Senior research paper- heart disease
859 views | +0 today
Follow
Senior research paper- heart disease
Definition, how it is formed, how to maintain a healthy heart, and all about heart disease.
Curated by Jamie callihan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Heart disease - MayoClinic.com

Heart disease - MayoClinic.com | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Heart disease — Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, causes, treatments and prevention of heart disease.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:38 AM
The term heart disease describes a range of diseases that affect the heart. These can include diseases of the blood vessels (Coronary artery disease), heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), heart infections; and defects that are there from birth (congenital heart defects). This term can also be interchanged with cardiovascular disease which is the blocked blood vessels, heart attacks, chest pain, or strokes. Other things these terms can be related with are infections and conditions affecting the muscle of the heart and valves or beating rhythms. All these things, except the defects that people are born with can usually be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Heart disease in women: Understand symptoms and risk factors - MayoClinic.com

Heart disease in women: Understand symptoms and risk factors - MayoClinic.com | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
All women face the threat of heart disease. Discover how to protect your heart.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:33 AM
More women than men die from heart disease each year. Fortunately, women’s risks can take steps to understand their symptoms and reduce their risk. A few of the most common symptoms in women are pain, pressure, or discomfort in the chest. However, it does not have to be severe. In fact, women are more likely to have symptoms unrelated to chest pain; shortness of breath, nausea (vomiting), sweating, lightheadedness (dizziness), and unusual fatigue. In addition to these, women can have small vessel heart disease or micro vascular disease. Women get blockages not only in their main arteries, but in the smaller ones that supply blood to the heart too. Not being familiar with these unique symptoms usually leaves women in the ER after a lot of heart damage has been done. Other heart disease risk factors for women are the obvious high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and obesity, but others are metabolic syndrome (fat around the abdomen, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high triglycerides), mental stress/depression (makes it difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle and follow treatment), smoking, and low levels of estrogen after menopause (small vessel heart disease). Anyone should take heart disease serious; especially women under the age of 65 that have a family history. There are many lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of heart disease. Some of these are exercising 30-60 minutes a day most days of the week, maintaining a healthy weight, stop or do not start smoking, and eat a diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and salt. Other things are taking prescribed medications appropriately like blood pressure meds, blood thinners, and aspirin, managing things like blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes, and taking omega 3 fatty acid supplements. One of the lifestyle changes, as mentioned before, is exercising. Try to get 30-60 minutes every day most days of the week, but it can be split up during the day or be as simple as taking the stairs instead of an elevator or walk/ride a bid to do errands instead of driving. Another thing you can do is situps while watching tv. The next lifestyle change talked about was weight. Healthy body weight differs from person to person, but healthy BMIs help. A BMI of <25 increases the risk. Losing just 10-15 pounds can significantly reduce the risk, however.
Treatment in women is different in the fact that drug treatment (such as clot-busting drugs) may be a better route for them because the plaque is evenly spread along the artery instead of a stent or angioplasty designed to flatten the bulky build ups. Aspirin helps both genders, but in different ways. In women, reduces the risk of stroke more than in men, but in men it reduces the risk of heart attack more. Aspirin can greatly help women if taken daily. It can reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease. Make sure to consult with a doctor before starting that, however.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:34 AM
More women than men die from heart disease each year. Fortunately, women’s risks can take steps to understand their symptoms and reduce their risk. A few of the most common symptoms in women are pain, pressure, or discomfort in the chest. However, it does not have to be severe. In fact, women are more likely to have symptoms unrelated to chest pain; shortness of breath, nausea (vomiting), sweating, lightheadedness (dizziness), and unusual fatigue. In addition to these, women can have small vessel heart disease or micro vascular disease. Women get blockages not only in their main arteries, but in the smaller ones that supply blood to the heart too. Not being familiar with these unique symptoms usually leaves women in the ER after a lot of heart damage has been done. Other heart disease risk factors for women are the obvious high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and obesity, but others are metabolic syndrome (fat around the abdomen, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high triglycerides), mental stress/depression (makes it difficult to maintain a healthy lifestyle and follow treatment), smoking, and low levels of estrogen after menopause (small vessel heart disease). Anyone should take heart disease serious; especially women under the age of 65 that have a family history. There are many lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of heart disease. Some of these are exercising 30-60 minutes a day most days of the week, maintaining a healthy weight, stop or do not start smoking, and eat a diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and salt. Other things are taking prescribed medications appropriately like blood pressure meds, blood thinners, and aspirin, managing things like blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes, and taking omega 3 fatty acid supplements. One of the lifestyle changes, as mentioned before, is exercising. Try to get 30-60 minutes every day most days of the week, but it can be split up during the day or be as simple as taking the stairs instead of an elevator or walk/ride a bid to do errands instead of driving. Another thing you can do is situps while watching tv. The next lifestyle change talked about was weight. Healthy body weight differs from person to person, but healthy BMIs help. A BMI of <25 increases the risk. Losing just 10-15 pounds can significantly reduce the risk, however.
Treatment in women is different in the fact that drug treatment (such as clot-busting drugs) may be a better route for them because the plaque is evenly spread along the artery instead of a stent or angioplasty designed to flatten the bulky build ups. Aspirin helps both genders, but in different ways. In women, reduces the risk of stroke more than in men, but in men it reduces the risk of heart attack more. Aspirin can greatly help women if taken daily. It can reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease. Make sure to consult with a doctor before starting that, however.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

