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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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. #Top 100 #Leadership #Experts to #Follow on #Twitter

. #Top 100 #Leadership #Experts to #Follow on #Twitter | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
This is a list of the top 100 recommended leadership experts to follow on Twitter for January 2015.

Via Rami Kantari
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The Tyranny of Indirect Feedback

The Tyranny of Indirect Feedback | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Is Indirect Feedback used in your organization?
Do you prefer this model when dealing with sensitive issues?

The model of indirect feedback is one of the feedback models that I have been asked to use throughout my career.  Some executives actually prefer...

Via AlGonzalezinfo, Roger Francis, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

Self-reflection can be painful but as they say, no pain no gain.  

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, November 5, 2014 9:55 PM

Leadership and branding expert, Lisa Manyoky joined me on ‪#‎HealthyLeadership‬ to explore the Tyranny of Indirect Feedback and how to make the GIANT LEAP from diversity to inclusion by minimizing the use of this exclusionary model.


Of course, leadership starts with us, so we also talked about how we can all be open to feedback in order to welcome others to talk to us directly.


Check it out at: ‪#‎HealthyLeadership‬

David Hain's curator insight, November 6, 2014 2:58 AM

Being straight is kinder than being oblique through body language and hints!

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Who Are Your Coaches?

Who Are Your Coaches? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

What we often fail to realize is that Coaches can come in all shapes and sizes.

donhornsby's insight:

However, what we often fail to realize is that Coaches can come in all shapes and sizes. From your manager at work to your next door neighbor, the person on the train to your children and family. These are the natural coaches who want nothing more than to see you succeed and do well. They are there to push you when you’re dragging your heels, give you words of encouragement and celebrate your successes. Above all they share your vision and have the belief that you’ll get there. They are the people around you that radiate positive energy and rather than telling you it can’t be done, or just not to try, they spur you on until you've finished.

 

These are the people to have around you – time to start looking for yours.

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5 Leadership Biases to Avoid

5 Leadership Biases to Avoid | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

It’s important to review your own organization with a bias toward your customers if you expect to make any significant improvements in your customer experience.


Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Don’t talk yourself and your team into continuing a project if it’s not working. Stick to the facts and take action on them, even if that action is simply to move on.


Getting an outside perspective is often the most difficult. Your best friend who reviews your new mobile site is a good sounding board, but she’s biased by believing in you. Your agency can certainly provide insights into what’s wrong with your marketing, but they also want you to sign that new contract. There’s that conflict of interest again.

The best outside perspectives come from outside.



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John Leith's curator insight, August 11, 2014 9:33 PM

Leadership

Josep M Agusti Roca's curator insight, August 12, 2014 4:42 AM

5 Leadership Biases to Avoid

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7 #Leadership Lessons from Game of Thrones

7 #Leadership Lessons from Game of Thrones | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Sex, murder, dragons, warring leaders, and a wall impossible to scale. Does this sound like any corporations you know today? Perhaps, but I am talking about Targaryens, Lannisters, Starks, and Baratheons in Game of Thrones.

 

Game of Thrones is set in a medieval world of knights, dragons, and magic, characterized by long, cold seasons, and populated with White Walkers. This most amazing and compelling TV series has captured the hearts and minds of people around the world. In the history of mankind, never has a TV series been so downloaded and watched, so are there leadership lessons we can take from this series?


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Ricard Lloria
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The fact is there have been many leaders in the Game of Thrones, but very few of them are good leaders. Is this true about corporations? Are good leaders hard to find? The fact is that there are few good leaders throughout history, and in corporations today. What can we do about that? “The single biggest way to impact an organization is to focus on leadership development. There is almost no limit to the potential of an organization that recruits good people, raises them up as leaders and continually develops them.” — John C Maxwell

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Chris Enstrom's curator insight, June 24, 2014 10:34 AM

Context is everything!

Birgit Plange's curator insight, June 25, 2014 5:37 AM

Well, even Game of Thrones can teach us something....

Tania Tytherleigh's curator insight, June 28, 2014 8:46 PM

I'm sure there are many more but here's a good start!

