Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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100 Ways You Can Express Love as a Leader

100 Ways You Can Express Love as a Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Expressing leadership love--how to show appreciation for and recognition of the people you care about most.
donhornsby's insight:
Each time you say I love you, you are letting people know you care. Take the time today to tell someone "I appreciate you" and express your love to them.
 
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One Question Every Leader Should Inspire In Those They Lead

One Question Every Leader Should Inspire In Those They Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
A look at the challenges two leaders faced and what it reveals about the power of relationships to bring out best in those we lead.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): And therein lies a valuable lesson every leader should take note of – we all want to know that what we do matters; that it makes a difference and has value. By accepting the help of those we lead, we serve to reinforce that need.
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The price of poor listening

The price of poor listening | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Hearing and understanding someone else's point of view is a learned skill that requires effort. But it's one we all need to make. Because poor listening leads to misunderstandings, errors, bad decisions, loss of team cohesion and costly mistakes.

Via Kevin Watson, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Try this process the next time you encounter a difference of opinion. It requires much patience and a strong desire to truly understand, but the result is almost always better working relationships, better decisions, and a better bottom line.

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The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist

The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Research shows that thinking like an optimist pays off big—not just when it comes to your salary, but for your health, relationships, and your overall well-being.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Optimists Have Happier 9 to 5s

People who see a glass that's half full tend to rate their jobs as more satisfying than those who don't. A study from Kuwait University found that people who were the most optimistic were also happiest in their jobs and had the fewest work complaints; the opposite was true for pessimists.

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Maintaining a Personal Touch in a Wired World

Maintaining a Personal Touch in a Wired World | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Living in a wired world continues to make us lose our personal touch. Learn how to stay connected and retain your personal touch when communicating.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): I make a habit of putting my phone in my bag or a drawer when I am meeting with someone. In fact, I often won’t take the phone into the room when going to a meeting. I am the kind of person that will check my phone if it’s in front of me, which is why I remove the distraction. And if I have to take my phone into a meeting because I am waiting for something urgent, I always ensure it is on silent.

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How to Always Leave a Great First Impression

How to Always Leave a Great First Impression | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Why the First Impression Matters The first impression is obviously the first thing that occurs in any social interaction. Do you convey confidence? Self-assurance?

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): When you meet someone, there are things you should always take into account, such as the context of the meeting (personal or business) and what they are doing at the moment of initiation. You should tweak your approaches based on these two things. When in a more casual and personal setting, you probably don’t want to be as formal as you would with a new potential employer. Also, you never want to make someone stop everything they’re doing just to speak to you if you’ve never met them before. It’s rude, and no one likes to be interrupted.

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ACTIONS Speak Louder Than Words

ACTIONS Speak Louder Than Words | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Actions speak louder than words. You send a message with what you say AND what you do. If words aren’t supported with actions, they will ring hollow.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): So, any time you make a claim, no matter how small, and display inconsistent behavior, you shatter the comfort zone –– and weaken your bond of trust with others. As a result, anything thought to be predictable in the future may be treated as suspect. The fact is, everything you do in life sends a message. So, make sure to practice what you preach. As Ben Franklin said, “Well done is better than well said.”
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How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation

How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How can you mentally prepare for a difficult conversation? You’ll want to think about the logistics (where and when you meet) and your strategy (how will you frame the problem and what you’ll say first). But getting ready emotionally is perhaps the most important work you need to do before you get into the room. Here are a few things you can go do to get ready.

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Susan David, a psychologist and coauthor of the Harvard Business Review article Emotional Agility, says that “suppressing your emotions — deciding not to say something when you’re upset—can lead to bad results.” She explains that if you don’t express your emotions, they’re likely to show up elsewhere. Psychologists call this emotional leakage. “Have you ever yelled at your spouse or child after a frustrating day at work—a frustration that had nothing to do with him or her? When you bottle up your feelings, you’re likely to express your emotions in unintended ways instead, either sarcastically or in a completely different context. Suppressing your emotions is associated with poor memory, difficulties in relationships, and physiological costs (such as cardiovascular health problems),” David explains. Prevent your emotions from seeping out — in the conversation or at home — by getting your feelings out ahead of time. That way, you’ll be more centered and calm when you’re having the discussion. You may be wondering, Do I really need to do this for one 10-minute conversation? While it takes some time (though it will get easier the more you do it), there is a huge payoff. You’ll go into the conversation with the right mindset, feeling confident, knowing what you want to achieve.
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The Shockingly Simple Change That Can Improve All of Your Relationships

The Shockingly Simple Change That Can Improve All of Your Relationships | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
How Smartphones Affect Relationships - The Muse: A quick and impactful way to make your personal...

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Occasionally, I’ll miss an important email or return a call a little late. However, nothing has happened that’s made me regret not checking my phone. I may be a little harder to reach virtually, but in-person? I’m all yours—and my personal and professional relationships have never been better.

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Do LinkedIn Endorsements Really Matter?

Do LinkedIn Endorsements Really Matter? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Like them or not, they're worth paying attention to.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Of course, LinkedIn is more than a platform for being found; it’s also a way to stay in touch with your network. One way to do this is to recommend people on LinkedIn—though that process does require a bit of thought and effort. Giving endorsements, on the other hand, is an easy, low-effort way of keeping in touch and regularly engaging with your contacts. Think of it as just sending little notes that say, “I remember you! You’re awesome!” Sounds simple, but it never hurts to generate some goodwill before you need it.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:41 AM

(From the article) Think about endorsements as new and improved keywords. LinkedIn automatically defaults to ranking your skills by the number of endorsements you have, but to get more endorsements for the skills you want to emphasize, rearrange your list and move those skills higher. Also, if you’re getting endorsed for random things or for things you don’t want to be endorsed for, you can always hide either the entire skill or the particular endorser. Just set your profile to edit mode and you’ll see a little demo in the Skills and Endorsements section showing you how to edit it.

 
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:18 PM

I agree with @donhornsby on this.  I know there are skeptics when it comes to LI endorsements but I think they are meaningful. 

Josie Gibson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 10:25 PM

Senior executives need to take such social tools seriously, for a variety of reasons.

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6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy

6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

When something that someone is doing annoys or irritates us, it is actually something about ourselves that we are not fully aware of.



Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

Now when we are in the midst of our annoyance with a co-worker, friend or even our significant other, we can simmer down and remember they are just mirroring to us what we want to change in ourselves. We rejoice knowing this “annoyance” can bring us happiness, if we choose it.

6 Reasons Why People That Annoy You Can Make You Happy 

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Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes

Difficult Conversations: Nine Common Mistakes | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Talking about differences of opinion or offenses doesn't need to be as difficult as we make it. When you know how to have these conversations, you don't have to fear them. And your relationships can be even better after having them.

 

When we're caught off-guard, we're more likely to fall back into old, ineffective habits like the combat mentality. If you're not the one initiating the tough conversation, or if a problem erupts out of nowhere, stick to these basics: keep your content clear, keep your tone neutral, and keep your phrasing temperate. When disagreements flare, you'll be more likely to navigate to a productive outcome – and emerge with your reputation intact.


Via Gina Stepp
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