How to Maintain a Healthy Heart

How to Maintain a Healthy Heart | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
How To Maintain A Healthy Heart. The heart is a muscle that pumps blood throughout the body. It allows you to exercise, do regular daily activities and is essential for life. Therefore, maintaining a strong, healthy heart is of the utmost importance.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:28 AM
The heart pumps the blood through a body. It allows you to do your daily activities. Aside from the people with genetic abnormalities or heart defects, many heart problems can be prevented. One of these ways is avoiding cigarettes and tobacco products. Smoking or chewing tobacco can increase your chance of getting heart disease immensely. The nicotine narrows the blood vessels which makes it harder on the heart to pump the blood through the body. Avoiding second-hand smoke is also beneficial in keeping your risk down. Another way is exercise. Exercise at least 5-6 days a week for at least 30-60 minutes. This reduces the risk of heart disease and keeps the heart muscle strong. Jogging, cycling, swimming, and elliptical training help because they are cardiovascular exercises. A third way is limiting the intake of saturated fats and increasing the intake of foods with unsaturated fats. The saturated fats clogs the arteries making it harder on the heart to pump the blood through the body. Examples of foods with this potential are beef, pork, milk, and butter. Examples of unsaturated fats are fish, olive oil, and nuts. Also, fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods are low in total fat and reduce the risk of heart disease. A fourth way is weight. Being overweight can increase the risk, but a loss of 10% of body fat can reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cholesterol which are big risk factors in heart disease. Lastly, consuming vitamin D can even help people with a history of heart disease. People who do not have enough vitamin D are at higher risk. However, this is a fat-soluble vitamin so you can not get rid of any excess so talking with doctor before is a must.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:28 AM
The heart pumps the blood through a body. It allows you to do your daily activities. Aside from the people with genetic abnormalities or heart defects, many heart problems can be prevented. One of these ways is avoiding cigarettes and tobacco products. Smoking or chewing tobacco can increase your chance of getting heart disease immensely. The nicotine narrows the blood vessels which makes it harder on the heart to pump the blood through the body. Avoiding second-hand smoke is also beneficial in keeping your risk down. Another way is exercise. Exercise at least 5-6 days a week for at least 30-60 minutes. This reduces the risk of heart disease and keeps the heart muscle strong. Jogging, cycling, swimming, and elliptical training help because they are cardiovascular exercises. A third way is limiting the intake of saturated fats and increasing the intake of foods with unsaturated fats. The saturated fats clogs the arteries making it harder on the heart to pump the blood through the body. Examples of foods with this potential are beef, pork, milk, and butter. Examples of unsaturated fats are fish, olive oil, and nuts. Also, fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods are low in total fat and reduce the risk of heart disease. A fourth way is weight. Being overweight can increase the risk, but a loss of 10% of body fat can reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cholesterol which are big risk factors in heart disease. Lastly, consuming vitamin D can even help people with a history of heart disease. People who do not have enough vitamin D are at higher risk. However, this is a fat-soluble vitamin so you can not get rid of any excess so talking with doctor before is a must.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Cardiovascular Research Institute