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A great article on Collaborative Leadership

A great article on Collaborative Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
For the last six months, I have been co-designing and co-hosting the Women & Power Leadership Forum, using collaborative processes based on Art of Hosting principles. Together with Kathy Jourdain (an experienced ...

Via F. Thunus
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The single most significant piece of learning for me has been around understanding how vulnerability is the key to success in any collaborative process. We’ve got it all wrong in our work ethos. We believe vulnerability is a weakness. We are afraid to admit we don’t have the answer for fear of being seen as incompetent. Our need to prove our worth and value and the fear of shame all leads to creating separation. What I have found over and over again in my leadership journey is that when I am wiling to be vulnerable, share my true feelings no matter how embarrassing or weak I may be perceived, when I am able to truly listen to feedback and be willing to receive it without taking it personally, these acts are powerful beyond measure. This is a secret superpower that everyone possesses, but not everyone has the courage to enact. It takes a willingness to fail and learn from your mistakes, to risk the shame that comes along with it. But the rewards are bountiful. It’s the quickest route to creating trust in any relationship or group process. It creates an environment where others feel able to open up and share their feelings, stimulating input, ideas and solutions. It allows us to be human, and realize that we are all in this together. It opens up our hearts and reminds us that it’s not about the bottom line, or even the next big idea. It’s about being in relationship; the learning and experiences that show us who we truly are.

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Leadership Skills: Trusting Just Right Leads to Power

Leadership Skills: Trusting Just Right Leads to Power | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
To learn how to trust just right, we have to recognize what leads us to trusting too much and too little and correct that.

Via F. Thunus
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If you want to learn to trust just right, err on the side of trusting too much.

 

The next time you have the opportunity, try trusting just a little more than you feel comfortable and watch the results unfold. The worst thing that can happen is that you are left with a feeling of having invested too much, but you might just get rewarded for your trust.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:46 AM

From the artcile on trusting too much:

>>

I’ll never do that again’ is an autopilot rule that is dangerous. When you’ve trusted and gotten burned and you say I’ll never trust an engineer again, I’ll never trust a brunette again, or something similar, that is one of those autopilot rules that ought to be examined a bit deeper. Is this a contextual one-time thing worth learning from, or is it really worth putting an autopilot rule in place?

>>

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Leadership: Dealing With Wicked Problems

The Mudd Partnership Presents: Leadership: Dealing With Wicked Problems Read more at www.themuddpartnership.com ([SLIDESHARE] Dealing With Wicked Problems #wickedproblems #honoringemergence#organisationaldevelopment

Via F. Thunus
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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, April 13, 2014 7:01 AM

Simply and well done: a good, understable overview of dealing with wicked problems / complexity / uncertainty

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, April 14, 2014 7:43 AM

"Think total, act piecemeal..." Like in the PDCA process cycles... what problems are wicked? Page through this presentation...:-))) which are so complex and multifaceted you cannot see it through in one shot... (OK, it's a bit even more complicated...)... what I like also that you should be careful not to use generalised solution managerial methods to everything... the people are different, the situations are different... so, think before act and think in different approaches, in different models...

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Self-leadership: How good are you in leading yourself?

Self-leadership: How good are you in leading yourself? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
When most people think of leaders, they think of famous people like Martin Luther King, John F. Kennedy, or (when talking about toxic leaders), Adolf Hitler. But why not think about ourselves in term of a leader?

Via F. Thunus
donhornsby's insight:

In sum, self-leadership theory can provide you with hints on how to increase your productivity. Possibly even more important, it could help you to reflect on your own work and life goals.

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Kimberley Richardson's curator insight, February 28, 2014 8:18 AM

"Your ability to lead yourself will determine how well you lead and inspire others." K. Richardson

Stefano Principato's curator insight, April 22, 2014 5:04 PM

The founding father of self-leadership, Charles Manz, defines self-leadership as “leading oneself toward performance of naturally motivating tasks as well as managing oneself to do work that must be done but is not naturally motivating”

Marc Wachtfogel, PhD's curator insight, December 20, 2014 12:58 PM

The adage "Leader know thyself" is powerful. By far the most difficult and most rewarding path is developing a deeper understanding of the self. This is the journey into the deep dark forest, of meeting and slaying one's dragon...representing realization and the new conceptions of self that one brings to life in the leadership of others. If one wishes to lead, one must be true to one's self, to one's style, to the uniqueness of one's life experience,  and shape it as it is. This is where the treasure is. You are it. 

