Senior Research Project: Nursing
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Parents of Premature Baby Save His Life by Keeping Him in Icebox-Turned-Incubator

Parents of Premature Baby Save His Life by Keeping Him in Icebox-Turned-Incubator | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
The parents of a premature baby in India were able to save the child's life by using an inventive ice-box-turned-incubator. Mithilesh Chauhan was born to Aru

Via Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:

This article touches upon the development from birth to being able to become stable on their own. Like this article, the parents from india gave birth to a premature baby and they couldn't afford to keep their child in the NICU, their-fore their only option was an incubator, the incubator wasn't as high tech as the one in NICU but it saved the little boys life. Their-fore it always isn't the high tech equipment that could save ones life.

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Nicole Coddington's curator insight, April 3, 2014 10:53 AM

In this article it shows how important incubators are to the development of a premature baby. In this case, the parents did not have the money to keep their child in the NICU, and instead made a makeshift incubator at home, and believe that this is the only reason he is still alive. Although this incubator isn't as sophisticated as the ones in the NICU, it still goes to show that even the simplest technology in incubators can save a childs life. 

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PLOS ONE: Placental Pathology, Perinatal Death, Neonatal ...

PLOS ONE: Placental Pathology, Perinatal Death, Neonatal ... | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
For the search on placental lesions and fetal and neonatal mortality, we used the terms (“placental pathology” AND “fetal death”) OR (“placental pathology” AND “stillbirth”) OR (“placental” AND “causes” AND “stillbirth”) OR ...
Kayla Hood's insight:
This article talks about the comparison to lesions and the use of the palcenta from the mother to the baby. The placenta is attatched from the mother to the baby. This is the organ that links the nutrients and oxygen from the mother to the baby.
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Neonatal Mortality Facts: Every year nearly 40% of all under-5 child deaths are among newborn infants - A $1 million prize to save the lives of children under 5.

Neonatal Mortality Facts: Every year nearly 40% of all under-5 child deaths are among newborn infants - A $1 million prize to save the lives of children under 5. | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Neonatal Mortality: Nearly 40% of deaths children under 5 are among newborn infants. The 1st 28 days of infant development is critical to survival.
Kayla Hood's insight:

Neontal infants are caused by prematurity, and trauma. Forty Percent are under 5. Taking care of an infant who is premature happens within 28 days of their birth. Prematurity death has increased from 36 percent in 1990 to 43 percent since 2011. Prematurity happens when the infant is born earlier then exspected and isn't fully developed theirfore they could suffer trauma and infection.

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NICU nurses part of 11-hospital study to examine benefits of music for preemies - Nurse.com

NICU nurses part of 11-hospital study to examine benefits of music for preemies - Nurse.com | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
NICU nurses part of 11-hospital study to examine benefits of music for preemies
Nurse.com
Joanne Loewy, director of Beth Israel's Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine, plays guitar for baby Tiana Jackson and her parents.

Via Mariah Fish
Kayla Hood's insight:
Music therapy for premature babies benefits the kid and parents. A study was done on a little premature baby who kept calm to a song called "For Baby", the girl was treated again before a surgery . The little girl used to listen to that song, and her mom used to rock a radio in her arms because it helped her remind herself of her kid. When choosing music they don't no what they may like so they don't want to play to much and over stimulate their little bodies. Before the music study, they put babies in incubators and let them sleep.
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Coming close: Computer-controlled mannequin simulates birth - MiningGazette.com | News, Sports, Jobs - Houghton, Michigan - The Daily Mining Gazette

Coming close: Computer-controlled mannequin simulates birth - MiningGazette.com | News, Sports, Jobs - Houghton, Michigan - The Daily Mining Gazette | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
HANCOCK — She won’t get up and walk around, but the new neonatal simulator mannequin, called Noelle, will tell Finlandia University nursing students...

