Semantic Gnosis Web
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Avatarpoint Security

Avatarpoint Security | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

The Importance of A Security Incident Response Team (SIRT)


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Semantic Gnosis Web
Ariadne's invisible wire in the web maze
Curated by Jan Bergmans
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Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center

Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.
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Google: Today’s Encryption May Not Survive Tomorrow’s Attacks

It is ‘deja vu’ all over again as Google prepares for a future that seems inevitable. Like the millennium bug of the late 90s, Practical Quantum Computing looks like the next big turn in this era of internet security and encryption.
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Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey & Company

Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey & Company | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

The technical potential for automation differs dramatically across sectors and activities.


As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines? In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. Automation, now going beyond routine manufacturing activities, has the potential, as least with regard to its technical feasibility, to transform sectors such as healthcare and finance, which involve a substantial share of knowledge work. From science fiction to business fact Video From science fiction to business fact McKinsey’s Michael Chui explains how automation is transforming work. These conclusions rest on our detailed analysis of 2,000-plus work activities for more than 800 occupations. Using data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics and O*Net, we’ve quantified both the amount of time spent on these activities across the economy of the United States and the technical feasibility of automating each of them. The full results, forthcoming in early 2017, will include several other countries,1 but we released some initial findings late last year and are following up now with additional interim results. Last year, we showed that currently demonstrated technologies could automate 45 percent of the activities people are paid to perform and that about 60 percent of all occupations could see 30 percent or more of their constituent activities automated, again with technologies available today. In this article, we examine the technical feasibility, using currently demonstrated technologies, of automating three groups of occupational activities: those that are highly susceptible, less susceptible, and least susceptible to automation. Within each category, we discuss the sectors and occupations where robots and other machines are most—and least—likely to serve as substitutes in activities humans currently perform. Toward the end of this article, we discuss how evolving technologies, such as natural-language generation, could change the outlook, as well as some implications for senior executives who lead increasingly automated enterprises. Understanding automation potential In discussing automation, we refer to the potential that a given activity could be automated by adopting currently demonstrated technologies, that is to say, whether or not the automation of that activity is technically feasible.2 Each whole occupation is made up of multiple types of activities, each with varying degrees of technical feasibility. Exhibit 1 lists seven top-level groupings of activities we have identified. Occupations in retailing, for example, involve activities such as collecting or processing data, interacting with customers, and setting up merchandise displays (which we classify as physical movement in a predictable environment). Since all of these constituent activities have a different automation potential, we arrive at an overall estimate for the sector by examining the time workers spend on each of them during the workweek. Exhibit 1 Technical feasibility is a necessary precondition for automation, but not a complete predictor that an activity will be automated. A second factor to consider is the cost of developing and deploying both the hardware and the software for automation. The cost of labor and related supply-and-demand dynamics represent a third factor: if workers are in abundant supply and significantly less expensive than automation, this could be a decisive argument against it. A fourth factor to consider is the benefits beyond labor substitution, including higher levels of output, better quality, and fewer errors. These are often larger than those of reducing labor costs. Regulatory and social-acceptance issues, such as the degree to which machines are acceptable in any particular setting, must also be weighed. A robot may, in theory, be able to replace some of the functions of a nurse, for example. But for now, the prospect that this might actually happen in a highly visible way could prove unpalatable for many patients, who expect human contact. The potential for automation to take hold in a sector or occupation reflects a subtle interplay between these factors and the trade-offs among them. Even when machines do take over some human activities in an occupation, this does not necessarily spell the end of the jobs in that line of work. On the contrary, their number at times increases in occupations that have been partly automated, because overall demand for their remaining activities has continued to grow. For example, the large-scale deployment of bar-code scanners and associated point-of-sale systems in the United States in the 1980s reduced labor costs per store by an estimated 4.5 percent and the cost of the groceries consumers bought by 1.4 percent.3 It also enabled a number of innovations, including increased promotions. But cashiers were still needed; in fact, their employment grew at an average rate of more than 2 percent between 1980 and 2013.