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5 Signs Your Leadership Style Is Outdated

5 Signs Your Leadership Style Is Outdated | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Many leaders in the workplace have lost their competitive edge. They lack the substance that is required to be an effective and sustainable leader.


Via Anne Egros, AlGonzalezinfo, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Leadership is all about taking risks and knowing when to take them.   If you don’t feel comfortable being uncomfortable  – courageous enough to see and seize opportunities that others don’t and do what others won’t – it is impossible to be  an effective leader.   These are the fundamentals of sustainable leadership.   So look around you and ask yourself the following question:  Has your leadership style become outdated?

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Anne Egros's curator insight, October 28, 2013 2:25 PM

Technology is spreading new ideas globally and so fast that knowledge is not anymore the advantage of leaders.

 

Knowledge is free but inspiring others comes with a cost: you must re-invent yourself to stay attuned with changes around you. 

 

Never before, we have seen three generation of leaders in the same workplace. The 20-30 challenge up the 35-45 and the late baby boomers 50+ may not be able to satisfy the needs of those who are changing the world around them.

 

Making bad decisions? You may have become so arrogant and blinded by your past success that you don't have the humility to listen to your team members. 

 

When is the last time you took time to think about your impact as a leader? Did you ask for feedback from bottom-up? Are you interested only in your own career advancement? 

 

Asking questions is more powerful than giving answers, do you know how to mentor and coach others around you so they enjoy what they do and don't call it work?

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:59 PM

Great scoop and fantastic insight Anne!  I have seen some senior leaders put in great efforts to update their leadership.  It is great to see!

Menno Molendijk's curator insight, October 30, 2013 4:30 AM

Stay in tune. With the people around you. And yourself. 

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Leadership: Why do we Fail ? | Authentic Leader...

Leadership: Why do we Fail ? | Authentic Leader... | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Whether we admit it or not, all of us have failed in our lives sometime or the other.Successful people take failure as a learning step in the right direction. In fact, it is good to fail sometimes, but why do we fail ?

Via F. Thunus
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Whatever problems we might be facing, we have to believe in ourselves and have trust on ourselves. We have to remember that as long as we are alive, we have the ability to try and solve it .   To overcome failure and succeed, we have to keep on moving. 
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Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, And The Power Of Humility In Leadership

Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, And The Power Of Humility In Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Humility is often associated with weakness - not with strong leaders. In his new book David J. Bobb explains why that's a mistake.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain, Fabrice De Zanet
donhornsby's insight:

Important concept for a leader. > HUMILITY ASKS US TO ACKNOWLEDGE OUR IMPERFECTIONS. IT REQUIRES THAT WE ADMIT WHEN WE ARE WRONG AND THEN CHANGE COURSE.

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Eliane Fierro's curator insight, October 3, 2013 4:15 PM

¿Qué te detiene a para mostrar tu vulnerabilidad? La humildad es una fuente de fuerza profunda que genera liderazgo!

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, October 7, 2013 5:39 AM

It takes great strength to display humility:-)

Graeme Reid's curator insight, December 8, 2013 6:05 PM

It is very rare to meet a leader with real humility.  It is often seen as a weakness rather than a strength.

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Ten Tips: How to be a Successful Leader

Ten Tips: How to be a Successful Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

What does it take to become a successful leader? Thousands of people are asking themselves this exact question. There are certain strategic skills that need to be taken into consideration, in order to become a leader you need to strengthen and develop your best qualities.


Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): When looking over all of the top ten tips, it becomes clear how they all integrate. In order to be an effective leader you need to inspire, encourage and be honest. The most important legacy of a great leader is to create a legacy of even greater leaders who can take the business to the next level.

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Sigrid de Kaste's curator insight, July 23, 2013 9:01 PM

Learning Leadership is an invaluable skill to have...