Cardiovascular Research Institute | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 1:39 AM
Cardiovascular disease is the number one health problem in the United States. Each year 950,000 people in the United States die from heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease. In fact, more than half the deaths of women each year are caused by this disease. 600,000 people have strokes each year. Out of this number, 10% fully recover, 31% die, and 60% are disabled. This costs $8 billion each year in the United States. As the number of aging U.S. citizens increases, so does the risk of cardiovascular disease. The need for new treatments and preventative measures is rapidly increasing. The best opportunity for this is at the molecular level. Atherosclerosis and blood clots, which involve the blockage of the arteries, are the most important problems. Thus UCSF researchers are working to identify the genes that predict an individual's risk for atherothrombosis and related conditions such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and type-2 diabetes, to understand how these genes and conditions contribute to disease risk, to develop mechanism-based preventive measures, and to determine if preventive measures are effective. UCSF researchers are also working on identifying the molecules that connect high blood cholesterol to the development of plaques, to determine how to block these molecules, and to determine if this blockade could prevent the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. One culprit molecule includes oxidized components of lipoproteins, which are like the ones on bacteria and therefore cause an inflammatory response in the vessel wall. This explains why it is thought that perhaps a vaccine could be created to prevent atherosclerosis and its progression. Additionally, UCSF reasearchers are working to better understand blood clots and to develop methods to identify patients at risk for heart attacks and strokes so that preventive measures can be taken. In the future, these measures could include drugs to prevent plaque rupture or to prevent formation of blood clots when ruptures occur. There has already been a new class of antithrombotic drugs created and another one will be coming. Another major cause of death is congestive heart failure, caused by the ineffective pumping of the heart. The effects of a heart attack caused by genetic abnormalities are compounded by maladaptive signaling responses that occur when the damaged heart is continually told to pump more. This eventually makes the heart muscle's ability to contract weaker and the heart changes its shape in a way that irreversibly limits pump function. The need here is to understand these signaling mechanisms before this irreversible reshaping takes places. The developmental biology and cardiovascular disease research is a very exciting opportunity. UCSF has one of the largest communities of scientists for this purpose. The cellular processes are beginning to be understood, and many of the genes are being identified. Mutations in these genes cause heart abnormalties in the newborn and rare forms of adult heart disease as well as determine the risk for more common forms of adult disease. All of this information is impacting diagnosis and prevention as well as improving the understanding of developmental and stem cell biology. One day this may allow for the repair of damaged tissues.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:43 AM
to be checked march 4th
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

What is Plaque?

Becky Captain, a cardiac nurse practitioner in preventive cardiology, explains several new insights in plaque development and answers many questions regardin...
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Becky Captain answers the questions "could you explain plaque development?" SHe states that there are new insights on how it develops. They originally thought it grew on the linings of the artery wall and portruded into the artery and stopped blood flow, but we now know that the plaque forms inside the lining of the artery wall before it portrudes into the artery causing the death. It is much like a pimple in the fact that it builds and builds and builds til it pops (which is when the heart attack would occur). Then she goes on to say that aerobic exercise is the only way to control the "ziit" or plaque build up because it builds a thick covering over it to not let it pop. Aerobic exercise helps the smooth muscle fibers to move around and form the cap. The next question she answered was "How do I know if I have plaque build up?" She states she strongly believes to go your health provider and they can do scans that take pictures of the heart to see if there is any build up. Also, if you have had a stent, heart surgery, or androplasty, you have plaque in your arteries.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:43 AM
to be checked march 4th
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:48 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Heart Diseases--Prevention: MedlinePlus

