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3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo

3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo | Servant leadership | Scoop.it

Here are some of Costolo's tips for successful leadership as he guides Twitter toward a possible entrance onto Wall Street.


Via Karin Sebelin
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Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:25 AM

1. Don't try to make friends.
"As a leader, you need to care deeply, deeply about your people while not worrying or really even caring about what they think about you," Costolo said. "Managing by trying to be liked is the path to ruin." 

Costolo admits this is easier said than done, but added it's important to avoid simply telling your employees what they want to hear. Don't apologize for making a tough decision, he said, be confident and clear when dictating what must be done.

2. There are many different ways to be a successful leader.
Often, particularly in Silicon Valley, successful CEOs are overanalyzed and placed under a microscope. "We take notes and we feverishly try to imitate what they've done to be successful," Costolo said. "The reality is, these people are the same people they were 10 years ago, and are going to be 10 years from now when it may not work at all for them.

The very same person they are today that's lionized may be frowned upon 10 years from now." Leadership techniques change, so it's vital to understand there are many paths to success.

3. Be transparent.
"The way you build trust with your people is by being forthright and clear with them from day one," he said. "You may think people are fooled when you tell them what they want to hear. They are not fooled." As a leader, people are always looking at you, Costolo continued. Don't lose their trust by failing to provide transparency in your decisions and critiques.

Read the article!

David Hain's comment, September 11, 2013 4:03 AM
Thanks Karin! Good spot!
Karin Sebelin's comment, September 11, 2013 4:07 AM
Thank you David :-)
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3 Musts of Transformational Leadership | To A Higher Level

3 Musts of Transformational Leadership | To A Higher Level | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
Learn 3 musts every transformational leader must embrace, and the 3 questions they must ask themselves today.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Don Cloud's curator insight, August 21, 2013 5:21 PM

People will follow leaders wherever they go ... so the question is, are you leading them somewhere special and worth going to?

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50 Transformational Leadership Quotes + Business Success Strategies | Top Business Ideas

Do you want to achieve exceptional leadership? Do you want to be a leader? Below are 50 Transformational Leadership Quotes + Strategies for Business Success

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Leadership: It is all in the Mind ... Stupid !

Leadership: It is all in the Mind ... Stupid ! | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
Patterns of positive or negative self talk starts mostly in our childhood. It is very important to curb the negative self talk and replace it with positive ones.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:33 PM

Well...my latest book: Real Leadership! Are You Ready? just rolled off the press and the first 5 soft covers were delivered to my home. Part 2 of this book is dedicated to the process of Leadership Enrichment and spends a good deal of text on how our thinking style (the way we think) impacts our performance at the personal, group and organizational level. 

 

Just as this was taking place, I was weighing in on a new discussion thread that I recently started for the Organizational Development Network (ODN) on Linkedin.  The thread was about the impact, if any, that a "management system" might have on raising the level of leadership in our organizations. You see, I believe we aren't measuring or improving leadership the way we ought, particularly given the new theories and science that is available to us since Dr. J. Clayton Lafferty introduced the Integrated Change Model and Theoretical Model for How Culture Works, Dr. Deming introduced his System of Profound Knowledge and 14 Points, Meg Wheatley introduced Leadership and the New Science and Dave Guerra enlightened us with the idea that Management and Leadership are Polar Complements in Superperformance (Process x Culture).

 

For starters, we're still focused way too much on output/ results and not effort...too much on behaviors and not on what precedes it (i.e., attitudes, expectations of outcomes, worldview and thinking styles).  And we still fix the primary passage of reference on each individual as if the cause of our leadership dilemma was a local fault instead of on fixing the system that creates the behavior in the first place. Because of this, our primary solutions are what they used to be for defects in product quality years ago: (a) Inspections (i.e., performance appraisals) to identify gaps against the leadership competency model and (b) Training (leadership development courses) to close the gaps.

 

Much to my delight, a gentleman named Peter Demarest (Axiogenics) responded with some thoughts about his work in the area of neuro-axiology, the integration of  brain-science and value science.

 

In Peter's words: "What makes this science unique is that it does not focus on the outputs of performance, but rather the inputs that lead to and create performance (good or bad). Specifically it provides the means to quickly and objectively measure how a person thinks (interprets and gives meaning to everything) AND the means to teach that person how to measurably and sustainably transform how they think resulting in significant gains on the output/performance side - including alignment with vision, mission and values [of both the organization and the individual], as well as continually renewing and improving leadership (and all other roles) at the individual, group and organizational level."