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 24, 2013 4:51 PM

These tips can be summed up by pointing out that great leaders realize that they must continually improve. Consequently, they must remain open to others and new perspectives while continuing to clearly convey in words and actions what they value and believe to be important for the future of their business. 

taniaATenthuse.me's comment, July 25, 2013 5:01 AM
That is so true Frank. True leaders are role models and should always seek improvements to benefit themselves as well as the people they lead.
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Most Important Leadership Lessons from The Top CEOs of the World

Most Important Leadership Lessons from The Top CEOs of the World | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Most Important Leadership Lessons from The Top CEOs of the World

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): For many CEOs, the pressure means that they can often disconnect from family and friends. In the limited time that they do try to devote to life outside work, they are often not fully present, and are more focused on using the time to recharge for next week in the office.

 

Crucially, leaders must take responsibility for own work/life balance and their own happiness, so that in the final analysis, they have no regrets. The cautionary tale here is that of Sam Walton, founder of Walmart and by any standards one of America’s successful entrepreneurs. However, on his death bed , he admitted that he was never there as a father, husband and friend. He had the wealthiest pockets, but the poorest soul. Walton’s final words? “I blew it.”

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Francisco Marin's curator insight, January 1, 12:17 PM

Very interesting article. It suggests a lot of questions to be answered by any leader about: priorities, motivation, dreams, change, micromanagement, values, passion, competences, team, challenges, corporate culture, and work/life balance.

Xerox Services University's curator insight, January 5, 2:15 PM

I like the idea of avoiding the "Crazy Eight"

Lauran Star's curator insight, January 12, 3:38 PM

Love this

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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…

Via Karen Dietz
donhornsby's insight:

(From the artlcle): “What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.”

 

-John Maeda,



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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Do You Have "Lightening Rod" Clarity of Purpose?

Do You Have "Lightening Rod" Clarity of Purpose? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leaders need to be perfectly clear on where the company is headed.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): People respond to a lightning rod message that will give meaning to their work.  The clearer the purpose, the better the results will be.

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5 Leadership Skills you must have to Succeed

5 Leadership Skills you must have to Succeed | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
You may think of leadership skills as something that belongs to corporate culture, but they're just as critical to any entrepreneurial business.

Via TechinBiz, Dan Forbes, juandoming, Aki Puustinen
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Ask yourself the following: What do I need to do to keep up with the pace of business with the increasing complexity of today’s workplace? What can I do today to hone in on my leadership skills to be successful?

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Jean-Pierre Greeff's curator insight, July 29, 2014 2:38 AM

The Seed SA is passionate about leadership development, and we found this article to be a promising read.

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Nine Forever Useful Leadership Traits

Nine Forever Useful Leadership Traits | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Ten years ago, I was lucky to join forces with Andrea Redmond, Charles A. Tribbett III, and their team at Russell Reynolds Associates. We gathered leadership insights from some of the world’s most successful business leaders. The result was the book Business Evolves, Leadership Endures.

Here are the nine leadership traits we featured in the book, along with quotes from some of the business leaders we interviewed:


Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Listening: “The turning point for me was a performance appraisal (in which my boss) told me that none of my colleagues trusted me because they all believed I had my own agenda… (He said) when you don’t invite your peers’ counsel in the plans, you display a lack of respect for them. (But) once I invited dialogue, I would lose my ability to control the situation, and everything would just take more time… (But I) started working on these things. And I was flabbergasted. I was astounded by the impact.”

 

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Daniel Watson's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:02 AM


Business owners who want to be better leaders to their business and its employees, need to understand the leadership traits of other successful leaders, and to apply these in their own environments where appropriate.


Business owners should be aware of their own leadership strengths and weaknesses, and where weaknesses are known to exist, take action to discover the key traits of successful leaders that could be applied to improve their own leadership.


This excellent article, identifies nine enduring leadership traits, and includes quotes from a business leader in respect of each trait.

Jeremy Barton's curator insight, June 6, 2014 5:12 AM

I particularly like the comments on Team Building 

Jennifer Radke's curator insight, June 9, 2014 12:52 PM

I love this entire list, but believe that 7 and 3 need to work hand in hand.  Listen and then communicate. 