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So Hey You Should Stop Using Texts for Two-Factor Authentication

So Hey You Should Stop Using Texts for Two-Factor Authentication | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
A string of recent SMS hacks means security-conscious users should switch to a more secure login system.
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How the ‘insecurity of things’ creates the next wave of security opportunities

How the ‘insecurity of things’ creates the next wave of security opportunities | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Data from an HP IoT study shows that 80 percent of IoT devices failed to require passwords of sufficient complexity and length. As much as 70 percent of the devices did not encrypt communications. And 60 percent of these devices raised security concerns with their user interfaces. In an OpenDNS IoT study, 23 percent of respondents said they have no mitigating controls to prevent unauthorized device access in their company’s networks.

In an IoT security study conducted by Yokohama National University, researchers created an IoT honey pot, or an IoTPOT, to attract the bears. They found that Telnet-based attacks on IoT devices have rocketed since 2014. Telnet is a communication protocol that has no encryption or authentication. All data is transmitted in plain text. Yet a large number of industrial and scientific devices have only Telnet as a communication option.

Secure Shell protocol, or SSH, is a better option, but it increases bandwidth overload. And worse, some IoT devices cannot be configured to SSH, unless the interface appliance can be re-configured. With 70 percent of devices communicating in plain text, breaking in becomes easy.

New malware is being developed to target IoT.
Katsunari Yoshioka, who conducted the IoTPOT study, says, “Using an over-30-year-old insecure remote access service like Telnet for global access is technically simple and easy to fix. But the mass infections shows how many manufacturers do not really care, or do not know how to secure their products.”

Once hackers gain access to devices, the next step is infection of the device; the last step is monetization. Five distinct DDoS malware families targeting Telnet-enabled IoT devices have been invented. Your DVR has already being hacked and used as a botnet — you just don’t know it!

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North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News

North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Cities that want to make the move to open source should take the following steps:

1. Look for upcoming end-of-life or expiry of existing proprietary licenses as an opportunity to migrate away from them to something less expensive.

2. Look at the subscription model of some critical open source software as a way to move necessary purchases to an operating expense budget as opposed to a capital expenditure budget and eliminate large budget outlays for new or renewed proprietary software.

3. Prepare a reasonable transition plan that will accommodate any training and adjustment of staff to new applications.

4. Ensure when budgeting that the total cost of ownership is considered over the lifespan of the project and not just the upfront initial costs.

5. Use software that will allow IT to run both Windows and open source software side by side during the transition period.

6. Find the political willpower to get it done. This will require action by elected officials, but it may need leadership from IT to show them what can be done.

The move to open source is inevitable as open source communities of developers continue to work on thousands of applications and as more software development companies invest in an open source model to allow for greater flexibility and lower end user prices than existing proprietary competitors. Europe has more than a decade head start on North American cities. The quality of available open source software has improved so much in that decade that the transition can be far easier for cities starting now, than it was for Munich when they got the ball rolling in Europe.

Kevin Gallagher is CEO of Inuvika Inc., a Toronto based open source company that delivers application virtualization software. www.inuvika.com

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Khan Academy

Khan Academy | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Learn for free about math, art, computer programming, economics, physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, finance, history, and more. Khan Academy is a nonprofit with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.
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​Tor Is Teaming Up With Researchers To Protect Users From FBI Hacking

​Tor Is Teaming Up With Researchers To Protect Users From FBI Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
security, anonymity, Tor Browser, hacking, privacy, Selfrando, FBI, law enforcement, power, encryption, machines

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Public consultation on the role of publishers in the copyright value chain and on the 'panorama exception' –

Public consultation on the role of publishers in the copyright value chain and on the 'panorama exception' – | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
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It isn't just the DMCA that is broken beyond repair: Copyright Office refuses FSF comments | Defective by Design

It isn't just the DMCA that is broken beyond repair: Copyright Office refuses FSF comments | Defective by Design | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
As we wrote back in February, submitting comments to the Copyright Office requires the use of proprietary JavaScript. No one should be required to use proprietary software simply to communicate with their government. But the Copyright Office would not offer any other means of submitting comments digitally. So we delivered the signed comment in person. But the Copyright Office has refused to accept the comment as delivered.