 

Peter contests, and I agree, that it is more than just the "law of attraction" or oversimplified approaches to replacing negative thoughts with positive ones. His work with Axiogenics and the Hierarchy of Values is truly amazing when it comes to measuring how someone thinks and how that thinking can impact their behavior and performance.  It appears to be in complete alignment with what the late Dr. Lafferty helped us measure and improve through the Life Styles Inventory, Group Styles Inventory, and Organizational Culture Inventory as part of the Integrated Change Model.

 

For those who are truly interested in improving their performance as leaders and raising the level of leadership in their organizations, they are going to have to contend, at some point, with their individual thinking style.  Learning about how you think is an essential part of the Leadership Enrichment LIFE-cyle I just introduced in Real Leadership! Are You Ready? 

 

Oh...and it's not a rhetorical question.  So, are you ready? 

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Servant Leadership : Kaieteur News

Servant Leadership : Kaieteur News | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
In his now seminal essay, “The Servant as Leader,” Greenleaf described the essence of servant leadership: “[It] manifests itself in the care taken by the servant — first to make sure that other people's highest priority needs are ...
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Conducting Transformation: Creating a Culture of Excellence | The Transformational Leadership Strategist

Conducting Transformation: Creating a Culture of Excellence | The Transformational Leadership Strategist | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
The conductor is in front of a choir or orchestra with a clearly defined culture. This culture is one of excellence and of high functioning.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Leadership: Why do we Fail ?

Leadership: Why do we Fail ? | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
Whether we admit it or not, all of us have failed in our lives sometime or the other.Successful people take failure as a learning step in the right direction. In fact, it is good to fail sometimes, but why do we fail ?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Mike Doherty's curator insight, September 6, 2013 7:40 AM

Lack of Goals: Sometimes, in our lives and in our career, we feel that we have "hit the ceiling."  We feel that  there is no where to go further. Our lives have reached a full-stop.  Yes. It is true that this does happen. But , to succeed, we have to sense this before we reach the stage when we think that we cannot progress further and take positive steps on the next part of our lives and career.  We should have a clear vision where we want to go.  It is perfectly fine to make changes to your goals when the need arises, to think about altering your course. We can always have a list of excuses, but to succeed, we need clarity of thoughts, self discipline and a sense of self worth.

David Hain's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:41 AM

There are many reasons - the important thing is to experience and earn from it.  None of us learned to walk withoutfalling over!

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3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo

3 Key Leadership Tips From Twitter CEO Dick Costolo | Servant leadership | Scoop.it

Here are some of Costolo's tips for successful leadership as he guides Twitter toward a possible entrance onto Wall Street.


Via Karin Sebelin
more...
Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:25 AM

1. Don't try to make friends.
"As a leader, you need to care deeply, deeply about your people while not worrying or really even caring about what they think about you," Costolo said. "Managing by trying to be liked is the path to ruin." 

Costolo admits this is easier said than done, but added it's important to avoid simply telling your employees what they want to hear. Don't apologize for making a tough decision, he said, be confident and clear when dictating what must be done.

2. There are many different ways to be a successful leader.
Often, particularly in Silicon Valley, successful CEOs are overanalyzed and placed under a microscope. "We take notes and we feverishly try to imitate what they've done to be successful," Costolo said. "The reality is, these people are the same people they were 10 years ago, and are going to be 10 years from now when it may not work at all for them.

The very same person they are today that's lionized may be frowned upon 10 years from now." Leadership techniques change, so it's vital to understand there are many paths to success.

3. Be transparent.
"The way you build trust with your people is by being forthright and clear with them from day one," he said. "You may think people are fooled when you tell them what they want to hear. They are not fooled." As a leader, people are always looking at you, Costolo continued. Don't lose their trust by failing to provide transparency in your decisions and critiques.

Read the article!

David Hain's comment, September 11, 2013 4:03 AM
Thanks Karin! Good spot!
Karin Sebelin's comment, September 11, 2013 4:07 AM
Thank you David :-)
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Leadership Competency Models – Part 1 | - Intepeople

Leadership Competency Models – Part 1 | - Intepeople | Servant leadership | Scoop.it
Recently one of my clients started the process of designing and implementing a leadership competency model. This would be the second leadership model I have.
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