been sold and an updated version of the book has just been released. Since the book helped to frame my own ideas on leadership, it was a pleasure to sit down recently with both Kouzes and Posner to talk about a topic I consider the most relevant to this column: how leaders can communicate a vision that gets people excited about going to work each day.

 

In 1987 when the book was first published, 62 percent of employees said that they admired leaders who were “forward looking.” In 2012, 71 percent of those surveyed said the same. In 1987, 58 percent of employees wanted to work for leaders who were “inspiring.” Today nearly 70 percent want to be inspired.


Via Richard Andrews, Roger Francis
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5 Rules For Making Your Vision Stick

5 Rules For Making Your Vision Stick | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

If your business is on the path to success, it most likely is being managed in accordance with the strong vision of the founder, or a vision collectively agreed to by the management team.

 

The extent to which a business that actually has a vision for the future, will manage to achieve the articulated vision, depends on many factors ,not the least being communicating the vision in a way that sticks in the mind of all required to work towards its achievement.

 

This excellent article, discusses a study that identified the best ways to communicate the vision of the business to stakeholders, and suggests five qualities which need to be displayed in communicating the vision.

 


Via Daniel Watson, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Stefano Principato's curator insight, April 25, 2014 6:37 AM

Making a vision easily understood is critical. Drop the buzzwords and corporate speak. Use terms that are easily understood, unambiguous, and as simple as possible.

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Throw Your Life a Curve

Throw Your Life a Curve | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Our view of the world is powered by personal algorithms: observing how all of the component pieces (and people) that make up our personal social system interact, and looking for patterns to predict what will happen next.

 

Our view of the world is powered by personal algorithms: observing how all of the component pieces (and people) that make up our personal social system interact, and looking for patterns to predict what will happen next. When systems behave linearly and react immediately, we tend to be fairly accurate with our forecasts. This is why toddlers love discovering light switches: cause and effect are immediate. The child flips the switch, and on goes the light. But our predictive power plummets when there is a time delay or non-linearity, as in the case of a CEO who delivers better-than-expected earnings only to wonder at a drop in the stock price.

 

Enter my co-author, MIT-trained strategist and engineer Juan Carlos Méndez-García, who consults with both start-ups and Fortune 500 companies. According to Méndez-García, one of the best models for making sense of a non-linear world is the S-curve, the model we have used to understand the diffusion of disruptive innovations, and which he and I speculate can be used to understand personal disruption — the necessary pivots in our own career paths.


Via The People Development Network
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Four Lessons From the Best Bosses

Four Lessons From the Best Bosses | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

"Having a great boss shouldn't be such an unusual experience."

 

My first boss at Bell Labs had a habit of yelling. While he was an equal-opportunity yeller, when he shouted at me in my first department meeting, I got up, told him when he wanted to talk, not yell, I'd be in my office and walked out. I was 20 years old, just out of undergrad, and sitting among a group of aghast Ph.D.'s . Perhaps this was not the best initial career move. But about 30 minutes later, he walked into my office and apologized. He never yelled at me again (though he did keep yelling at the rest of the team), and became one of three manager-mentors that shaped my career at Bell Labs and AT&T — and taught me to manage others and myself. I'll share one story from each boss and the lesson I learned from each.

 

That first boss, the reformed yeller, provided multiple opportunities for visibility up to the president of Bell Labs, coaching me all the way. He went out on a limb to make me the first person promoted to Member of Technical Staff (MTS) without a Ph.D. or M.S., and under the age of 25.


Via ThinDifference, Roy Sheneman, PhD
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Why Remote Workers Are More (Yes, More) Engaged

Why Remote Workers Are More (Yes, More) Engaged | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Who is more engaged and more committed to their work and rates their leaders the highest?

A. People who work in the office
B. People who work remotely


Via Fabrice De Zanet
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Seven Ways to Influence Others

Seven Ways to Influence Others | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Seven stunningly simple ways to influence others.

 

It had been a long day of work and travel, and it was going to get longer.

 

Due to weather issues around the country, flights across the eastern half of the U.S. were delayed and canceled. It was snowing heavily in Denver, where I had just landed to find my connecting flight canceled. I quickly found my way to the end of the long line of other harried travelers who were trying to figure out how to get to their destinations.

 

It wasn’t a picture of serenity.

 

As I got closer to the front of the line, I watched the ticket agents behind the desk take one complaint after another. I noticed how normally sane travelers were angry, screaming, and generally blaming these ticket agents for their issues as if those agents could change the weather or magically make a plane appear.

 

I decided I would take a different approach. Yes, I was tired and I was frustrated, yet screaming didn’t seem like a kind —or particularly effective —approach to the situation.  

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