This is an unjust outcome for what we all hoped would be an opportunity to help the Copyright Office fix the broken anti-circumvention system. But while the Copyright Office refuses to listen, there are others who will. You've done so much already to help our voice be heard, can you help us finish the job? Here's what you can do to help:

If you microblog, please share the following message (or your own) with the hashtag #endDRM. We strongly suggest that if you use Twitter, you do it in a way that avoids using proprietary software:

The DMCA's anti-circumvention rules are broken beyond repair, the time to end Digital Restrictions Management is now. #endDRM https://u.fsf.org/1rq

Share this post with your friends and colleagues to help spread the word.
Support our fight to end DRM by making a donation

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HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent - Blog | add0n.com

HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent - Blog | add0n.com | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent The word fingerprinting comes from the forensic analysis of a human hand. These fingerprints are considered markers of human identity as they’re not easy to alter and are durable over the lifetime of an individual. These characteristics make them suitable markers for human identity. In similar fashion, our computers and multimedia devices can be identified and tracked by websites we access on these devices.

A Glimpse of Technology
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Hardly Anyone Trusts The Media Anymore — Medium

Hardly Anyone Trusts The Media Anymore — Medium | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Only 6 percent of people say they have a great deal of confidence in the press, about the same level of trust Americans have in Congress, according to a new survey released on Sunday.

The study mirrors past reports that found the public’s trust in mass media has reached historic lows, according to data gathered by the Media Insight Project, a partnership between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute. The report found faith in the press was just slightly higher than the 4 percent of people who said they trusted Congress.

Alongside the dire findings, the report found respondents valued accuracy above all else, with 85 percent of people saying it was extremely important to avoid errors in coverage. Timeliness and clarity followed closely, with 76 percent and 72 percent respectively saying those attributes were imperative among media sources.

“Over the last two decades, research shows the public has grown increasingly skeptical of the news industry,” the report reads. “The study reaffirms that consumers do value broad concepts of trust like fairness, balance, accuracy, and completeness. At least two-thirds of Americans cite each of these four general principles as very important to them.”

Ironically, despite news organizations’ ongoing battle to master social media platforms, that trust doesn’t extend to the likes of Facebook and Twitter. The report found just 12 percent of people trust media delivered via Mark Zuckerberg’s evolving juggernaut, even though 87 percent of people get news from Facebook.

LinkedIn, in fact, garnered the most faith over competitors like Instagram and Reddit, with 23 percent or people finding links from the site trustworthy.

The Associated Press notes the news media has been embattled by a series of high profile missteps, particularly Rolling Stone’s retracted report about a rape at a fraternity at the University of Virginia.

The media has also faced a barrage of criticism during the ongoing presidential campaign season, particularly from Republican leaders including Donald Trump and Ted Cruz. Trump has launched repeated attacks against Fox News’ Megyn Kelly (culminating in a reported “clearing of the air” last week), while Cruz has lambasted the press for being too hostile.

