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The Need to Care for Character

The Need to Care for Character | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

“As professional change facilitators, how can we cultivate our character to increase the impact our presence has with clients?”


Via the Change Samurai, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Many people mistakenly think they can develop character in the same way they might attain new knowledge or better their communication skills. They think they can improve it by simply pushing themselves to greater heights.

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David Hain's curator insight, January 25, 2013 2:39 AM

Couldn't agree more!

 

The “character” (our true nature) we bring into client relationships is the heart of who we really are as change practitioners. It is this essence of our uniqueness, not what is in our bag of intervention tricks, which ultimately determines whether we generate meaningful benefits for clients. However, our interior character needs a voice in order to be expressed to the exterior world; the “presence” we convey is that voice. Even though presence is what we use to interface with clients, the path to optimizing our effectiveness is through evolving our character.

Serving and Leadership
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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Serving and Leadership on Facebook!

Serving and Leadership on Facebook! | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Articles and Ideas relating to leadership, serving, and culture.
donhornsby's insight:

I have established a companion page to this curation effort on Facebook.  Could you drop by today and 'like' the page?  

The plans include a new blog debuting this month. 

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Anne Egros's comment, April 23, 2013 7:55 AM
Done it Don, thanks for sharing great content
Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's comment, August 15, 2013 7:49 AM
Thank you ....just liked the page Don. Love the elephants :)
Joe Boutte's comment, April 5, 7:40 AM
Great page and thank you for creating it!
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Do You Feel Pressure Or Do You Apply Pressure?

Do You Feel Pressure Or Do You Apply Pressure? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

One obvious yet under-appreciated law of business physics is:

 

For any given company, the larger the company becomes, the more opportunities emerge to screw it up. 


Another obvious but not well-understood law:

 

The more screwed up your company, the more people will complain about it and blame you.


If we take these two together, it is easy to see that without intervention, the larger your company becomes, the more people will complain and blame you.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If you are feeling overwhelmed and under competent, then you are very likely not applying enough pressure.

 
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How to get motivated, according to science

How to get motivated, according to science | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Research says to stop being so rational. Get those emotions going instead.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article)" Surround yourself with people you want to be and it's far less taxing to do what you should be doing.


In his excellent book The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, Charles Duhigg says: "When people join groups where change seems possible, the potential for that change to occur becomes more real."

The Longevity Project, which studied over 1000 people from youth to death had this to say:

The groups you associate with often determine the type of person you become. For people who want improved health, association with other healthy people is usually the strongest and most direct path of change. [The Longevity Project]

And the research on friendship confirms this. From my interview with Carlin Flora, author ofFriendfluence:

Research shows over time, you develop the eating habits, health habits, and even career aspirations of those around you. If you're in a group of people who have really high goals for themselves you'll take on that same sense of seriousness.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 18, 2:02 AM

Self motivation - now you know..!

Gloria Miele, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 18, 10:58 AM

Get excited!! 

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Three Ways Leaders Can Listen with More Empathy

Three Ways Leaders Can Listen with More Empathy | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Study after study has shown that listening is critical to leadership effectiveness. So, why are so few leaders good at it?
 

Too often, leaders seek to take command,
direct conversations, talk too much, or worry
about what they will say next in defense
or rebuttal.  

 

The ability and willingness to listen with empathy is often what sets a leader apart.  Hearing words is not adequate; the leader truly needs to work at understanding the position and perspective of the others involved in the conversation. 

 

In a recent interview, Paul Bennett, Chief Creative Officer at IDEO, advises leaders to listen more and ask the right question.  Bennett shared that “for most of my twenties I assumed that the world was more interested in me than I was in it, so I spent most of my time talking, usually in a quite uninformed way, about whatever I thought, rushing to be clever, thinking about what I was going to say to someone rather than listening to what they were saying to me.”

 

by John Coleman


Via Edwin Rutsch
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Overall, it is important for leaders to recognize the multidimensionality of empathetic listening and engage in all forms of behaviors.  Among its benefits, empathic listening builds trust and respect, enables people to reveal their emotions–including tensions, facilitates openness of information sharing, and creates an environment that encourages collaborative problem-solving.