Via Alex Wade
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The mannequin noelle is used for students to grasp real life situations in the labor process. Such as, hemorageing, increased heart rate and if something is wrong. With this, you can draw blood, put medicine into the umbilical cord and it tests your inner mind on what to do in certain kind of situations. The doll cost 35,000 and has software built into it, they are trying to create a family of mannequins.
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Alex Wade's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:40 AM

On reflection, the birth of my first daughter illustrated how essential universal healthcare is to the individual and society as a whole: both my wife and daughter would have died in the days before the NHS.  Therefore, any tool which permits medical practitioners to practise the delicate, beautiful, traumatic art/science of childbirth has to be welcomed.  


My only concern? That the VP for Academic Affairs eventually wants 'an entire simulated family'.  Surely that's exactly what we DON'T need . . . . . !

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Updating IT in Medical Environments

Updating IT in Medical Environments | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
In an technologically advanced world, computers are depended upon and in the medical field, it is important to keep technology updated.

Via Schools Training
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Technology today is changing at a rapid speed. Healthcare workers are begining to operate systems that work with storing patient information such as critical and concerning patients, allergies, and illnesses. Using technology interconnects with insurance companies and medical facilties. Doing this will lower paper usages.

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MBA - Healthcare Management - Keep a Tab on Hospital Administration

MBA - Healthcare Management - Keep a Tab on Hospital Administration | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
A bachelors degree or a masters in healthcare management can really help you serve the society at a large as well as doing some good work for the people.

 

A hospital necessarily is not run by the best of the doctors but a group professionally qualified managers and they are armed with professional qualifications in healthcare management which has of late turned to be a buzz word among the people practicing management science.

 

For More Information On MBA - Healthcare Management, http://www.schoolanduniversity.com/articles/mba-healthcare-management

 


Via SchoolandUniversity
Kayla Hood's insight:

The article talks about the importance of degrees and the benefits.

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Rachel Sigrist's curator insight, April 28, 2014 12:48 PM

How and why?

Chelsie DeBus's comment, May 15, 2014 5:39 PM
It's actually really exciting when people receive a bachelor's degree or a masters in the healthcare world. That just means that they will be able to help a lot more people then they use to.
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The Pros and Cons of Single Family NICU Rooms

The Pros and Cons of Single Family NICU Rooms | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
For no apparent reason my son, Noah, was born five weeks early. That may seem like no big deal, but when you’re a first-time parent and your tiny baby is in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) attached to all sorts of devices… it's a REALLY big deal. I gave birth in what is known as...

Via Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:
A mother had delivered her baby 5 weeks sooner then exspected and her baby was placed in the baby factor, 18,000 babies are born each year an placed in here. The nicu is increasing in their design/structure their creating privacy and easier accessiblity to health insurance. When babies are placed in the nicu sfs nurses watch and deal with alot less stress. When placing a kid in the nicu their may not be just your kid, it could be other families combined thus creating awkwardness.
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Nicole Coddington's comment, February 21, 2014 8:59 AM
In recent years there has been a bigger drive towards building private NICU rooms. It increases privacy, health standards, and bonding with your child. It allows moms to feel more at ease when breastfeeding or administering kangaroo care. The rooms are also more customizable,from the lighting to the noise levels.
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The Importance of Neonatal Nursing | neonatology-outreach.org

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The importance of neonatal nursing is improving. Neonatal Rns work with the newborn baby and the family to let them no what is going on.Their are many time of neonatalist nurses, intensive care, nurses, extensive care nurses, who take care of the sickest babies and have to look after them the most. Neontal nurses with a bachelor degree in science become specialists who need to maintain focus since they are working with families, co workers, and the medical team. Equipment is becoming bigger and more expensive thus needing more nurses.

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Nursing - career in the medical field

Nursing - career in the medical field | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Nursing is one of the noblest professions in the healthcare industry that require a great compassionate mind towards the sick and disabled ones.

 

For More Information On Nursing,

http://www.schoolanduniversity.com/nursing


Via SchoolandUniversity
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This article talks about what degrees you can obtain an  the payroll for certain types of nursing.

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Advanced Technologies NICU | Saint Peter's HealthCare System

Advanced Technologies NICU | Saint Peter's HealthCare System | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Premature and critically ill newborns often have respiratory problems.