Heart Diseases--Prevention: MedlinePlus | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Heart Diseases--Prevention
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 10:58 AM
This article is all about ways to reduce the risk of getting heart disease like knowing your blood pressure/keeping it under control, exercising daily, not smoking, keeping an eye on diabetes, keeping cholesterol and triclyceride levels under control, eating a lot of fruits and vegetables, and keeping an eye on your weight.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Coronary heart disease - PubMed Health

Coronary heart disease - PubMed Health | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a narrowing of the small blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. CHD is also called coronary artery disease.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 11:09 AM
This article talks about causes, incidents, and risk factors like plaque buildup in arteries and the blood flow being lowered. Then it discusses symptoms like chest pain or wheezinng. Then it goes through tests like coronary angiography and heart CT scans and treatments like lowering blood pressure, HbA1c levels, and LDL cholesterol levels.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Heart Disease Treatment Divya Hridyamrit Vati Controls High Cholesterol

Heart Disease Treatment Divya Hridyamrit Vati Controls High Cholesterol | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Swami ramdev divya hridyamrit vati natural heart care remedy cure all heart problems strengthens compassion and removes arteries blockage of heart and controls high cholesterol; also reduces lipids levels in persons suffering from hyperlipidaemia..
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 11:46 AM
This whole article is about Divya Hriduamrit Vati 40mg. It strenghtens compassion, removes blockages of arteries, reduces levels of lipids, controls high cholesterol, activates the inactive capillaries in the heart, promotes work, removes uneasiness, relieves pain, amd reduces blockages. Then it goes through the ingredients and the therapeutic uses of hridyamrit Vati.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Rescooped by Jamie callihan from Health Supreme
Scoop.it!

Research Uncovers Low Magnesium Is Key Link To Heart Disease

Research Uncovers Low Magnesium Is Key Link To Heart Disease | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it

Researcher reveals that low magnesium levels - not cholesterol or saturated fat intake - are the greatest indicator for all aspects of heart disease.

 

"These numerous studies have found low magnesium to be associated with all known cardiovascular risk factors, such as cholesterol and high blood pressure, arterial plaque build-up (atherogenesis), hardening of the arteries and the calcification of soft tissues. This means we have been chasing our tails all of these years going after cholesterol and the high saturated-fat diet, when the true culprit was and still is low magnesium."


Via Sepp Hasslberger
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:42 AM
second check
Sepp Hasslberger's comment, March 4, 2013 11:07 AM
Hi Jamie, what are you checking for?
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Why Cholesterol May Not Be the Cause Of Heart Disease | Dr. Mark Hyman

Why Cholesterol May Not Be the Cause Of Heart Disease | Dr. Mark Hyman | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 12:14 PM
This article talks about cholesterol. It starts out with saying things that provoke thoughts about cholesterol like if you have LDL but have low HDL statins do not benefit you and 75% of people who have heart attacks have normal cholesterol. The next part of the article tears all the data saying cholesterol is attached to heart disease apart such as the treatment will not help unless done for 5 years and statin does not always help but we lose 28 billion dollars a year to it. The next thing it does is question what we should do then and that is lower our sugar in our diets because that is what helps build up the plaque in our arteries.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:41 AM
second check
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Early Warning Signs of Heart Disease

