Serious Play
Follow
Find tag "Poetry"
46.5K views | +67 today
Serious Play
All about fun, imaginative learning and training.
Curated by Ariana Amorim
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ariana Amorim
Scoop.it!

Introducing your children to poetry, by David Griswold

Introducing your children to poetry, by David Griswold | Serious Play | Scoop.it
"Growing up isn't what it used to be. Today, our kids, from even the youngest of ages, are bombarded with stimuli far exceeding what we, or any of the generations preceding us, ever had to cope with. How do we keep our kids grounded in the midst of iPads and pop up ads, TV screens and Twitter memes?" Preschool teacher and poet David Griswold offers that poetry may hold at least part of the answer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ariana Amorim
Scoop.it!

(Re)Creating Poets: How to Teach Poetry in the Classroom

(Re)Creating Poets: How to Teach Poetry in the Classroom | Serious Play | Scoop.it

Helping students to (re)discover their poetic voices is powerful, vital and invigorating. Equally powerful is the opportunity for students to deeply connect with the experiences and words of others. In her speech "The Transformation of Silence Into Language and Action," Audre Lorde reminds us of the inherent human need for expression...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ariana Amorim
Scoop.it!

Five Reasons Why We Need Poetry in Schools

Five Reasons Why We Need Poetry in Schools | Serious Play | Scoop.it

Let me start with this: We need poetry. We really do. Poetry promotes literacy, builds community, and fosters emotional resilience. It can cross boundaries that little else can. April is National Poetry Month. Bring some poetry into your hearts, homes, classrooms and schools. Here are five reasons why we need poetry in our schools.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ariana Amorim from Creatively Aging
Scoop.it!

Poetry as a Research Tool

Poetry as a Research Tool | Serious Play | Scoop.it

In my research I often use fictional narrative as a means to explore deeper meanings of things, but poetry has become another avenue that results in more visceral responses. When we use poetry construction as a research tool, we ask participants for a creative construction of the topic – not a laundry list of attributes or feelings, but a storyline and expression of what the topic means to them. We also ask them to work on it over the course of a week, rather than simply churning out something quickly.  This method consciously goes beyond interviewing or realist storytelling. Its purpose is to play with ideas and discover the cultural context through a creative outlet. It is aimed at encouraging the respondents to play with, explore and invent invent imagery about a given topic.  The participants construct the plot as they wish, including whatever language or artistic embellishments they think will flesh out the poem.  For the participant and the researcher alike, the goal is to enter the domain of the shared cultural and social imagination.


Via Claudia M. Reder
more...
No comment yet.