Via Mary Ellicker
Kayla Hood's insight:

Advanced technologies have created tremendous outcomes for sick newborns usually with respiratory problems. Venilation is used to create less stress on a new borns lungs, Nitric oxide is a treatment for respiratory failure and now they are studying a way so that newborns can create their own diaphram level so that oxygen can release to the brain.

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Mary Ellicker's comment, February 13, 2014 9:46 AM
8. Babies that are born as preemies have respiratory issues a lot of the time. There are ventilators that are made specifically to aid these kinds of babies so that they eventually reach healthy levels
Mary Ellicker's comment, February 13, 2014 9:48 AM
9. the Hypothermia Program was made to aid the sickest of infants suffering from asphyxia, which is a lack of oxygen after birth. This program gives infants suffering from this a fighting chance for a fairly normal life
Mary Ellicker's comment, February 13, 2014 9:50 AM
10. Sometimes, there are long term effects that occur from issues as infants. HIE (hypoxic0ischemic encephalopathy) often leads to cerebral palsy, mental retardation, learning disabilities, and vision or hearing impairments. That is why this program is of such extreme importance.
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New NICU Room System Improves Outcomes - Laboratory Equipment

New NICU Room System Improves Outcomes - Laboratory Equipment | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Laboratory Equipment
New NICU Room System Improves Outcomes
Laboratory Equipment
The design of Sunnybrook's new NICU has significantly improved parent and staff satisfaction.

Via Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:

Nicu rooms started off as open bay rooms which consisted of only being able to have 12 babies for every 40 sq feet, now that they have remodeled to the nicu they can fit 48 babies from every 120 sq feet. The improvements of the expansion have created more room for staff, family, less medical errors, infections, and have lowered the cost by 500 dollars.

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Nicole Coddington's comment, February 21, 2014 10:46 AM
The new NICU allowed doctors nurses and parents to see the changes between the old NICU and the new more private one. They measured satisfaction levels six months before the move, and then again six months and a year after the move into the new NICU. This showed an increase in satisfaction between both parents and doctors alike, and cut costs by $500
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Neonatal Nursing: Making a Difference, Changing Lives

Academy of Neonatal Nursing - 2011 Anniversary Video.

Via Kayli Ciongoli
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Incubators - Machines That Ensure That Your Little Ones Breathe ...

Incubators - Machines That Ensure That Your Little Ones Breathe ... | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
NICU Incubators are essentially used for controlling temperature and environment of underweight infants and pre-mature born babies. Temperature regulation is especially important when it comes to new borns as their ...

Via Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:

This article touches upon the use of incubators an how much they have gradually effected the NICU. The importance of the incubators is to keep the babies warm and increase their breathing  habits for their little lungs.

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Nicole Coddington's curator insight, April 2, 2014 11:00 AM
This article discusses the importance of incubators and how with furthering technology they are becoming more and more useful and vital for the care of infants in the NICU. They keep the babies warm as well as make the air that they breath safer and more suitable for their fragile lungs.
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Q&A with Joy Lawn: Kangaroo Mother Care - Voice of America

Q&A with Joy Lawn: Kangaroo Mother Care - Voice of America | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Voice of America
Q&A with Joy Lawn: Kangaroo Mother Care
Voice of America
A mother's touch really cam save a child's life. That's the claim behind Kangaroo Mother Care.

Via Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:

Kangaroo Mother care is very beneficial to the baby and the mothers touch helps it to feel more safe then being seperated from their mom. Studies have shown that the mothers touch of skin has prevented infections, protect the baby from other bugs, and helped the effect on the brain. Asia has the highest rate of small premature babies weighing only 2.5 kilograms.

