Serious Play
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Serious Play
All about fun, imaginative learning and training.
Curated by Ariana Amorim
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The Simplex Process: A Robust Creative Problem Solving Process

The Simplex Process: A Robust Creative Problem Solving Process | Serious Play | Scoop.it
This powerful step-by-step process helps you identify and solve problems robustly and creatively.
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Root Cause Analysis Tools & Learning Resources | ASQ

Root Cause Analysis Tools & Learning Resources | ASQ | Serious Play | Scoop.it
View a selected list of root cause analysis tools when you want to conduct root cause analysis for a problem or situation.
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The Art of Complex Problem Solving

The Art of Complex Problem Solving | Serious Play | Scoop.it

Via juandoming, Dave Wood
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MyKLogica's curator insight, June 11, 2013 4:42 AM

Muy interesante este ideagrama en el que nos muestra la efectividad de los "Modelos visuales" a la hora de solucionar problemas/retos complejos, ayudando a "seguir el hilo" y hacerlos tangibles.

Nacho Vega's comment, June 12, 2013 6:41 AM
Interesante modelo
Philippe-Didier Gauthier's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:28 AM

#Réflexivité Cette ressource en ligne présente un outil pédagogique qui explique les logiques et processus mis en oeuvre dans la résolution d'un problème complexe.

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Keypunch / Blind Line Up

Keypunch / Blind Line Up | Serious Play | Scoop.it

These two activities are wonderful problem solvers. Keypunch deals with effective group process. Blind Line Up will challenge their communication skills.

Type of Initiative: Problem-Solving

 

Props: 25 Numbered Rubber Discs

 

Aim of the Game: To line up in the correct order from the lowest number to the highest number without talking and with their eyes closed. 

 

Playing the Game: Each participant is asked to take a Disc, look at the number and put it in their pocket. Ask them not to share their number with anyone else in the group. Distribute blindfolds to those participants who have trouble keeping their eyes closed. The objective is for the participants to line up in order from lowest number to the highest number with their eyes closed, and without talking. They may not strategize before beginning. Inform them that they must be able to prove to themselves and to you the facilitator that they are in the right order before the activity is over.  Encourage the participants to put their 'bumpers up' to avoid any collisions with other participants. Also let them know that you will be watching the group so that no one wanders off with their eyes closed. Anytime you ask someone to close their eyes you should do a safety talk about boundaries and safe environments.

 

Most of the time groups will start out by milling about trying to tap their number out on someone's shoulder. Eventually someone will figure out clapping their number so that they can be communicating with more than one person at a time. If the group gets pretty close but are not quite there it is good to ask for a show of hands if they think they are right before they open their eyes. You can give them feedback such as, "There is one person that does not think the group is in the right order, how can you prove to the group that you are in the correct order?" Usually this will result in one more round of sequential clapping to prove that they are in the right order.

 

Debriefing topics:

How did you try to communicate your number to the group?What was frustrating about this activity?How did it feel to have your eyes closed?How did other's behaviors in the group affect your performance?How does this experience mirror day to day communication?   
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5 Methods for Developing Problem-Solving Skills [Infographic]

5 Methods for Developing Problem-Solving Skills [Infographic] | Serious Play | Scoop.it
In Teaching Students to Dig Deeper: The Common Core in Action Ben Johnson identifies the skills and qualities that students need, based on the Common ...

Via Gust MEES
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David Schultz's curator insight, March 28, 2013 5:53 PM

Yes... creative problem solving can be learned/developed

Ali Anani's curator insight, January 11, 2014 5:56 AM

A well-thought infographic

pablolopez's curator insight, February 6, 2014 1:43 AM

ejercicios básicos para estimular nuestro pensamiento creativo orientado a la resolución creativa de problemas

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DO IT: A Simple Process for Creative Thinking

DO IT: A Simple Process for Creative Thinking | Serious Play | Scoop.it
Use Robert Olson's four-step DO IT process to define the problem you want to solve, generate creative solutions, and take action on your best ideas.
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Being a productive trainer is about subtraction, addition & multiplication.......

Being a productive trainer is about subtraction, addition & multiplication....... | Serious Play | Scoop.it

To be more productive as a trainer simple mathematical subtraction, addition and multiplication can provide that extra boost that you might be needing...

Ariana Amorim's insight:

Some good ideas for trainers and a link to an article on Creative Problem Solving.

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What Questions Did You Ask Today?

"The average five-year-old asks 65 questions per day, most of them starting with "why." The average 44-year-old manager only asks six questions per day; most of them starting with "when," "where," or "how much."

The number of questions we ask per day doesn't increase until retirement. Why retirement? Because that's when we start asking, "Where are my keys?" and "Why did I walk into this room?" 

In this animated three-minute video, Chic Thompson the author of What a Great Idea!, will help you "jump start" your question asking ability."

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john dimitriou's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:49 AM

Questions, questions and more questions. What are the right questions?

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2015 2:25 PM

Fabulous!    

 

Jonas Salk:  "The answer to every problem pre-exists.  We need to ask the right Questions to reveal the answers."

 

Great tips...........Parents:  instead of asking "what did you learn today?", ask "what questions did you ask today?"

 

Desinging learning, we need to ask HOW last.  What and why first.  "What is the result we want to see, feel and hear."  Then:  Why do you want to achieve these results.  LAST:  How will we do it.  

 

 

Dennis Swender's curator insight, August 4, 2015 10:08 AM

Fabulous!    

 

Jonas Salk:  "The answer to every problem pre-exists.  We need to ask the right Questions to reveal the answers."

 

Great tips...........Parents:  instead of asking "what did you learn today?", ask "what questions did you ask today?"

 

Desinging learning, we need to ask HOW last.  What and why first.  "What is the result we want to see, feel and hear."  Then:  Why do you want to achieve these results.  LAST:  How will we do it.  

 

 

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Skills Converged > Group Problem Solving Exercise: Re-Zoom

Skills Converged > Group Problem Solving Exercise: Re-Zoom | Serious Play | Scoop.it
Purpose

This is a creative exercise which can be used to explore topics such as communication skills, leadership, problem solving decision making and perspective taking. Effectively, delegates must work together to sort a sequence of images by enquiring from each other and collectively decide on the best outcome.

Objective

Collectively sort a sequence of images without being able to see each other’s images.

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