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Chris Brown's curator insight, July 16, 3:38 PM

A nice article that discusses three behaviors in empathic listening.  Each of these are areas that we should focus on to improve our connection through communications. 

Recognize verbal and non-verbal cues.

Process what you hear/see

Respond thoughtfully

Be sure to link to the article for more in depth information.  Well worth the time to read.   

Deborah Orlowski, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 17, 12:11 PM

Coleman suggests 3 simple ways anyone can be a more effective listener. They seem self-evident but I wonder how often we actually do them? Why not try them for yourself.  If you think you're already practicing them, check yourself to make sure you really are, not just thinking you are! 

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Decision Making

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Decision Making | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Eat, sleep and plan for better decision making. How to let your brain work for you.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If you are at work and you are constantly confronted with decisions, you might, just like the judges mentioned above, start to get a little cranky. Take a break when this starts to happen. Go outside and walk or sit under a tree and read a book you like. Getting a mental break from issues that aren’t your own is essential to your own mental clarity and will help you make better decisions later on in the day.

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4 Ways Leaders Can Create a Candid Culture

4 Ways Leaders Can Create a Candid Culture | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

When leaders want to create an open culture where people are willing to speak up and challenge one another, they often start by listening. This is a good instinct. But listening with your ears will only take you so far. You also need to demonstrate with words that you truly want people to raise risky issues.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Sacrifice ego. On one memorable occasion Phil said in front of a group of middle managers: “I’ve been told I am unapproachable. I don’t know what that means. I would appreciate any specific feedback any of you would be willing to offer me.” The rest of the group looked on in awe as one brave soul, a manager named Terry, raised his hand. “I would be happy to, Phil.” Terry met later with Phil and gave a couple of suggestions – which Phil then shared publicly. Phil sacrificed his ego to show how much he valued candor and openness and that people were safe with him.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 14, 7:16 AM

Candidness comes with self-disclosure and feedback as well as questioning and listening. All 4 need to be in balance appropriate to context.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 14, 7:44 PM

Don's point is well-made: sacrifice ego. Too often, bosses want to talk and not listen. Sometimes stepping back and listening is important. It allows the other person to share their complete thought rather than only half which might not be enough.

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 15, 8:09 PM

Please read co-creating cultures of candor too http://blog.ianberry.biz/2014/07/co-creating-culture-of-candor.html

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How do you balance it all?

How do you balance it all? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Summer time is always a good time to click pause, look around, and ask the big questions. Are you able to balance it all?

donhornsby's insight:

 For now, however, take a moment and reflect on what the word BALANCE even means to you in the first place.

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4 Things You Thought Were True About Managing Millennials

4 Things You Thought Were True About Managing Millennials | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
This generation isn’t so different from ours.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Of course, it’s helpful to know how to manage people at different ages. He notes that this is where the cafeteria approach to benefits originated — the idea that people had different needs at various points in their lives. And in researching for his book, Managing the Older Worker, he learned that teams that incorporate different aged workers perform better. “It’s smart to have young people and older people work together. They don’t see each other as competition and are more likely to help each other,” he says.

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Hey CEOs: Are You Ready to Get Uncomfortable?

Hey CEOs: Are You Ready to Get Uncomfortable? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Leadership experts predict futures leaders will face the blurring of private and public life, increased transparency, and new relationships with competitors.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Leaders who rely on their imagined power over others will not thrive. The leaders who succeed will be what they term "altrocentric," and focus on others rather than themselves. They'll be relationship-centric, prefer engaging rather than commanding, and consistenyl act as though they, too, are part of the team.

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How Are You Doing So Far?