Early Warning Signs of Heart Disease | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Early Warning Signs Of Heart Disease. According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and is equally divided among men and women.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:24 AM
The American Heart Association states that heart disease is the leading cause of deaeth in the United States, equally affecting men and women. It is the leading cause of death for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and African Americans. The principle type of heart disease is coronary heart disease, also called CHD, coronary artery disease, or CAD. Heart disease has received attention, but the risk factors and warning signs are not always understood. Significant progress has been made, though. The heart pumps over 5 liters of blood a minute throughout the body. The heart relies on a series of coronary arteries for its blood supply. Beginning when a person is twenty, cholesterol begins to accumulate inside the coronary arteries. This robs the heart of its blood supply, and the result is a heart attack. Related to a heart attack is a condition called angina pectoris. Angina often feels like intense chest pressure or shortness of breath and is the first symptom that the heart is not getting enough blood. The general public has become educated about the most common symptoms, such as heaviness in the chest lasing for more than 30 minutes, intense pain running down an arm, and pain between shoulder blades, neck, jaw, or upper back. There can also be a shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, toothache, fatigue, and a sense of impending doom. Symptoms can last for hours or even go away on their own only to return again. In addition to all of these symptoms, women can also experience additional symptoms that are often mistaken for something else. Women's symptoms often come on slower than men's do so urgency is downplayed. Many women wait hours or days before seeking emergency medical attention. Also, women often complain more of the symptoms such as indigestion that are not normally associated with heart disease. It is a good idea to seek immediate medical treatment for any unexplained symptoms, especially if there is heart disease in your family history. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute says that "early diagnosis and treatment saves lives, and delays in reaching medical assistance can be fatal."
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:27 AM
The American Heart Association states that heart disease is the leading cause of deaeth in the United States, equally affecting men and women. It is the leading cause of death for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and African Americans. The principle type of heart disease is coronary heart disease, also called CHD, coronary artery disease, or CAD. Heart disease has received attention, but the risk factors and warning signs are not always understood. Significant progress has been made, though. The heart pumps over 5 liters of blood a minute throughout the body. The heart relies on a series of coronary arteries for its blood supply. Beginning when a person is twenty, cholesterol begins to accumulate inside the coronary arteries. This robs the heart of its blood supply, and the result is a heart attack. Related to a heart attack is a condition called angina pectoris. Angina often feels like intense chest pressure or shortness of breath and is the first symptom that the heart is not getting enough blood. The general public has become educated about the most common symptoms, such as heaviness in the chest lasing for more than 30 minutes, intense pain running down an arm, and pain between shoulder blades, neck, jaw, or upper back. There can also be a shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, lightheadedness, toothache, fatigue, and a sense of impending doom. Symptoms can last for hours or even go away on their own only to return again. In addition to all of these symptoms, women can also experience additional symptoms that are often mistaken for something else. Women's symptoms often come on slower than men's do so urgency is downplayed. Many women wait hours or days before seeking emergency medical attention. Also, women often complain more of the symptoms such as indigestion that are not normally associated with heart disease. It is a good idea to seek immediate medical treatment for any unexplained symptoms, especially if there is heart disease in your family history. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute says that "early diagnosis and treatment saves lives, and delays in reaching medical assistance can be fatal."
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

How to Maintain Heart Health

How to Maintain Heart Health | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
How To Maintain Heart Health. With over a million Americans diagnosed with heart disease each year, health conscious adults are learning how to take responsibility for their health.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 1:58 AM
Over one million Americans are diagnosed with heart disease each year. This is causing more adults to take responsibility for their health. The American Heart Association recommends a combination of diet, exercise, restricting salt intake, stop smoking, and weight management. The first step is to get an annual physical exam with a physician. Many cardiovascular diseases are called "silent killers" so symptoms may not appear. The biggest risks are high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. A physician can doe a health history, physical examination, and blood lipid panel to see if immediate attention is needed. The next step is to assess the foods you eat. The USDA Food Pyramid is a good place to start. There are six classes of food: grains, vegetables, fruits, milk, meats, and beans and oil. The chart can help you balance food choices and serving sizes. A third step is to get more exercise. Adults should get 20 to 30 minutes of aerobic exercise most days of the week. Aerobic exercise uses large muscle groups, such as arms and legs, and can be sustained at a conversational pace, which is when the heart rate is elevated but still low enough to carry on a conversation. Good activites include walking, running, swimming, and biking. The fourth step is to restrict salt intake. Many people who consume a great deal of salt experience high blood pressure. The average American eats between 2,900 mg to 4.300 mg of sodium in one day. The American Heart Association recommends a salt intake of 2,300 mg or less each day. Someone with high blood pressure should only have 1.500 mg each day. The fifth step is to stop smoking. Cigarette smokers inhale carbon monoxide and hundreds of toxic chemicals. This is a risk factor for heart disease. It also lowers the good type of cholesterol while raising the bad type of cholesterol. The American Lung Association provides tips for how to quit smoking. The sixth and final step is the lose weight. Obesity is the number one risk factor for heart disease. One way to determine if you are overweight is find your waist to hip ratio. First measure the circumference of your hips,then measure the circumference of your waist, and finally divide your waist measurement by your hip measurement. Men should have a WHR of less than 0.9. Women should have a WHR of less than 0.7. The best way to lose weight is through a combination of caloric restriction and expenditure by reducing calories taken in while expending calories through aerobic exercise.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