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Nicole Coddington's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:07 AM
This article once again highlights the importance of kangaroo care,and also shows that through studies when babies are part of kangaroo care,they pick up certain protections from their mothers skin,that then protect them from other infections in the NICU. It is also shown to help brain development and stabilize vital signs.
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15 Important Facts about Neonatal Intensive Care Units

15 Important Facts about Neonatal Intensive Care Units | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
What to Look for in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Introduction
Number of Babies Treated
Outcomes of Very Premature Infants at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital
Round-the-Clock Care
Nutritional Care
Respiratory Care
Noise and Light Control
Unnecessary Tests
Team Approach
Access to Information
Parent Support Resources
Parents Accommodations
Visiting Policy
Preparation for Release
Follow-Up Care
Research
Summary

Introduction

Few expectant parents consider the possibility that their baby might need special medical care after birth. Even fewer think about what neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) their baby might be sent to if such care is needed. If your pregnancy is high-risk and you learn that your baby may need special care, you might consider where your baby should receive that care. What you learn may affect your decision about where to deliver your baby, or to which NICU your baby should be transferred after birth if intensive care is needed. One out of nine expectant mothers does not carry to full term (37 or more weeks). Approximately four percent of babies - roughly 100,000 babies annually - end up in an NICU. With statistics like these, expectant parents need to know even before the birth of their child what to look for in an NICU.
Although it seems difficult to do, expectant parents should ask their doctor what will happen if something goes wrong. The most important question may well be what NICU your baby will be admitted to. Neonatologists are the physicians with the most training and expertise in the care of critically ill infants. A neonatologist is a pediatrician with additional training in newborn intensive care. You should ask whether neonatologists are readily available around the clock at the NICU you are considering?
In general, the most advanced care is available in hospitals that are affiliated with medical schools, such as the University of Iowa Children's Hospital at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Most such hospitals offer a full range of services to meet the needs of women with high-risk pregnancies and their babies. To learn more about the specific services provided by an NICU, consider the following questions.
Number of Babies Treated

What is the total number of premature or critically-ill babies cared for in a typical year? What are the results, and how do these compare to other hospitals? Volume of experience is not the only important consideration, but in general, you can expect better results in NICUs that treat larger numbers of babies. In addition, larger programs tend to have a greater depth of resources. The NICU at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital treats approximately 850 babies per year. Recent survival figures for babies born very prematurely and treated at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital are shown below.
Outcomes of Very Premature Infants at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital

The figures below are representative of the outcomes of very premature infants cared for in our NICU. Data from the Vermont-Oxford Network (VON), a voluntary collaboration of over 800 NICUs from around the world is provided for comparison.
Round-the-Clock Care

Are there dedicated neonatologists available 24-hours a day?
Nutritional Care

How are the nutritional needs of your infant addressed during his or her stay? Is there a nutritionist with specialized expertise in the nutritional support of NICU patients? Does the nutritionist make rounds and review the nutritional care of each baby? Is breastfeeding encouraged, even for very sick or premature babies? Are certified lactation consultants available? Do they have experience providing support to the mothers of critically ill and premature babies? Are pediatric gastroenterologists available for consultation if needed.
Respiratory Care

Are all the latest respiratory therapies available? Because respiratory problems are the most common problem faced in the NICU, this is critical. Some NICUs do not have high-frequency ventilation, nitric oxide, or ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), and the time it takes to transfer the baby to a center that provides these therapies may delay treatment. Recent research has shown that high-frequency ventilation and nitric oxide, used in combination, can reduce the likelihood that more dangerous and expensive treatments such as ECMO will be needed for critically ill full-term babies. In addition, high-frequency ventilation reduces the risks of ventilator-induced lung injury in small premature babies.
Noise and Light Control

Are efforts made to minimize the effects of sound and light on NICU patients? Recent studies have shown that the littlest patients do better when noise is minimized and when direct light is reduced.
Unnecessary Tests

Are there guidelines and appropriate programs in place to eliminate unnecessary tests? Constant monitoring of blood gases and other tests that require frequent withdrawal of blood often can be decreased or obtained less frequently, depending on the baby's risk factors and current condition. Fewer tests mean less stress and more uninterrupted sleep for the baby.
Team Approach