How Are You Doing So Far? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

My oh my it's hard to believe it's July 1st already. Where has all the time gone? How are you doing so far? It's time to dust off your 2014 list of "New Year's Resolutions" and evaluate your progress.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article) “Wishing and hoping won’t make it so – Life is a planned event” What needs to happen between now and the end of the year for you to accomplish at least one of your goals? You don’t have to accomplish them all so pick one. Pick the one that will benefit you the most. (Exercise more, save money, learn to dance or write a book)

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Leading Teams to Peak Performance - 5 Steps

Leading Teams to Peak Performance - 5 Steps | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Leading teams that achieve peak performance have a common purpose, vision and goals so people can derive meaning, motivation and fulfilment from their work.

Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The foundation of leading teams is trust. To that extent leaders of leading teams are authentic and real, no masks, no politics. They connect personally with the team members and create opportunities for them to get to know each other informally also. Creating common shared experiences and fostering collaboration continues to build the level of trust in the team.

 

Accountability and reliability solidifies the trust. No double standards. The leader must be a shining example of that. They must always keep their promises and do what they say they are going to do. People are much more likely to bring their best to work when they trust their leader.

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10 Traits Business Owners Need to Succeed

10 Traits Business Owners Need to Succeed | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

I am constantly asked the question, “What does it take to get ahead?” Sure you have to work hard, but there are a lot of other factors.

 

Investor’s Business Daily identified 10 traits for turning your dreams into reality. Here they are with my take on each, plus a few bonus thoughts.


Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Courage is what sets you apart from the crowd. Courage is ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Courage is regarded as one of the major human virtues. Courage is bravery, valor, standing up to danger, guts and nerves all rolled into one. So what does courage have to do with running a business? Plenty. I admit that most folks’ daily lives are not filled with such dramatic challenges. We all face situations that require us to reach down deep within ourselves to do what is right and brave and occasionally difficult. Courage can involve making decisions that are unpopular or time-consuming or even expensive.

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Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, July 5, 10:58 PM

PDGMan

Bill Brown's curator insight, July 15, 12:17 PM

To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else, means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.

E. E. Cummings

MichaelJDay's curator insight, July 25, 5:46 AM

These look like obvious fundamentals but we must *do these* to help bring us to some level of success that we aspire to.

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5 Common Questions Leaders Should Never Ask

5 Common Questions Leaders Should Never Ask | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
And how to reframe them for better results.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): So what are some specific questions to avoid? Based on conversations with Cooperrider and several other leadership experts for my recent book, here are five examples of very common questions leaders may ask that can have the unintended effect of leading people in the wrong direction. With simple tweaks, the same questions can be used to engage people, rather than discourage them.

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Reached Your Boiling Point? Learn To Turn Down The Heat!

Reached Your Boiling Point? Learn To Turn Down The Heat! | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Dani shares her personal coping techniques on how to respond to situations that push all your buttons

Via Amy Melendez
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Our culture is excessively hot-tempered to the point hot-tempered has become the norm. But if you can stay in control of your anger, you have the power to CALM a dispute! Allowing yourself to be provoked will just add to fuel to that hot-burning fire.

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Amy Melendez's curator insight, July 23, 9:08 AM

From the article

 

There is one thing you can control, which is your response to others. Reacting, overreacting or letting it fester are not great methods of response. If this is your method of coping with hurt and offense, trust me, you need a new one! Repeating the cycle of offense only intensifies each time you are provoked.

 

 

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How to make flexible working work for your business

How to make flexible working work for your business | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Some top tips on how to manage new requests for flexible working.

Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): A common misconception around flexible working is that it primarily benefits the employee. This isn’t the case if you set clear and measurable business goals and outline clearly what is expected of an individual when working flexibly. For example, could you get them to deliver a special project that they will work on from home to achieve better focus?


Can working flexibly or from home be used to channel their creativity which might be impaired by much of the day-to-day activity they are immersed in when in the office?

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How Do You Build Trust In A Trust-Deficient World?

How Do You Build Trust In A Trust-Deficient World? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Trust is the operating system of every organization and every relationship.

Think about that metaphor.

If the operating system on your computer is flaky, nothing seems to work right. Even if you have the best software programs, an unreliable operating system will cause you constant grief.

The same goes for the trust levels in organizations and relationships. Where trust is fragile, people are always looking over their shoulders. They’re reluctant to share information, collaborate, or accept accountability for results. In low-trust environments, everything seems to slow down. Nobody seems willing to do much of anything without a lot of hoop-jumping and multiple approvals.


