Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering
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Concrete, heal thyself!

Concrete, heal thyself! | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
IT’S useful stuff, concrete, but it does have drawbacks. One of the biggest is that it is not as weatherproof as the stone it often substitutes. Salt and ice...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 12:47 PM
This scoop shows the future breakthroughs in the mechanical engineering field and adds to the interesting facts sub topic.
Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 11:03 PM
Also can add to my sub topic of breakthroughs because it has yet to be utilized
Engineering Project's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:00 AM

Jack Cavallaro

Una nueva forma de concreto puede arreglar por sí misma. El hormigón tiene bacterias en su interior que arreglará cualquier grieta que vienen en el concreto. Esto podría crear más seguros puentes y edificios que durarán más tiempo. También recortará gastos en reparaciones a ciertas estructuras así como mantenerlos estructuralmente segura durante períodos prolongados de tiempo. Personas han estado estudiando esta bacteria en una universidad en los países bajos. Un estudio realizado en Corea ha puesto a las bacterias en una etapa de pruebas con concreto y está cerca de desarrollarla en realidad.

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Spaghetti, sand, future engineers and fun

Spaghetti, sand, future engineers and fun | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Roy Thompson, mechanical engineering lab supervisor at Penn State Berks, is the designated sand-pourer at Friday's pasta bridge-building contest at the Spring Township campus. Wilson High School teams also participated ...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 10:58 PM
This scoop can be used to show schools are incorporating fun ways to teach engineering skills and can be used for research
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Photonic Professional GT for Nano-scale 3D Printing > ENGINEERING.com

Photonic Professional GT for Nano-scale 3D Printing > ENGINEERING.com | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it

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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 12:49 PM
The current technology is rapidly evolving as shown in this scoop with the nano sized 3D printer
Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 12:51 PM
also can be used for my topic of interesting facts because this is some newer technology that isn't readily available yet.
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Durham students get a lesson in Popsicle stick engineering

Durham students get a lesson in Popsicle stick engineering | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Eighth annual Durham Popsicle Bridge Building Contest brings youth together Eighth annual Durham Popsicle Bridge Building Contest brings youth together (Popsicle stick engineering today, civil #engineering tomorrow?
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 12:34 PM
This scoop shows how students can learn mechanical engineering in a fun way that isn't too over whelming.
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Mechanical Engineering terminology

Mechanical Engineering terminology | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
A glossary of Mechanical Engineering terms available in English, German, French, Spanish, Russian, Czech, Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian bokmal.

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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:39 PM
I can use this scoop to help define some common terminology used by engineers and to explain what it is that they do.
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The History of Mechanical Engineering - ASME

The History of Mechanical Engineering - ASME | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Learn about the development of Mechanical Engineering from ancient Greece and China to the present day.

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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 11:06 PM
This interesting article would allow me to throw some history into my research and show everyone how engineering first came about
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Apple Seeking An Engineering Manager To Help With Next ...

Apple Seeking An Engineering Manager To Help With Next ... | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
“The Apple TV team is looking for an experienced engineering manager to help deliver the next generation features for Apple TV. Bring your creative energy and engineering discipline, and help us bring the Apple experience ...
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import eagle boards in mechanical CAD drawings

import eagle boards in mechanical CAD drawings | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Usually you use eagle to design your printed circuit boards (PCBs) only in 2 dimensions (when not considering the layers as 3rd layer). This gives you some headaches for narrow space designs like in small cases.

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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:37 PM
I can use this scoop to better my knowledge on how it is a mechanical engineer uses cad to produce designs.
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Visualization Lab | Illustrating How Mechanical Assemblies Work

Visualization Lab | Illustrating How Mechanical Assemblies Work | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it

How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then ...


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Jed Fisher's curator insight, February 20, 2013 5:25 AM

Design | Develop topic. 