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Managing a Negative, Out-of-Touch Boss

Managing a Negative, Out-of-Touch Boss | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The most frequent question the author get asked by the 250,000 people enrolled in his MOOC on leadership is, “How do I deal with my boss who is not only dissonant, but quite negative?” These bosses are “dissonant” in the sense that they’ve lost touch with themselves, others and their surroundings — and it’s nothing new. They come across as negative, self-centered, focused on numbers, and their employees feel like they’re being treated as resources or assets (not as human beings).


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Amy Melendez, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): So what do you do if you have a boss who’s fallen into this trap? First, recognize that these bosses are diminishing themselves and their ability to effectively lead others. They can deliver on known tasks — mostly routine tasks — but this style returns the least amount of innovation, the lowest levels of employee engagement, and often the lowest performance from teams.

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:51 PM

Start by understanding the neuroscience to manage a negative, out-of-touch boss.

David Hain's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:36 AM

If you don't manage upwards, you won't be able to manage downwards effectively!

Lumus360's curator insight, June 9, 2014 6:37 AM

Great article – Which raises the questions:  How did he/she get to this point of being dissonant and #negative? & How do we #feedback our view of him/ her, right now, without completely destroying his/her confidence.  Or do we break their confidence and wait and see what arises from the ashes?

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10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence

10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leaders must take more time to stop, reflect and assess their own thinking, capabilities and aptitudes. They must evaluate how their leadership brand is being perceived by others and whether or not it has grown tired and requires a tune-up.

 


Via Daniel Watson, Kenneth Mikkelsen, Jerry Busone, Roy Sheneman, PhD
donhornsby's insight:

Leaders must take more time to stop, reflect and assess their own thinking, capabilities and aptitudes. 

 

 

(From the article): As leaders, you must begin to look beyond the obvious and open your eyes to see the opportunities previous unseen.   Leadership requires you to have circular vision and when you begin to grow complacent, you only see the obvious details before you – rather than those they lie around, beneath and beyond what you seek.  In fact, your mindset becomes stagnate because you are not stretching your perspectives enough to see more than you want to.

 

When you fall into this trap, it’s time to reshuffle the deck, and map out the internal and external factors that are influencing your thinking. You must begin to identify areas that can be improved –  such as relationships, workshop culture, networking, how you are investing in yourself (or lack thereof), etc.

 

It’s not experience, but rather opportunity that is the true mother of success.   Be more mindful about how you manage opportunity before it begins to manage you.

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Claude Emond's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:14 AM

Here they are:


1. Opportunities Are Everywhere, But Few Have Eyes to See Them
2. Without Strategy, Change Is Merely Substitution, Not Evolution
3. An Entrepreneurial Attitude is the Difference Between Reinvention and Complacency
4. Continuously Refresh Your Thinking and Be Courageous Enough to Apply It
5. The Wiseman Forfeits His Fortune When He Does Not Trust Himself
6. Manage Your Leadership Brand or Someone Else Will
7. Adversity May Make or Break You – But It Primarily Reveals You
8. A Leader’s Success Is Never Won or Lost in One Instant. It Is Always a Culmination.
9. Give to Others in Faith, Not in Expectation.
10. Tell Me Who You Associate Yourself With And I Will Tell You How You Lead


The article comments briefly each of those «lessons»

Progressive training's curator insight, May 9, 2014 9:21 AM

10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence

 

#leadership #management #business

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 22, 2014 10:41 AM

The first lesson is a good place to begin. We become so busy we do not look up and from side-to-side. Leaders need to be present and aware of what is happening and not happening. They need to be aware of who is best served to take the reins in a given situation.

 

In School, leadership and management should be intertwined. Quite often, I found that the latter was used almost exclusively and leadership did not exist.

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Why Old Leaders Drive Young Leaders Crazy

Why Old Leaders Drive Young Leaders Crazy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Old leaders think they know something today because they knew something yesterday. Knowledge closes their minds and limits their curiosity.

Young leaders look down their noses at old leaders and think, “Stop being set in your ways. Fear controls you!”


Via F. Thunus, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

Young leaders look down their noses at old leaders and think, “Stop being set in your ways. Fear controls you!”

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David Hain's curator insight, March 21, 2014 7:03 AM

Is your 25 years experience real? Or is it one year, repeated 25 times?