How does coronary artery disease develop?

How does coronary artery disease develop? | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Coronary artery disease - Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute, leader in heart care and heart disease in the United States.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 12:53 AM
Coronary artery disease is the narrowing or blockage of coronary arteries. This is caused by atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of cholesterol and fatty deposits or plaque on the inner wall of the arteries. This buildup restricts blood flow to the heart. Without the right amount of blood flow, the heart becomes starved of oxygen and the necessary nutrients. This can cause angina, which is chest pain. A heart attack may occur when one or more of the coronary arteries are completely blocked. The following is a closer look at the process of coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are shaped like hollow tubes with smooth and elastic walls. The disease starts when you are very young, even before being a teen, when the blood vessel walls begin to show streaks of fat. As you get older, the fat builds up and causes a little bit of injury to the blood vessel walls. To heal these injuries, the walls become stickier. This allows other substances in the blood stream, such as cellular waste and proteins, to stick to the walls. These substances and fat combine to form plaque. With coronary artery disease, the inside of arteries develop plaque deposits that are soft on the inside by with a hard fibrous cap covering the outside. It the hard fibrous cap cracks or tears, the soft, fatty part is exposed. Platelets then come to the area to form a blood clot around the plaque. This narrows the artery even more. Sometimes the blood clot breaks apart and blood supply becomes normal again. Other times, though, the blood clot may totally block the blood supply to the heart. This is called coronary thrombus or occlusion and causes an acute coronary syndrome.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Interview

Q: What is your favorite part about your job?

A:  "Being able to help my patients."

 

Q: What are the hours like?

A: "sometimes endless" [laughs]

            "Can be very long at times"

            "Depends on the week/amount of patients."

 

Q: Is it hard to have a family and be a cardiologist?

A: "No" [laughs]

 

Q: Would you go a different route in your career choice if you knew this is where you       would end up?

A: "I thought I wanted to be a doctor, but I didn't know if I could or if I would really want         to be a doctor if that makes sense." [laughs]

 

Q: How many surgeries do you do a day?

A: "It all depends.  It can be as many as four or five or as few as one."

 

Q: What is the most difficult part about your job?

A: "It can get extremely stressful or extremely sad."

 

Q: What is the worst kind of heart disease you have dealt with? Why?

A: "There are different types and they can all be really bad."

 

Q: What is the most common form of heart disease you deal with?

A: "Bypass surgery or valve replacement or repair is a common surgery.  I am a thoracic     surgeon so I do focus more on the lungs."

 

Q: What do you tell your patients to help them maintain their healthy heart?

A:  "The main one would be to stop smoking and other big ones are to exercise more         often and to take deep breaths."