You can take a look at the full results here.
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Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance

Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Bulgarian Parliament has passed amendments to its Electronic Governance Act which require all software written for the government to be open source.
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Emotional Education: An Introduction

Emotional Education: An Introduction | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
That we think so well of untrained intuition is because (without realising it) we are the inheritors of what can be summed up as a Romantic view of emotions. Starting in Europe in the 18th century and spreading widely and powerfully ever since, Romanticism is a movement of ideas that has been deeply committed to letting our emotions play a large and untampered role in our lives. Instead of nuancing or educating them (as earlier, Classical theories recommended), Romanticism has suggested that we learn to surrender to emotions with confidence and trust that they have much to teach us in their raw, untrammelled forms. If we feel joyful we shouldn’t necessarily try to analyse why. Reason can harm or distort feeling. If we are sad, we shouldn’t seek to moderate our passions. Anger should be vented, not bottled up; you should tell other people how you feel, without worrying about the consequences of emotional honesty. When choosing whom to love, you should be guided by instinct; it is the best way to choose a partner. Being true to feelings is, Romanticism insists, always a virtue. Romanticism was a deeply well-intentioned movement, but it has had some extremely tricky consequences, because attempting to navigate our emotional lives by intuition alone has to it some of the recklessness of trying to land a plane or perform a surgical operation without training. Our emotions, if left unexamined and unschooled, are liable to lead us into some profoundly counter-productive situations in regard to our love choices, our careers, our friendships and the management of our own moods. The task before us is therefore how we might acquire a set of emotional skills that could reliably contribute to a capacity for ‘emotional intelligence’. The term sounds odd. We are used to referring to intelligence without necessarily unpicking the many varieties of it a person might possess – and therefore do not tend to highlight the value of a very distinctive sort of intelligence which currently does not enjoy the prestige it should. Every sort of intelligence signals an ability to navigate well around a particular set of challenges: mathematical, linguistic, technical, commercial and so on… When we say that someone is clever but add that they have made a mess of their personal lives; or that they have acquired an astonishing amount of money but are very tricky to work with, we are pointing to a deficit in what deserves to be called emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the quality that enables us to negotiate with patience, insight and temperance the central problems in our relationships with others and with ourselves. It shows up around partnerships in a sensitivity to the moods of others, in a readiness to grasp what may be going on for them beyond the surface and to enter imaginatively into their point of view. It shows up in regard to ourselves when it comes to dealing with anger, envy, anxiety and professional confusion. And emotional intelligence is what distinguishes those who are crushed by failure from those who know how to greet the troubles of existence with a melancholy and at points darkly humorous resilience. At various points in the past, there have been forces at work which hoped to teach us emotional skills in systematic ways. They didn’t always do the job ideally well – but they did keep the general idea on the agenda. It is noteworthy that none of these forces are currently very powerful in our lives today. The first of these forces was religion. At their best religions sought to retrain, and improve, the quality of our customary emotional responses. In his Second Letter to the Corinthians, St Paul (the decisive figure in the development of all the Christian churches) sought to teach people to be ‘Slow to anger and quick to forgive’. The project was based on the wise assumption that better emotions are by nature highly teachable and that we are, of course, usually swift to fury and extremely stubborn about forgiving. Yet St Paul knew there might be another way – and believed that a retraining programme could belong to one of the central ambitions of his new religion. Therefore, for centuries, week by week, congregations were asked to reflect very seriously on their own failings to be humble rather than proud; to feel pity and tenderness in directions they normally wouldn’t consider and to refocus feelings of admiration away from worldly success and towards sacrifice and renunciation. The point isn’t to insist that churches were always successful at or ideally focused on emotional education – but to highlight that they were peculiarly and inspiringly devoted to trying. The capacity for churches to keep up this project has now badly withered. Religion may still be a major force in the world but it suffers from the insurmountable drawback that it is perceived as being built upon incredible suppositions; it simply feels too strange to a great many sensible people to believe that a cosmic deity might be in control of the destiny of human beings and yet, for reasons we are not equipped to fully comprehend, would allow the world to roll on in endless, grotesque suffering. However nice some aspects of its emotional education programme might be, religion cannot now be a force suited to conveying it. When religion first declined in the West in the 19th century, a widespread assumption was that universities could take up some of the slack. Culture could replace scripture. But these hopes too have been conclusively betrayed. A range of academic subjects – philosophy, history, literature – are in principle highly connected to the task of educating our emotional lives; they capture the course of human experience in all its complexities – and the leading universities have often been hugely well resourced and housed in majestic settings. From the outside they have looked like places that would have the authority and the opportunity to help individuals and even whole societies becomes emotionally wise. But, this grand promise has been tragically undercut (or, more bluntly, betrayed) by an academic obsession with abstraction and obscurity. If an individual turned up at one of the great universities frankly asking for help, they would be regarded as deranged and forcibly removed. A similar betrayal has happened around art museums. Here too the hope was that these could take over some of the tasks of religion: that museums could become our new cathedrals. The great galleries of the world may sometimes look the part, but close up they harbour no comparable ambitions to guide and elevate us. Cathedrals were intended to provide very specific courses in emotional education and guidance, taking us in ordered stages through a process of training leading to a specific and admired conclusion. No such ambitions attend galleries. One would be equally unwise to show up in sorrow at a museum asking for help in knowing how to live and die well. The idea of emotional education therefore remains at once deeply relevant and widely neglected. The challenge before us is to break down emotional intelligence into a range of skills, a curriculum of emotional skills, that are at work in wise and temperate lives. We should be ready to embark on a systematic educational programme in an area that has for too long, unfairly and painfully, seemed like a realm of intuition and luck.
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The Next Office Is Outside