John Michel's curator insight, March 21, 2014 10:22 AM

Old leaders are so busy clinging to what they have that can’t reach for what could be. New ideas are threats not opportunities. Young leaders lose passion when old leaders say, “We’ve always done it that way. Old leaders don’t realize the devastation of destroying youthful energy.

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Want to become a better leader? Take more chances

Want to become a better leader? Take more chances | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
GOOD READ: Want to become a better leader? Take more chances - @Pnoelting in @globeandmail http://t.co/DTHNNtd6Jd

Via F. Thunus
donhornsby's insight:

From article: Leading in today’s world is different. It’s about taking chances, and taking them regularly. Sometimes they lead to networked opportunities, which, through genuine alignment of interests and clear communication, can lead to true networked empowerment. I never could have imagined that a three-minute video could open up a new world of contacts, friends, clients, potential partners and speaking opportunities.

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Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader

Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

But when is being ish not okay? What about in leadership? Is being leader-ish okay, not okay, or maybe okay-ish?


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

 

But true character-based leadership emerges through discomfort. Ours, and others. It requires focusing our attention on how we can make others shine. Making mindful judgment calls. Getting things done through others, and winning their hearts and minds in the process. Handling people as unique individuals. Looking beyond our positions to the behaviors and choices that are best for our employees, for the team, for the organization, and its customer.

 

Are you a leader, or leader-ish?

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David Hain's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:56 PM

Great-ish article on committing - ish... 

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 26, 2013 5:47 PM

Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

Zian Peak's curator insight, May 6, 2014 10:29 AM

Now there is a word for those inbetweeners-  'Leader-ish'.  

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Leadership--Are you a storyteller or 'story doer?"

Leadership--Are you a storyteller or 'story doer?" | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Building Resilience, Enhancing Performance

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 7:53 AM

Here is a terrific primer on leadership and storytelling that articulates the difference betwwen a leader who tells stories, and a leader who tells stories and moves people to action. And of course, it's the ability to move people to action with your stories that makes the diffeerence.


The author, Paul Mudd, discusses how leaders (read entrepreneurs, business owners and nonprofit directors) share stories to transmit knowledge, values, and life lessons. Of course, that means leaders need to be self-aware and comfortable sharing their personal stories. Mudd does a good job addressing this.


I remind people however that before a leader can tell tell tell stories, they have to earn the right to do so first. And that is not necessarily the priviledge of their position. Instead they need to cultivate the ability to listen to stories first, because listening is the first storytelling skill to master.


I just finished co-facilitating a leadership retreat with 56 women with friend and colleague Madelyn Blair. The entire 2-days we only use story-based tecniques and story listening as the foundation. The results are amazing and this is year 5 of deliving the retreat.


I hope Mudd tackles listening in an upcoming article. Until then, enjoy this piece that applies to us all. And check out the links to additional posts at the end of the article.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Don Cloud's curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:45 PM

Are you a storyteller or story doer?  Interesting insights into the differences.

Andrea Norwood's comment, October 1, 2013 1:08 PM
I am a little of both, the story teller in me talks about the intelligent of the human spider and how they want to be accepted for who they are spiders and become equal among the humans. The story doer in me creates the materials from my stroy about the spider.
Rescooped by donhornsby from #BetterLeadership
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Employee Retention Doesn’t Just Happen: Five Keys to a Clear Strategy

Employee Retention Doesn’t Just Happen: Five Keys to a Clear Strategy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
What employee retention strategies do you use to engage and retain employees?

Via The e.MILE Community, AlGonzalezinfo
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Though, there are many other employee retention strategies for engaging and retaining employees, these tips should serve as a good start. Be transparent, have a clear employee value proposition, communicate with employees early and often, know what they want and what you want, and what motivates them.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, August 6, 2013 6:48 AM

Excellent post!  

 

From the article:

 

Hiring the right managers makes all the difference. Steve Miranda, Managing Director for Cornell University’s Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies (CAHRS), said in an interview that he believed 80 percent of employee turnover resulted from the environment created by a manager as opposed to the company at large.


So it’s critical to work closely to make sure there’s a consistent open line of communication between employees and managers, and that managers are working collaboratively and positively with their employees.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 6, 2013 1:14 PM

Trust is foundational to success.