This is very similar to the work my team at Right Hemisphere did (now part of SAP). Right Hemisphere was/is great at automatically making very high quality precise Training and Support Documents (for manufacturers). This requires not only tremendous rendering techniques to draw 3D models as technical line illustrations but also requires IQ to figure out what parts are what (screws, gears, significant parts, shells, connectors, etc) and what their purpose is.

This technology can then be used to automatically make support documents like the classical IKEA Product Instructional's and can even be used for more complex products like an automotive engines. It can also be used for automatic assembly and disassembly instructions.

Great research article, found in this month's Siggraph magazine. Thanks for JasonC @BinaryAgentX for the link

Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:34 PM
I can use this scoop to show some of the steps an engineer might go through to produce a design.
Jed Fisher's comment, February 25, 2013 12:55 PM
Absolutely, you really get to see how much work goes into such technical illustrations, it's not as simple as "line drawing", there is a great deal to "explain a story in a glance".
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Inside Wall Street: Underwater engineering services firm Oceaneering rides a ... - MSN Money

Inside Wall Street: Underwater engineering services firm Oceaneering rides a ... - MSN Money | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Inside Wall Street: Underwater engineering services firm Oceaneering rides a ...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:28 PM
I plan to use this scoop in my presentation to discuss some interesting break throughs in the mechanical engineering field.
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Students compete in engineering olympics - RU Daily Targum

Students compete in engineering olympics - RU Daily Targum | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Students compete in engineering olympics
RU Daily Targum
Left, Shuyao Fan, a School of Engineering senior, plays Gavin Tung, right, a School of Engineering senior, in a cup-stacking contest at the N.E.R.D.
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:30 PM
This scoop shows some different approaches to teaching engineering and ways to make it more fun. I can use it for my sub topic, interesting facts.
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College of Engineering makes progress on new building - Virginia Tech Collegiate Times

College of Engineering makes progress on new building - Virginia Tech Collegiate Times | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Virginia Tech Collegiate Times College of Engineering makes progress on new building Virginia Tech Collegiate Times Virginia Tech educates nearly half of all engineers who graduate from colleges and universities in Virginia, and yet the College of...
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Research and Markets: 2013 Worldwide Engineering Services Industry-Industry ... - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com

Research and Markets: 2013 Worldwide Engineering Services Industry-Industry ... - The Herald | HeraldOnline.com | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Research and Markets: 2013 Worldwide Engineering Services Industry-Industry ...
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Interview

Joe DiDomenico's insight:

Dear Joe

 

Take a look at what I provided and see if it fits the bill.  Let me know.

 

Good luck on your senior project

Warren Barkell

 

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Dear Mr. Warren Brakell,

This is Joe DiDomenico and I am currently working on my final project for my senior year of high school. We were asked to include an interview in our research, mine being Mechanical Engineering, I decided to choose a Mechanical Engineer, such as yourself. I am writing this to you to ask if you would be interested in helping me finish my project. I would like to meet in person but because of my work schedule I am unable to meet you, this is the reason why I am asking for an e-mail interview. If you could help me out it would be greatly appreciated to answer the following questions. I know that you are probably very busy, but I ask if you could take a few minutes out of your day to help me out. If you could get back to me at your earliest convenience that would be great.

 

Thank you very much, Joe

 

 

1.) What is it that you undergo on a daily basis as a mechanical engineer?

2.) What kind of schooling did you do and what schools did you attend, also the degrees you needed to become a mechanical engineer?

3.) What do you do at your job, where, how long, why?

4.) What current work are you doing at this moment at your job and are there any types of breakthroughs or new technology there?

 

 

1.) What is it that you undergo on a daily basis as a mechanical engineer?

 

The day can vary for many reasons such as what job you are performing.  If you are working on a design task you start by defining what the requirements and objectives are for the design to accomplish.  You must understand who the customer is and / or who is going to use it.  Got to answer why is it needed, how will it be used, how long should it last, what the costs involved, how it should function, and maybe you might be required to know how to dispose of it when its life is over.  To accomplish this set of task, you on a daily basis will be doing research, analysis, interfacing with people, and writing / communicating.