The Next Office Is Outside | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Who says going to work has to mean sitting at a cubicle all day? Coming this summer Popices will be setting up outdoor offices all across Amsterdam.
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US Customs wants to collect social media account names at the border

US Customs wants to collect social media account names at the border | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Your Twitter handle may soon be part of the US visa process. Yesterday, US Customs and Border Protection entered a new proposal into the federal register, suggesting a new field in which persons entering the country can declare their various social media accounts and screen names. The information wouldn’t be mandatory, but the proposed field would still provide customs officials with an unprecedented window into the online life of travelers. The process already includes fingerprinting, an in-person interview, and numerous database checks.

The proposal focuses on arrival / departure forms commonly collected from non-citizens at the US border, as well as the electronic form used for anyone entering the country under a visa waiver. Under the proposed changes, those forms would include a new optional data field prompting visitors to "please enter information associated with your online presence," followed by open fields for specific platforms and screen names.

It’s unclear from the proposal how thoroughly officials will examine the social profiles, although it’s clear they will be used for investigative purposes. "Collecting social media data will enhance the existing investigative process and provide DHS greater clarity and visibility to possible nefarious activity and connections," the announcement reads.

The public has 60 days to comment on the new proposal before it will be formally considered. Comments can be mailed to Customs and Border Protection at its Washington office.

Immigration and intelligence agencies have been under increasing pressure to scrutinize social media profiles after the San Bernardino shooting in December of last year. One of the attackers had posted a public announcement on Facebook during the shooting, and had previously sent private Facebook messages to friends discussing violent attacks. Crucially, the private messages were sent before receiving her visa. That news provoked some criticism, although investigators would have needed significantly more than a screen name to see the messages. State Department officials claimed to be reviewing the visa application processes in the wake of the attacks.

VIATHE HILL JOSEPH LORENZO HALL (TWITTER)
SOURCEFEDERAL REGISTER
RELATED ITEMS SOCIAL MEDIA HOMELAND SECURITY
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The Muse raises $16 million for its next-gen career site

The Muse raises $16 million for its next-gen career site | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Muse, a New York-based career site that offers job opportunities, skill-building courses, coaching, and video profiles meant to show what it’s like to work at different companies, has raised $16 million in Series B funding led by Icon Ventures. Earlier backers Aspect Ventures, DBL Partners and QED Investors also joined the round, which brings funding for the 4.5-year-old startup to $28.7 million.