Is there a multidisciplinary approach to your infant's care? Are staff members trained in providing individualized developmental assessment and care? To insure the most rapid progress and most favorable outcomes, the University of Iowa Children's Hospital uses a team that includes all care providers, including a faculty neonatologist, other physicians, nurse practitioners, staff nurses and nurse educators, respiratory therapists, nutritionists, social workers, pharmacists, physical therapists, and other experts, who can analyze the full scope of an infant's medical and developmental progress, and address problems as they arise. Are specialists of all types available for consultation?: pediatric surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, pediatric heart surgeons, pediatric ophthalmologists (with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of retinopathy of prematurity), pediatric ear-nose-and-throat surgeons, pediatric gastroenterologists, pediatric neurologists, pediatric infectious disease specialists, pediatric orthopedic surgeons, pediatric endocrinologists, pediatric urologists, pediatric geneticists, pediatric hematologists, pediatric nephrologists, and developmental pediatricians. It is important that these specialists and subspecialists be focused on the care of children. All of these specialty services are available at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital.
Access to Information

How accessible are the physicians for answering parents' questions? Are regular updates provided to the parents? Are conferences with the key caregivers available on request?
Parent Support Resources

What support services are available for parents? A long-term NICU stay can be as hard on Mom and Dad as it is on the infant. Are counseling and other social support services available? Are veteran parents available to provide support and information? Is there a formal peer support program? Is there a parent library? Do parents have access to the Internet while visiting their baby in the NICU? These services are available at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital. Our group of veteran parents who provide support for new NICU parents is called The Parent Connection.
Parent Accommodations

Are there accommodations available within the hospital for parents who wish to sleep near their baby? How close, how quiet, and how comfortable are these accommodations? The University of Iowa Children's Hospital offers parents the opportunity to stay within the hospital at the Helen K. Rossi Volunteer Guest House. The Iowa City Ronald McDonald House also provides comfortable, inexpensive accommodations for the parents and other family members of University of Iowa Children's Hospital patients.
Visiting Policy

Do parents have unlimited visiting privileges? How are other visitors screened? May siblings visit?
Preparation for Release

How will the NICU prepare for the release of your baby? Will they involve your pediatrician or family physician in planning for your baby's release, and work with him or her to safeguard the baby after discharge from the hospital? Do parents receive training and a thorough explanation of what to expect? Training can make a big difference in a family's ability to cope with the demands of a fragile infant.
Follow-Up Care

Are members of the NICU team involved in the care of the baby after discharge? Is developmental follow-up available? At the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, most NICU graduates are enrolled in the Iowa High-Risk Infant Follow-Up Program, a program consisting of periodic examinations during the first three years of life to monitor the baby's growth and development. The most fragile infants are followed in our clinic by a neonatologist of the family's choice and a nurse practitioner. The University of Iowa Children's Hospital team works closely with the child's physician to see that the remaining medical problems are gradually overcome. Immunizations against respiratory virus infections are given to these infants during winter virus season.
Research

What research is currently underway at the NICU chosen for your child? The pace of improvements in medical care is rapid, and involvement in research is a good indicator of whether your NICU is a leader in developing new and improved treatments. The NICU at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital is involved in research designed to reduce the premature infant's need for blood transfusions and to provide safer transfusions when necessary. Other research projects are underway to provide new insights into the best ways to nourish sick and premature babies.
Summary

