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Serving and Leadership
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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How to Deal With a Toxic Boss or Co-Worker

How to Deal With a Toxic Boss or Co-Worker | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it
Are you getting pushed around by a colleague or supervisor? Here are five ways to handle a toxic co-worker or boss.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From article): Should you stay or go? If your health, personal life, and capacity to perform your work is suffering, seriously consider your future. Is the bully likely to leave? Can you transfer, job exchange, or remove yourself from the bully’s trajectory?

 

Don’t shrug off the pain, humiliation, and loss of job satisfaction that a bully can cause. If all else fails, look for another job. Your health and happiness are more important than “sticking it out.”

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Barb Jemmott's curator insight, August 6, 2013 5:32 AM

The article itself is an interesting read. The comments, however, give another real life look at the world of work.

Rescooped by donhornsby from #BetterLeadership
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New Research: How Employee Engagement Hits the Bottom Line

New Research: How Employee Engagement Hits the Bottom Line | Serving and Leadership | Scoop.it

A new study shows a direct connection between how we feel at work and how we perform.

 

What would contribute most to your being both happier and more productive at work? How about feeling truly taken care of, appreciated, and trusted by your employer?

 

More than 100 studies have affirmed the connection between employee engagement and performance, but the Towers Watson 2012 Global Workforce Study — 32,000 employees across 30 countries — makes the most powerful, bottom line case yet for the connection between how we feel at work and how we perform.

 

This new study concludes that the traditional definition of engagement — the willingness to invest discretionary effort on the job — is no longer sufficient to fuel top performance in a world of relentlessly increasing demand. The problem is that "willing" doesn't guarantee "able."


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, AlGonzalezinfo
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