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Accompagnement des startups : La Corée et le Sénégal signent une convention

Accompagnement des startups : La Corée et le Sénégal signent une convention | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it
Le ministère des Télécommunications et des Postes a signé une convention avec le Centre d’Innovation et d’Economie créative de Corée pour y envoyer des start-ups sénégalaises.
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How Africa Is Challenging Marketing

How Africa Is Challenging Marketing | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it
African consumer markets offer marketers the chance to reinvent the field.

Via Thomas Faltin
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African Storybook Project brings digital books to kids

African Storybook Project brings digital books to kids | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it

The African Storybook Project’s goal is to boost early literacy levels in Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, and other countries.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 1:41 AM

Bonny Norton, research advisor for the African Storybook Project, told the Georgia Straight the “innovative” initiative’s goal is to boost early literacy levels in Kenya, South Africa, Uganda, and other countries.

“This is one of the greatest challenges in Africa,” Norton said by phone from her Vancouver home. “There are very few resources to become literate in the mother tongue.”

Earlier this month, the project’s website launched with 120 different stories in 20 languages, including Lugbarati, Kiswahili, and Kikamba. All of the digital books are published in English and at least one African language and made freely available under Creative Commons licences.

According to Norton, teachers and librarians in Africa download the books to computers and project them on walls for children to read. The project’s site also allows people from all over the world to read, create, and translate books.

“It’s also about ownership,” Norton said. “It’s not just stories that have come from England or stories that have come from the U.S. and Canada but Africans are constructing their own stories, writing their own stories, and uploading these stories that can be shared across Africa.”

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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 29, 2015 4:24 PM

The lingering effects of colonialism, so strongly relevant in every aspect of African ways of life, are perhaps most evident in the "lingua franca" of African nations today. With a multitude of different ethnicities and languages in use in every African nation today, the result of the arbitrarily drawn national borders made by European colonizers, necessitates the use of the one language that's commonly spoken across every independent nation- a European tongue. This system, while a necessity in today's world, is a solution that no one is quite happy with. It reminds Africans of all ages of the power still held by their colonizers over their everyday lives, a stark reminder of the horrors of the previous century at every business meeting and every exchange of goods. This harms the national psyche of each nation, as well as undermining the importance and pride Africans deservedly maintain in their own native languages. European-made borders, however, make it difficult to find another, native language that every ethnic group can agree upon. As a result, the European languages are still in use in Africa, and will most likely still be in use for some time to come. It's a system that no one likes but, for the time being, everyone must accept as reality.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:26 AM

This map is a great resource in showing the diversity of language in Africa. Of course, this map discounts the many native African languages. It instead focuses on the language of business in the continent. That language, has been influence by the European colonization of Africa. The chosen language of business is often tied to the colonizer of the region. The diversity of language in Africa is staggering to say the least.  

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Un éditeur sénégalais participe à la coédition du livre de Lilian Thuram - Le Soleil

Un éditeur sénégalais participe à la coédition du livre de Lilian Thuram - Le Soleil | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it
Un éditeur sénégalais participe à la coédition du livre de Lilian Thuram Le Soleil Livre La maison d'édition Papyrus Afrique, basée à Dakar, prendra part à la prochaine coédition de "Mes étoiles noires : De Lucy à Barack Obama", un livre de Lilian...

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The Top Ten places to visit in Africa

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it
Africa has a lot to offer the adventurous traveller. We've compiled a list of the must-see places any trip should include.

Via Seth Dixon
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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 11:00 PM

 Even though their is a bad situation going on in some parts of Africa, we can not discount the beautiful places  in this beautiful continent. I really love the ten places, but there was three places which I will love to go some day. The first one is Victoria Falls in Zambia is a beautiful place I love it, its looks like The Niagara falls but much better. The second one is Valley of the kings in Egypt, this place is an ancient place, very interesting. The last one is Cape Town in South Africa, this is an amazing place, it have beautiful beaches, the nature in there is awesome, and I could read that has great cuisine. Definitely is in my plans to go someday.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:37 PM

I have never been outside of the country. Although I would really love to visit a country in each continent before I die. Being a huge Disney fan, all that comes to mind when I think of Africa is The Lion King. However, the top places ranked on this website were just as beautiful. A must see for me would be The Maasai Mara located in Kenya. It looks like a replica of the opening scene in The Lion King. Another beautiful sight to see would be Mount Kilimanjaro. I'm not sure I would make it to the top, but even seeing it from a distance looks like a breath-taking view. Number one on this top places to visit list was Cape Town, which consisted of beaches, food, and amazing scenery. Sounds perfect for a relaxing day!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:11 PM

I liked this article because a lot of times, many indivduals do not realize that there are many great places to visit in Africa. Africa has a big stereotype of just having poor countries and not having much to see visually. This articles shows the top ten places to see if you travel there and these images are beyong beautiful. If you like to travel this is definetly something that you should look at. Geographically, there are mountains. rain foreswt, craters, pyramids, and towns you can visit. Africa is a big continent and one of my favorite images that I saw was Mt. Kilimanjaro and Virunga Mountains.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | 221 and Cie | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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Sénégal: A vos cartes, prêts, sanctionnez - Makaila - OverBlog

L'ivresse du pouvoir a certainement conduit la dynastie Faye-Sall-Gassama à croire qu'elle a la possibilité de faire du Sénégal un gâteau à partager. De Saint-Louis en passant par Rufisque, Pikine, Guédiawaye et Grand Yoff ...
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