Approximately 850 babies are admitted each year to the Special Care Nurseries (NICU and Intermediate Care Nursery) of the University of Iowa Children's Hospital. The University of Iowa Children's Hospital is the primary pediatric teaching and research hospital for the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Since the NICU was begun in 1974, care has been provided to almost 20,000 babies. Approximately 60% of our babies are born at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. The other 40% are transported from other hospitals throughout Iowa and nearby states. The survival among all babies treated in the NICU is over 95%. The University of Iowa Children's Hospital NICU is known worldwide for its expertise in advanced respiratory care, particularly the use of high-frequency ventilation. Educational programs and consultation are frequently provided to physicians and nurses from throughout the U.S. and many other countries, including Austria, Portugal, India, Korea, Russia, Egypt, Ukraine, and Romania. The neonatologists at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital are all faculty members of the University of Iowa College of Medicine.
NICUs that are operated by university teaching hospitals often provide the most advanced care available. Their physicians are involved in the research that leads to improved methods of care, so the newest cutting-edge treatments are available first in university NICUs. Moreover, the faculty neonatologists at university hospitals write the textbooks and provide both the initial training and continuing education of other neonatologists. In a university NICU, such as the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, your child will benefit from the combined expertise of a large number of faculty neonatologists (13 at UI Children's Hospital) who are personally involved in the research that leads to improved treatments and in the training of other neonatologists and pediatricians.
We hope this material gives you some idea of the questions you should ask when evaluating the NICU where your baby might receive care if needed. You should not hesitate to ask questions of the staff in the NICU you are assessing. Ask to speak with the nurse manager or the medical director. If their unit provides top-notch service, they will welcome your questions, will offer you a tour of their facilities, and will put you in touch with members of their parent support group or other veteran parents. We hope that your pregnancy will end happily and that your baby will not need the services of an NICU. But if you have found your way to this website, your are probably facing the possibility that your baby will need the type of care provided by an NICU. If so, this information will probably help you to ask the right questions and make the right choices.
Edward F. Bell, MD

Professor in the Department of Pediatrics

University of Iowa Children's Hospital
Peer Review Status: Internally Peer Reviewed

First Published: 1999

Last Reviewed: 2009
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Accelerating Global Practice of Kangaroo Mother Care

Accelerating Global Practice of Kangaroo Mother Care | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
If universal KMC coverage was achieved, it is estimated that it could save the lives of more than 450,000 preterm newborns each year.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:
Kangaroo mother care developed thirty five years ago in bogota due to the lack of incubators for premature babies. Kangaroo care is skin to skin contact from the mother to the child thus creating stability, warmth, and the reduction of infection by fifty percent. KMC has saved over 450,000 premature newborns and has brought together twenty orginizations.
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Nicole Coddington's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:04 AM

This article highlights the importance of kangaroo care, and shows that if mothers world wide had access to proper kangaroo care that the lives of over 450,000 babies could be saved each year. Organizations are trying to raise money to properly train hospitals to carry out this life saving technique. 

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As consumer tech speeds up innovation in health, can traditional med tech keep up? | GigaOM Health Tech News

As consumer tech speeds up innovation in health, can traditional med tech keep up? | GigaOM Health Tech News | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it

Consumer tech and telecom names like Verizon, AT&T and Sony may be relative newcomers to healthcare, but that doesn’t mean they’re not going to give industry stalwarts a run for their money.


According to a Monday report from PriceWaterHouseCoopers (PwC) the medical technology field is in the midst of big change. Medtech is transitioning from a growth industry to a more mature, stable one.  But it’s also being shaped by a changing healthcare economy that’s more consumer-centric and emphasizes comprehensive approaches to treating diseases and providing care, the report said.


And, increasingly, companies accustomed to spending heavily on years of research are facing new competition from consumer tech startups and mobile app makers that are steeped in a culture of ‘faster, better, cheaper.’


“The new entrants from other industries have a much more aggressive view of what innovation is than traditional medtech companies,” said Chris Wasden, managing director of PwC’s healthcare strategy and innovation practice. “That will put these traditional medtech companies in a very uncomfortable mode… they’re not using to operating at the step-change mode of innovation.”


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How Healthcare Informatics Improves Medical Care | gescienceprize ...

Healthcare informatics is a term that refers to the use of information technology in the medical field. There are many applications for healthcare informatics, most of which use computers. The general uses of healthcare ...

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Simulating The NICU Experience - Healthcare Design

Simulating The NICU Experience - Healthcare Design | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Simulating The NICU Experience Healthcare Design The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was selected as the subject of the 2013 PESL, in order to explore benefits and challenges of single-family patient rooms, a design choice many new facilities...

Via Nicole Coddington
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Nicole Coddington's comment, February 21, 2014 9:04 AM
Participants were able to go through the NICU experience step by step, including different scenarios that would take place and day to day life in a NICU.From there, doctors and nurses were able to see what works and what doesnt work for parents, as well as themselves. This allows for better care of infants in the NICU, along with better understanding between parents and doctors.
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Kangaroo Care Offers Developmental Benefits for Premature Newborns

Kangaroo Care Offers Developmental Benefits for Premature Newborns | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Research shows chest-to-chest touching between baby and mother offers benefits beyond bonding and breastfeeding for the tiniest newborns.