Via John Lasschuit ®™, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Finally, aside from the fact that it’s simply the right thing to do, here are ten benefits of being trustworthy.

Psychological well-beingMeaningful friendships and business relationshipsFaster, more efficient decision makingGreater personal effectiveness in groupsGreater support for your decisionsCareer promotionsWin/win opportunitiesRole modeling trustworthy behaviorMore time for creativity and relaxationMore money in your pocket (people want to do business with those they trust)
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, July 15, 10:41 AM

Rodger Dean Duncan: #Leadership and #Trust: one not without the other

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 16, 9:35 PM

Trust is not an operating system. It is not a commodity. It cannot be manufactured. It is earned in the daily relationships we have with other people. It is situational and contextual. When I consider the ten key elements of servant-leadership, they are the hard work used in entering relationships and building trust in the daily give and take.

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 16, 11:58 PM


I really appreciate the following trust benefits listed in the article:


  1. Psychological well-being
  2. Meaningful friendships and business relationships
  3. Faster, more efficient decision making
  4. Greater personal effectiveness in groups
  5. Greater support for your decisions
  6. Career promotions
  7. Win/win opportunities
  8. Role modeling trustworthy behavior
  9. More time for creativity and relaxation
  10. More money in your pocket (people want to do business with those they trust)
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10 Excuses Unproductive People Basically Always Use

10 Excuses Unproductive People Basically Always Use | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Want to spot the unproductive employees? Listen to the excuses they make.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Productive people know how to slam out good work in a constant flow of creativity and skill. They care about quality, but they also understand that being productive requires a push to finish. When the goal is to always create perfection, unproductive people create a serious slowdown. Praise quality, expect proficiency, but encourage productivity.

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Are You Sleepwalking Through Life?

Are You Sleepwalking Through Life? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Via AlGonzalezinfo
donhornsby's insight:

Self-reflection can be painful but as they say, no pain no gain.  

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 14, 6:28 AM

Our current organizational structures are not working. 


If 80% of organizations disappeared, nobody would miss them! 


This weeks show is all about how being accountable to ourselves, having self-respect and trusting ourselves, can motivate us in life AND propel us to lead past the leadership crisis at work.  


And we connect all this to fitness with our guest, author and leadership expert, Rob Peters.


Rob and I are going to explore the connection between how "falling asleep" through our careers may be connected to our inability to stay active and and accountable to ourselves in our fitness and at home.  


Check out the blog and podcast at:

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 14, 7:39 PM

There is a leadership crisis at the workplace.  


If 80% of organizations disappeared, nobody would miss them! 


This week's show is all about how being accountable to ourselves, having self-respect and trusting ourselves, can motivate us in life AND propel us to lead past the leadership crisis at work.  


And we connect all this to fitness with our guest, author and leadership expert, Rob Peters.


Are you the kind of leader that can leverage the leadership lessons from the gym to confront the  crisis in the workplace?


Check out the blog/podcast at:  http://bit.ly/Wc7hzu

 

David Hain's curator insight, July 15, 1:57 AM

http://algonzalezinfo.podbean.com/e/are-you-sleepwalking-through-your-career/


Regularly interesting podcasts on healthy workplaces from [url=/u/441556 x-already-notified=1]AlGonzalezinfo[/url].

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Never Set Your Goals Too Low

Never Set Your Goals Too Low | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
I challenge you to make every day count; reach for your goals. Today you are here; you want to get there, so get out of your comfort zone and get after it
donhornsby's insight:

Never set your goals too low…if you reach all your goals, there is a good chance they may be.

