Senior english lesson ideas
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Creative Teaching Ideas to Handle Talking in Class - Part 1

Creative Teaching Ideas to Handle Talking in Class - Part 1 | Senior english lesson ideas | Scoop.it
Jump start your creative teaching ideas to address talking in class. Understand different causes and set expectations. (Number one behavior issue that new teachers face? Talking in class, how will you deal with that?
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

Via Shona Whyte
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:46 AM

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

Eion_D's curator insight, March 30, 2014 6:44 AM

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

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Alan Kay: A powerful idea about teaching ideas

http://www.ted.com With all the intensity and brilliance he is known for, Alan Kay gives TEDsters a lesson in lessons. Kay has spent years envisioning better...
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How to Write a Literature Review | P Russell | Jorum

How to Write a Literature Review | P Russell | Jorum | Senior english lesson ideas | Scoop.it

This interactive tutorial is aimed at those students involved in critical research and outlines the purpose of a literature review. At the end of the tutorial, students will demonstrate an understanding of how to write a literature review and engage in critical analysis. The tutorial contains quizzes and interactions and the user is given the opportunity to work through the content in a self paced manner.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
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