Via Jocelyn Stoller, Nicole Coddington
Kayla Hood's insight:

Kangaroo care offers more benefits to those who recieve little to none. A study was done in germany where premature infants used kangaroo skin to skin contact and were able to leave the nicu three weeks earlier compared to those who recieved little to none. Babies were held for twenty two hours.

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Nicole Coddington's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:12 AM

This article shows evidence of studies done in germany where babies who have constant kangaroo care leave the NICU up to three weeks earlier than babies who receive little to no kangaroo care. It says that ideally babies should be held skin to skin for 22 hours a day for the first six weeks, and since that is so demanding, most NICU's offer nurses who can step in and help. 

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Neonatal Nursing Career Info | content

Neonatal Nursing Career Info | content | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
NANN

Via Lindsey
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Neonatal nursing specializes in the care of newborns, sick, premature, infected, and those who have surgical problems. Nurses take care of the newborn from birth until they are elegible for discharge. Forty thousand babies are born with low birth rates and they are ten times better now than fifteen years ago. The NANN foundation has over 7,000 nurses that specialize in this job. As a neonatal nurse you start out as a staff nurse taking care of critical babies. To obtain the job of a neonatal nurse you need to require an associates degree, bachelors, masters, and a diploma.

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Lindsey's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:48 PM

My thoughts

After having read this article about neonatal nursing, I really learned more about what you might have to deal with. I would be working with infants who have a variety of problems such as prematurity, birth defects, cardiac malformations, and surgical problems. Newborns in the NICU are often there for about 6 months. In some cases, a neonatal nurse may care for infants up to about age two. Typically, neonatal nurses care for infants from the time they were born until they have been discharged from the hospital.  I found it interesting that I will be working with the moms as well, teaching them how to care for their newborn. It is an extremely rewarding job. This job allows the neonatal nurses to make a difference in the lives of infants and their families. I think it is wonderful that many neonatal nurses continue to hear from families and infants that they have cared for throughout their lives.

Rescooped by Kayla Hood from Digital Medicine
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Moore Law will Continue to Change Medical and Healthcare

Moore Law will Continue to Change Medical and Healthcare | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Moores Law will continue to have more profound changes in Medicine and Healthcare, in general, in all aspects, including Medical devices, medical apps, and administration

Via John Bennett MD
Kayla Hood's insight:
Moores law was created in 1965, by gordon moore. Moore's law is linked to the speed, memory, sensors, pixels and cameras. Over the next few years and into the future their will be an increase of the study of images, biosensors, an the human body. Their-fore, medic al devices and job applications will be moving rapidly.
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Rescooped by Kayla Hood from Neonatal Nursing
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Premature Babies Used As Lab Rats In Manipulated Vaccine Trials

Premature Babies Used As Lab Rats In Manipulated Vaccine Trials | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
A vaccination trial on premature babies funded by GlaxoSmithKline...just by reading this study through anyone with an ounce of sense can see that it is weighted in favor of the researchers.

Via Sepp Hasslberger, Mariah Fish
Kayla Hood's insight:
This article talks about how the premature babies were used as lab rats to test multiple vaccinations. Such as the rotavirus, 998 babies were being tested on between the ages of 27-36 weeks of age. They experienced the side effects of vomiting, appetite loss, and a fever of 39.5 degrees c.
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Rescooped by Kayla Hood from Innovation in Healthcare Education
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Effect of Nursing Education on Positioning of Infants in the... : Pediatric Physical Therapy

Effect of Nursing Education on Positioning of Infants in the... : Pediatric Physical Therapy | Senior Research Project: Nursing | Scoop.it
Purpose: To determine the effect of different forms of education on nurses' abilities to position ne (International Focus: Effect of Nursing Education on Positioning of Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: ...)...

Via Avon von Nova
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