Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
Curated by donhornsby
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The Tyranny of Indirect Feedback

The Tyranny of Indirect Feedback | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Is Indirect Feedback used in your organization?
Do you prefer this model when dealing with sensitive issues?

The model of indirect feedback is one of the feedback models that I have been asked to use throughout my career.  Some executives actually prefer...

Via AlGonzalezinfo, Roger Francis, David Hain
donhornsby's insight:

Self-reflection can be painful but as they say, no pain no gain.  

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, November 5, 2014 9:55 PM

Leadership and branding expert, Lisa Manyoky joined me on ‪#‎HealthyLeadership‬ to explore the Tyranny of Indirect Feedback and how to make the GIANT LEAP from diversity to inclusion by minimizing the use of this exclusionary model.


Of course, leadership starts with us, so we also talked about how we can all be open to feedback in order to welcome others to talk to us directly.


Check it out at: ‪#‎HealthyLeadership‬

David Hain's curator insight, November 6, 2014 2:58 AM

Being straight is kinder than being oblique through body language and hints!

Rescooped by donhornsby from Organisation Development
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The Trust Maturity Model

The Trust Maturity Model | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

The Trust Maturity Model from www.giveleaderhip.com...

 

What is the level of trust in your team?

 

Chaos? Learning? Optimizing? Or, Innovating?


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Kevin Watson, David Hain
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Metta Solutions's comment, October 18, 2012 11:48 AM
AlGonzalezinfo thank you for all the follows - love your curated work as well. Still learning how to use all the features
AlGonzalezinfo's comment, October 18, 2012 12:49 PM
@Metta Solutions, you are welcome, I really like your curated work as well. One suggestion would be to link your twitter account to scoop.it, this way you will be mentioned automatically on twitter when we rescoop your posts.
Geoff Roberts's curator insight, January 18, 2014 12:43 PM

Nice descriptive framework, but it needs a 'how to get there' as well...

Rescooped by donhornsby from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How to Take Constructive Criticism Like a Champ

How to Take Constructive Criticism Like a Champ | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
So how do you learn to back off the defensive?

 

I've always envied people who can graciously accept constructive criticism. It seems I was not born with that trait, and throughout my career I've struggled with receiving feedback, even when it was entirely accurate. At the moment I hear the words of critique, my heartbeat quickens and my mind begins to race—first in search of an explanation for this assault on my person and then for a retort to rationalize whatever actions are in question.


And I'm not alone. Unfortunately, in the heat of the moment, many of us react with defensiveness and anger or—even worse—attack the person giving us feedback. But the truth is, we need to get over it. We know there's value in constructive criticism—how else would we identify weaknesses and areas of improvement? Being able to handle it calmly and professionally will only help us maintain relationships and be more successful in everything we do.

 

So how do you learn to back off the defensive? The next time you receive constructive criticism from your manager or a peer, use this six-step process to handle the encounter with tact and grace.


Via Gust MEES
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6 Steps to Sustainable Teams: Start with Strengths

6 Steps to Sustainable Teams: Start with Strengths | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
A great leader does what they can to make themselves and people around them succeed and excel to their fullest potential.

 

A great leader does what they can to make themselves and people around them succeed and excel to their fullest potential. If you as a leader aren’t doing this, then it’s time to focus on becoming a “Maximizer.


Maximizer: People with the “Maximizer Theme” focus on others’ strengths as a way to stimulate personal and group excellence.

 

They seek to transform something strong into something superb.


Questions to ask yourself:


Are you a Maximizer? Do you know how many people in your team are Maximizers?


Via AlGonzalezinfo
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