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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Mistakes in How Our Brains Think and How to Prevent Them | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Get ready to have your mind blown:

 

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

 

2. We believe in the “swimmer’s body” illusion

 

3. We worry about things we’ve already lost

 

4. We incorrectly predict odds

 

5. We rationalize purchases we don’t want

 

6. We make decisions based on the anchoring effect

 

7. We believe our memories more than facts

 

8. We pay more attention to stereotypes than we think


Via Jim Manske, Alessandro Cerboni, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Roy Sheneman, PhD
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Clearly, it’s normal for us to be irrational and to think illogically, especially when language acts as a limitation to how we think, even though we rarely realize we’re doing it. Still, being aware of the pitfalls we often fall into when making decisions can help us to at least recognize them, if not avoid them.

Have you come across any other interesting mistakes we make in the way we think?

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:14 AM

I can always use more explanations about fallacies and cognitive bias

Troy Crayton's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:00 PM

Thank you for making us "aware" of this article, Duane....

Lawrence Lanoff's curator insight, December 30, 2013 12:18 AM

This article is dense, but profound. Worth chomping on if you have some time. 

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Why morality divides us.

Why morality divides us. | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Why can’t we accept differences in moral opinion the same way we readily accept differences in other opinions like music preference? What makes moral attitudes so different and divisive?


Moral attitudes are different from either personal preferences or social conventions, because we believe that everyone should hold the same ones we do. When it comes to personal preferences, we accept that people have different tastes. Even social conventions, things like tipping waiters or not eating with your hands, are seen as culturally contingent. We are perfectly happy imagining a different country with different social rules in which people eat with their hands and don't leave tips at restaurants.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rest is a key part of life

Rest is a key part of life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable but elusive part of life, U.S. researchers said.

 

The lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable but elusive part of life, U.S. researchers said.

 

Psychological scientist Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, a professor of the University of Southern California, and colleagues reviewed the existing scientific literature from neuroscience and psychological science about the brain "at rest."


Via Sakis Koukouvis, David Hulme
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"Fight or Flight" Theory Debunked: Stress Makes Men More Sociable and Cooperative

"Fight or Flight" Theory Debunked: Stress Makes Men More Sociable and Cooperative | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Rather than succumbing to the primitive “fight or flight” instinct, men actually become more sociable and cooperative when under stress, according to new psychological study.

 

Researchers from the University of Freiburg, Germany said that their latest findings debunk “a nearly 100-year-old doctrine,” that while women showed an alternate "tend-and-befriend" response to stress and became more protective and more sociable, and men became more aggressive.

 

Rather than succumbing to the primitive “fight or flight” instinct, when under stress men actually become more sociable and cooperative, according to new psychological study.

 

"Apparently men also show social approach behavior as a direct consequence of stress," co-researcher Bernadette von Dawans of the University of Freiburg in Germany said in a statement.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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15 Powerful Things Happy People Do Differently

15 Powerful Things Happy People Do Differently | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

What is the difference between happy people and unhappy people?


 Of course, it may be very obvious, happy people are happy while unhappy people are unhappy, right?

 

 Well, that is correct, but we want to know what are the things that these people do differently and that is why, I have put together a list of things that HAPPY people do differently than UNHAPPY people.

 

Read more: 15 Powerful Things Happy People Do Differently http://bit.ly/IUUIwv


Via PAT NOVAK, Sakis Koukouvis
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Is Humility the Greatest Virtue?

Is Humility the Greatest Virtue? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

New psychological research shows a clear link between humility, as a personality characteristic, and helping, an action one does for the benefit of others.

 

Researchers discovered that humility is strongly associated with a host of positive values, including reliable friendship, good working habits and generosity. Evolutionary psychologists say there's good reason for that: "Humble people will be more helpful to the group because a trait that involves subsuming one’s own needs to those of others is only likely to be preserved in a species in which cooperation is necessary for survival." Humans, who generally require the help of others in thriving or raising children, are probably one such species.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Want to be unhappy? Trying to be happy will do it!

Want to be unhappy? Trying to be happy will do it! | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Despite being the richest nation on earth, the United States is, according to the World Health Organization, by a wide margin, also the most anxious, with nearly a third of Americans likely to suffer from an anxiety problem in their lifetime. America's precocious levels of anxiety are not just happening in spite of the great national happiness rat race, but also perhaps, because of it.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Should We Be Optimistic?

Should We Be Optimistic? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Being overly optimistic in life puts us at risk. In addition, people who show cheerful, optimistic personality traits during childhood, have a shorter life expectancy than their more serious counter parts. On the other hand, optimists are more psychologically resilient, have stronger immune systems, and live longer on average than more reality-based opposites. So who’s better off in life; the optimist or the pessimist? And who’s reality comes closest to the truth?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Respect is the Root of Happiness, Not Money

Respect is the Root of Happiness, Not Money | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Money may make the world go 'round' but respect is what will make you happy. New studies have shown that the respect you've earned is worth more than what is in the bank.

 

Respect is hard earned and for people it's something that is worth more than its weight in gold. Many believe that success, a high paying career or a college degree breeds happiness but that's not necessarily true based on previous studies. . . .


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Does Thinking About God Improve Our Self-Control?

Does Thinking About God Improve Our Self-Control? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

For Rabbi Wolpe, these results are an important reminder that human nature is deeply shaped by external structures. “People need a system of rules to live by,” he says, adding: “People drive slower when they see a police car. God is a bit like that police car: Thinking about Him makes it easier to do the right thing.”

 



Via Sakis Koukouvis
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On writing, memory, and forgetting: Socrates and Hemingway take on Zeigarnik

On writing, memory, and forgetting: Socrates and Hemingway take on Zeigarnik | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Your mind wants to know what comes next. It wants to finish. It wants to keep working – and it will keep working even if you tell it to stop. All through those other tasks, it will subconsciously be remembering the ones it never got to complete.

 

I would never give up the ability to record, to access, to research endless topics at the click of a button. But, with Hemingway and Socrates never far from mind, I may be slightly more cautious about how I use that ability.


The Zeigarnik effect is a powerful motivating force. And a motivated mind is a mind that is much more capable of thought and accomplishment – even if it does sometimes need to use a cheat sheet to remember just what it wanted to include, be it in a story or an order. I, for one, know that I will always prefer a waiter who writes my order down to one that remembers it—however urgently—all in his head.

 

Articles about MEMORY: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=memory

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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GranGoddessa's comment, May 1, 2012 6:45 PM
I truly enjoyed reading this excellent article! Sakis, thank you once again! :)
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 2, 2012 2:23 AM
Welcome @dj Goddessa :-)
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Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull

Your Morning Routine Is Making You Dull | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Brrriiinnng. The alarm clock buzzes in another hectic weekday morning. You leap out of bed, rush into the shower, into your clothes and out the door with barely a moment to think. A stressful commute gets your blood pressure climbing.

 

Everything about the way we start our day runs counter to the best conditions for thinking creatively

 


Via Katherine Stevens, Gina Stepp
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Gina Stepp's comment, March 22, 2012 10:50 AM
I love the last line: "Laughing babies and a double latte: now that’s a way to start the day."