 

The mechanical engineer works in a team in most cases (but not always), everyone having their own part.  The team can include other mechanicals and other discipline engineers.  Also you have drafting personal, technicians, machinist and sometimes technical writers.  So on a daily basis you could be interfacing and work with others.

 

Usually you have to do some analysis to support your design / task concept.  Being a mechanical engineer you have to use a lot of math and physics to determine how strong a part must be, or how hot the part might get or how the fluid should flow or how fast the part will move or size pumps, motors, gears, etc.  There are tools used such as ANSYS – a finite element analysis (FEA) program for strength calculations, fluid flows, etc.  You have modeling programs such as Pro- Engineer which you build a 3-dimensional (3-D) model of the part or assembly or AutoCAD where you can do 2-D or 3-D model.  For doing calculations by “hand”, a program like MathCAD is a great tool to use.  Many times the engineer will draw a concept to detail and have a draftsman do final to model detailing and make drawings.  You will have to check drawings to make sure they relay what is needed to make the part or assemble parts.  From drawings parts are made by machinist and technicians assemble the models to test and debug. Note many engineers do analysis only.  They do the calculations, create models in programs to analysis and write up the results to support designs or parts under consideration.

 

Mattering on who you work for, writing can be a big part of daily work to detail the work such as the analysis performed, to write instructions on the design for operation and / or repair.  In some case you might have to write proposals to win the work.

 

 

2.) What kind of schooling did you do and what schools did you attend, also the degrees you needed to become a mechanical engineer?

 

The first schooling goal is to obtain the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree from a credited college.  You will receive In this case a BSME.  Many people go this far in their education and follow up with courses to keep current but not leading to any more degrees.  There is always a need to keep up on training which hopefully the employer will assist or provide.

 

I went to Wichita State University (WSU) in Wichita, Kansas.  I went there because I received an athletic scholarship.  I did football, track and Army ROTC and so it took me 5 years to get my BSME.  I served in the Army, take one night school class in managing Research & Development Operations.  I left the Army after 3.5 years and started to work for Westinghouse.  Also I started working on my Master of Science Mechanical Engineering (MSME) which took me 5 years of night school at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU).  I also went to 9 months of night school, a refresher course at Penn State to prepare for the Professional Engineer (PE) exam which I passed. I stayed in the Army Reserves and had to continue the required courses which took another 6 years of night school.  Since I was an Army Engineer, those courses provide training in project management and civil engineering plus military training.

 

3.) What do you do at your job, where, how long, why?

 

I started my present work at Westinghouse R&D Center in 1978.  The group I worked for was called Product Transition Laboratory and we did design work, drawings and produced working models for the different operating divisions of Westinghouse.  Later as Westinghouse began having troubles the work shifted to Government contracts, some of those projects were for the “Star Wars” defense programs.  So this work was mainly design related work.

 

I was transferred to Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory in 1994 after a Government contact was dropped at the now named Science and Technology Center (old R&D Center).   The jobs here are varied from design, testing, writing, modeling and analysis work.  I am still presently working at this location.

 

Why?  I have been fairly lucky overall and have had some good work to do, sometimes, not so good. The pay is good, but note you do not become rich at engineering.  Many go into management to make a little better money.

 

 

4.) What current work are you doing at this moment at your job and are there any types of breakthroughs or new technology there?

 

I am presently working on equipment to be placed in a test nuclear reactor in Idaho. Testing of materials are performed in a radiator field in this reactor. Also some work is performed on the equipment to transport test samples between the reactor and where they are examined. 