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How Embracing Risk Is Vital For Your Leadership

How Embracing Risk Is Vital For Your Leadership | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

When it comes to business, no successful leader has made the big time by being overly hesitant and inhibited. Being bold and brash is not necessarily the key to success, but taking chances and embracing the notion of risk is.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Ironic though it may sound, it is the overbearing fear of failure here that is the major contributing factor to what will likely become failure. It is tackling this initial fear and changing the mindsets of business leaders everywhere that is paramount to maintaining and encouraging prosperity and innovation in industries everywhere, in turn contributing towards a better, in every sense more profitable and more fulfilling world of business. For this to be put into effect is dependent on the efforts of many people as well as the quality of service or product in question here, but there is only one person who is truly capable of triggering and maintaining momentum in those below and around and that is you, the leader.

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Driving Organisational Change Under Pressure

Driving Organisational Change Under Pressure | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Intense pressure often calls for knee-jerk reactions. While firm responses are needed from leaders, they should resist the temptation to centralise control and stifle frontline ownership.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Kevin Watson
donhornsby's insight:

While firm responses are needed from leaders, they should resist the temptation to centralise control and stifle frontline ownership.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 14, 7:13 AM

Pressure challenges congruence - need to make sure even more carefully that actions match words, unless the whole strategy is changing.

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Why Do You Lead?

Why Do You Lead? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

Efforts to understand the core reasons behind why we lead require that we delve into the field of philosophy. 

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Value formation helps us understand why leadership is defined and practiced differently. Our personal belief – me, us or Him – influence how we act, what we deem important or unimportant and defines what is right or wrong. Understanding why we lead also helps us to understand ourselves, others and the activities we choose to undertake. Answering the why question is both a foundational and missing ingredient in leadership.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 7, 10:05 AM

Parker Palmer speaks about the most important question we need to ask is who the person is that teaches, leads, and lives a particular life. It is the one that goes unasked in the busyness of asking all the other questions.

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How to speak so that people want to listen

How to speak so that people want to listen | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening? Here's Julian Treasure to help. In this useful talk, the sound expert demonstrates the how-to's of powerful speaking — from some handy vocal exercises to tips on how to speak with empathy. A talk that might help the world sound more beautiful.

Via Bobby Dillard
donhornsby's insight:

Have you ever felt like you're talking, but nobody is listening?

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Jose Luis Anzizar's curator insight, July 7, 9:17 AM

Excellent!!! Thank you Julian for this Treasure!

 

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What Do We Mean By New Leadership?

What Do We Mean By New Leadership? | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

I am a great fan of curation and use Scoop-it on a regular basis to bring together and publish articles and blogs on key areas of interest. One of my curates is called “New Leadership” and a couple of weeks ago one of my Twitter followers asked me what I meant by that. It was a fair question and following the death last year of Margaret Thatcher, it was one which got me thinking about the way that our concept of leadership has changed over the last couple of decades.


Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

A great article from Roger Francis. 

 

(From the article): Finally, I think that people’s expectations have changed dramatically over the last 30 years. The global skills shortage, means that companies can no longer pay lip service to the hackneyed saying “Our people are our most important resource”. Talent retention and development at all levels are now a critical component of any decent strategic plan and this generation of workers will not accept the old, directional styles of leadership. They expect to be consulted and involved in decision-making and empowered to take genuine responsibility – not just simply given a job of work to do. Moreover, if they don’t get what they want, they simply leave. Loyalty is no longer a given.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 7, 10:14 AM

Leadership and leader are nouns. Leading is a verb suggesting a process.

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Today's Leadership Word is "Celebration".

Is is important to have the presence of "celebration" in your daily leadership efforts.

donhornsby's insight:

Celebration is: To rejoice and enjoy whatever you have achieved especially when you have longed for it for so long. 

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Great Leadership: Bad Leadership & Management Advice You Should Run Away From

Great Leadership: Bad Leadership & Management Advice You Should Run Away From | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

There’s a LOT of advice out there on leadership and management – almost as much as you’ll find on dating, careers, and how to raise your kids. 

Actually, most of its pretty good, or at least not bad. I rarely come across an article in my daily Smartbrief on Leadership newsletter and say to myself “Well, that sure is a crock full of hooey!” 

However, I’d recommend running away as far as you can from the following pearls of leadership & management wisdom: 

donhornsby's insight:

What other bad leadership and management advice have you heard?

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