Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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How to Manage Employees With Difficult Personalities

How to Manage Employees With Difficult Personalities | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Don't let a bad attitude bring down your organizational culture. Find out how to bring relief to the office by addressing these problem behaviors.

Via Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Essentially, when it comes to difficult personalities in the workplace, the name of the game is communication. Take the time to understand where these behaviors are springing from and develop solutions around them. Doing so will not only earn you the respect of your workers, but it will also help you foster a positive work environment where everyone can feel comfortable.
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What Leaders Need To Do To Help Their Employees Succeed

What Leaders Need To Do To Help Their Employees Succeed | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Discover through two stories why purpose instead of passion is what's key to sustaining employee motivation and growth over the long term.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Ultimately, there’s no question that passion is important as it is the spark that can fuel our drive for change and growth. But what’s most critical to our ability to bring out the best in those we lead and to support both their present and future successes is helping them to derive a sense of purpose in what they do. Of finding meaning and value in the contributions they make to help transform our shared purpose into today’s reality.
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Roger Francis's curator insight, March 23, 3:17 AM
(From the article): Ultimately, there’s no question that passion is important as it is the spark that can fuel our drive for change and growth. But what’s most critical to our ability to bring out the best in those we lead and to support both their present and future successes is helping them to derive a sense of purpose in what they do. Of finding meaning and value in the contributions they make to help transform our shared purpose into today’s reality.
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Rewards and Recognition Done Right

Rewards and Recognition Done Right | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Rewards and recognition programs can be an important part of your organization’s incentive plan. However, if they are implemented wrong, they can backfire.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
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Roger Francis's curator insight, March 4, 11:56 AM
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 4, 3:18 PM
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
 
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 5:26 AM
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
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Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had

Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

An organization is a reflection of its leadership. According to a Gallup poll, 50 percent of Americans have left a job because of a bad employer-employee relationship. So it’s fair to say that being a better boss improves employee retention and the overall product, right?

 

Both of those goals can be met by authority figures being the same bosses to themselves as they are to employees. A manager can model the kind of behavior he wants his employees to display by consistently employing these five practices:

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Admit your mistakes.

By that same token, own up to your own faults to show your employees that you’re not perfect. More people will trust you because you are willing to be vulnerable.

Answer to your mistakes, fulfill your responsibilities, and expect your employees to do the same. This tactic shows your workers that:

You live by the same expectations you have for them.You are the example by which they should work.They each play an integral role on the team.If they fail to perform their duties or functions, then the whole team suffers.They contribute across all aspects of the business.

Errors happen, even if you’d rather they didn’t. If managers want to minimize their employees’ work-related mistakes, then they have a responsibility to shine a light on their own missteps.

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Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership

Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Of 33,000 workers globally, one in three said they don't trust their employer. What gives?
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): One in three people don’t trust their employer. That’s according to the new Edelman "Trust Barometer", a survey of 33,000 people in 28 countries about trust in the workplace.

 Among the other notable findings, trust decreases down an organization’s hierarchy: 64% of executives, 51% of managers, and 48% of rank and file staff say they trust their organizations, and employees say they trust peers more than CEOs when it comes to company information. Right now, many workers have their choice of jobs that boast high earnings and a range of career opportunities. To stay competitive in the war for talent, most employers are offering a full complement of benefits and perks as well as beefing up their efforts to engage workers through inclusion initiatives. Indeed, many employees among the Top 100 Great Places To Work reported being satisfied with their jobs, but also having a high level of trust for their companies.

 That’s obviously not the case everywhere, according to the Edelman Trust Barometer. The survey revealed gaps between factors that employees rate as important for building trust and how their leaders rated based on those attributes.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 11:21 PM
When we conflate management and leadership, treating them as the same thing, we make the mistake of missing what leading is. It cannot be defined, but, when we see it, we recognize it.
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Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company

Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

 This article will attempt to identify some reasons why millennials (at least ones like me) want to stay at an organization, and what makes us jump around the industry, or even cross-over into a new one.

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 5:22 AM
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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Millennials Forge Their Own Paths — Don’t Force Them To Follow Yours

Millennials Forge Their Own Paths — Don’t Force Them To Follow Yours | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Today’s young professionals crave influence over acknowledgment. They care more about finding meaning and fulfillment in their work than they do about titles, promotions, and raises.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Invest in your millennial employees, give them opportunities to lead, and solicit their feedback. By providing them with a chance to grow now, you can ensure that the future leaders of your company will be well-prepared for the challenges that lie ahead.

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Martin McGaha's curator insight, March 15, 5:39 AM

(From the article): Invest in your millennial employees, give them opportunities to lead, and solicit their feedback. By providing them with a chance to grow now, you can ensure that the future leaders of your company will be well-prepared for the challenges that lie ahead.

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How to Manage Someone Who Rubs You the Wrong Way

How to Manage Someone Who Rubs You the Wrong Way | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You can't love everyone who works for you. Here Inc. columnists share how to manage talented people who you find irritating.

 


Via The Learning Factor, Amy Melendez
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): It's not that uncommon in larger companies to have employees who do a great job but their personality just rubs you the wrong way.  People are people and not everyone can be totally dispassionate. But a great manager can put aside their personal feelings and look objectively. I have mostly found that those people who make me uncomfortable are often my greatest teachers.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 29, 2014 6:33 PM

You can't love everyone who works for you. Here we share how to manage talented people who you find irritating.

Joe Boutte's curator insight, June 13, 2014 6:21 AM

I think we all run into people that irritate us and this article from inc.com has some good pointers for overcoming irritation.  I wouldn't characterize it as "managing" irritating people, because we manage things.  We lead people, even those who irritate us, through influence and everyday leadership approaches to get the job or mission accomplished.