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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 10, 2013 9:54 PM
Just received my interview tonight and wow it is full of some great and useful information that will definitely be a huge part of my senior project.
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3D modeling for CNC - repost | 3D Modelling | Engineering | Mechanical Engineering | Product Design | Solidworks

3D modeling for CNC - repost | 3D Modelling | Engineering | Mechanical Engineering | Product Design | Solidworks | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
d. Model will be made using photographic and drawing references and pre-exsisting 2D artwork.
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 11:00 PM
Another scoop about the 3D printers, shows a different way for engineers to render a finished design
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General Electric - Job details

Job Details: (Have #Mobile / Boo exp? Join us as a #Sales Application Engineer in #TX http://t.co/CNTcRuMHa7 #jobs #water #engineering AA/EOE ^HM)
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, March 5, 2013 11:05 PM
This scoop can help to provide information of the types of careers mechanical engineering can offer
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Engineering Videos - Engineering TV: Engineering and technology videos for the electrical and mechanical design engineer.

Engineering Videos - Engineering TV: Engineering and technology videos for the electrical and mechanical design engineer. | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Engineering and technology videos for the electrical and mechanical design engineer.

Via João Greno Brogueira
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Walt Bechtell's comment, February 25, 2013 6:59 PM
Good work. 30/30
Walt Bechtell's comment, February 25, 2013 7:00 PM
Jed Fisher has interview potential!
Eric's curator insight, March 3, 2013 7:32 PM

This is an article on how engineers developed and artifical eye for people who cant see or lost and eye.

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Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Mechanical Engineering Students ...

Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Mechanical Engineering Students ... | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
PITTSBURGH—A team of Carnegie Mellon University mechanical engineering students are among six finalists to compete in a nationwide design competition this week (Jan. 28 - Feb. 1) created by Walt Disney Imagineering ...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:43 PM
This scoop shows how engineering students work together in a design competition to become finalist.
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Careers in Mechanical Engineering

Careers in Mechanical Engineering | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it

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Edison Yau's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:44 PM
Mechanical engineering uses physics, dynamics and structural composition of different machinery as its foundation. The skills to be mastered in this field is on making, operating and maintaining machinery in general. Subspecialty fields of mechanical engineering include aerospace engineering, computer engneering, electrical engineering, bio-engineering, civil engineering and chemical engineering.
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The Cult of Engineering

I’m going to say something controversial: I do not want to write code. I’m eager to learn the basic concepts of computer science, if only for my own curiosity and to understand the how and why of...

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Engineering cells for more efficient biofuel production

Engineering cells for more efficient biofuel production | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
In the search for renewable alternatives to gasoline, heavy alcohols such as isobutanol are promising candidates. Not only do they contain more energy than ethanol, but they are also more compatible with existing ...
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Senior Mechanical Engineer - Career Engineer

Senior Mechanical Engineer Career Engineer The role of Senior Mechanical Engineer will be responsible for the control, production and quality of mechanical design, analysis deliverables and ensuring that all deliverables are issued in accordance...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:36 PM
This scoop will provide information on what it's that a senior mechanical engineer does.
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How Stripe built one of Silicon Valley’s best engineering teams

How Stripe built one of Silicon Valley’s best engineering teams | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Interesting perspective on hiring: http://t.co/GmT1E56Yz7
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Mobile Phone Pioneers Receive Draper Prize, Engineering's Top Honor - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

Mobile Phone Pioneers Receive Draper Prize, Engineering's Top Honor - San Francisco Chronicle (press release) | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Mobile Phone Pioneers Receive Draper Prize, Engineering's Top Honor San Francisco Chronicle (press release) The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) presented the mobile phone pioneers who laid the groundwork for today's smartphone with the Draper...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:33 PM
Some interesting break throughs found in this scoop will help add to my presentation in the sub topic of facts.
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Engineering Day gives potential students first-hand look - The Southern

Engineering Day gives potential students first-hand look - The Southern | Senior Project: Mechanical Engineering | Scoop.it
Engineering Day gives potential students first-hand look The Southern Kyle Mitchell, vice president of the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering, said his group was demonstrating robots it uses in competition to draw...
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Joe DiDomenico's comment, February 25, 2013 12:31 PM
This scoop can help explain what a mechanical engineer might go through on a normal work day.