 

more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 3, 2013 11:30 PM
This is from my interview with Dr. Van Deusen.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Walt Bechtell's comment, March 10, 2013 7:59 PM
Excellent!
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Heart Disease Definition

According to Dr. Agatson, the most common form of heart disease is heart attack. Learn the risk factors for heart disease.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 3, 2013 10:48 PM
Dr. Agatson, in this video, talks about the risk factors. He says the most important one is "not choosing the right parents". It is all genetics and seeing if you have it in your family and if it is at an early age is the most important risk factor. The next ones he talks about are high cholestoral, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, obesity, and the sedentary lifestyle. In the beginning of the video, he gives a good definition of heart disease which i can use to support my frst subtopic.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:44 AM
to be checked march 4th
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

WebMD Heart Disease Health Center – Information About Heart Disease

WebMD Heart Disease Health Center – Information About Heart Disease | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Learn about heart disease symptoms, risk factors and prevention, as well as information on heart attack, heart failure, and heart health.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:39 AM
second check
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:40 AM
second check
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:45 AM
second check
Rescooped by Jamie callihan from The Billy Pulpit
Scoop.it!

Common household chemical linked to heart disease

Common household chemical linked to heart disease | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it

Via CNN:

 

(Health.com) -- A chemical used in the manufacture of common household products -- such as some food packaging, carpets, paint, and nonstick cookware -- may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

 

The chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), is present in trace amounts in up to 98% of Americans. Previous research has linked PFOA exposure to unhealthy cholesterol levels and other risk factors for heart disease, but the potential health hazards posed by the chemical remain largely unknown.

 

In the new study, which included a nationally representative sample of adults, those with the highest levels of PFOA in their blood had double the odds of having a history of heart disease, heart attack, or stroke, compared to adults with the lowest PFOA levels.


The highest PFOA levels also were associated with 78% higher odds of peripheral artery disease, a condition related to heart disease in which the arteries in the limbs narrow and harden.

 

Although these numbers may sound alarming, the researchers say the results should be interpreted with caution. Because the study looked at the relationship between PFOA and heart disease at a single point in time, it doesn't show that PFOA exposure causes -- or even precedes -- heart disease...

 

(click pic to continue reading)


Via Billy Corben
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 11:40 AM
This articles is all about PFOA which is perfluoroctanoic acid and it is in a lot of household items. Studides have shown that the higher levels of acid doubled the odds of heart disease. The rest of the article says more research should be done but there are many ways to get around it like bottled water instead of sink water just to stay safe,
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:39 AM
second check
Brice Gottesman's curator insight, September 19, 2014 2:13 PM

There are so many things linked with heart disease, but what is really the main cause??

Rescooped by Jamie callihan from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Could going veg lower your risk of heart disease?

Could going veg lower your risk of heart disease? | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it

Vegetarians are one-third less likely to be hospitalized or die from heart disease than meat and fish eaters, according to a new UK study.

 

Earlier research has also suggested that non-meat eaters have fewer heart problems, researchers said, but it wasn't clear if other lifestyle differences, including exercise and smoking habits, might also play into that.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 12:02 PM
This articles shows a study of vegetarians verse meat eaters. Vegetarians were less likely to get heart disease due to the fact they had lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure. They said this was probably due to the lack of red meat (especially the meat high in saturated fat) and the fruits and vegetables high in fiber in a vegetarian diet. To reduce the risk of heart disease, ypi do not need to cut out meat all together, but instead just cut back.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:39 AM
second check
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

Calcium Supplements May Raise Men's Death Risk From Heart Disease - MedicineNet

Calcium Supplements May Raise Men's Death Risk From Heart Disease - MedicineNet | Senior research paper- heart disease | Scoop.it
Men taking calcium supplements may be running a nearly 20 percent increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a new study suggests.
more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 12:07 PM
This article is all about how men's death risk from heart disease can be affected with calcium supplements. It starts with a study that showed men taking 1000 mg of calcium supplement increases their risk of dying by 20%,
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:39 AM
second check
Scooped by Jamie callihan
Scoop.it!

YouTube

more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 12:18 PM
this chanel has a lot of videos about the way heart disease works and how to maintain a healthy heart which are two of my subtopics. Two of the videos i will be using off of this are Understanding Heart Disease ( Heart Basics #1) and after you click on that the video Understanding Cholesterol ( Heart Basics #5)
Jamie callihan's comment, March 4, 2013 2:39 AM
second check