Co-founder and CEO Kathryn Minshew says the platform’s users are largely women — 65 percent of them, in fact — with 50 percent of users below age 30, another quarter of them in their 30s, and the rest age 40 and over. That’s apparently been good for business. “When women find The Muse,” says Minshew, “they’ll come back and tell us, ‘We told 15 people,'” about the platform.

What’s also good for business is LinkedIn’s announced sale last week to Microsoft for a stunning $26.2 billion, says Minshew. We talked yesterday about why the acquisition bodes well for The Muse, as well as what the company is building right now that could double its size.
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Transgender man bevalt van dochter

Transgender man bevalt van dochter | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
In IJsland is een 19-jarige transgender man bevallen van een meisje. Kort nadat hij besloot om door het leven te gaan als man, ontdekte hij da
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Future Of Hacking

Future Of Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Internet we know today is only one possible interpretation of the original vision of an open, peer-to-peer network. Think of it as a first-generation Internet, built on a fragile global network of vulnerable codes subject to abuse and even collapse. This Internet is failing from too close an encounter with a triple shock: a…
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The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards

The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards
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The Vice President for the Digital Single Market on the European Commission, former Communist Andrus Ansip, is behind the next European Union (EU) raid on personal freedoms, promoting the idea of using national ID cards to log in to online services. Leaked documents from within the European Commission revealed a call for the roll out of a more extensive use of national ID cards across the EU. The documents have since been uploaded to the Commission’s own website. Mr. Ansip is from Estonia, a small Baltic country and former Communist state which has the most highly-developed national ID card system in the world. The Estonian state website boasts: “Much more than simply a legal picture ID, the mandatory national card serves as the digital access card for all of Estonia’s secure e-services.” The paper outlines that: “In particular, online platforms need to accept credentials issued or recognised by national public authorities, such as electronic ID cards, citizens cards, bank cards or mobile IDs… for every consumer to have a multitude of username and password combinations is not only inconvenient but becomes a security risk.” This draft document entitled ‘Online Platforms and the Digital Single Market’ is dated 25 May this year, and urges the log in policy on the basis that fake user reviews are misleading European consumers. The document states: “Online ratings and reviews of goods and services are helpful and empowering to consumers, but they need to be trustworthy and free from any bias or manipulation. A prominent example is fake reviews, where loss of trust can undermine the business model of the platform itself, but also lead to a wider loss of trust, as expressed in many responses to the public consultation Breitbart London has previously reported on how the European Union plans to roll out a continent-wide ID card, with a view to using the data to impose Europe-wide taxes, and an EU-wide minimum wage, further bypassing elected national parliaments and handing more power to the unelected bureaucrats in Brussels. The European Commission website further reveals that “on 1 July 2016, the new rules on trust services under the eIDAS Regulation will come into effect in the 28 EU Member States repealing the 15-year-old eSignature Directive and modernising the legal framework for trust services. This will be a turning point in the eIDAS journey and another big milestone towards a Digital Single Market.” It does not appear to be mandatory, but uptake of national E-ID cards is encouraged by the Commission as the direction of travel for access to e-services. It does, however, define and regulate the legal basis for digital IDs for Europeans. “This intrusive and seemingly authoritarian EU interference in social media and the internet is not new,” said Diane James, a Member of the European Parliament and the UK Independence Party’s spokesman for Home Affairs. “In 2013, the European Parliament spent almost £2 million on press monitoring and trawling Eurosceptic debates on the internet for “trolls” during euro-elections amid fears that hostility to the EU was growing.
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How to Tell a Compelling Story with Data - 6 Rules & 6 Tools

How to Tell a Compelling Story with Data - 6 Rules & 6 Tools | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The way a message is communicated is almost as important as the message itself. Our world is moving towards a more data-oriented approach to decision making i…
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British spies have been hacking themselves and their own families so they can send birthday cards

British spies have been hacking themselves and their own families so they can send birthday cards | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
23 show all

The files show the huge amount of information that is being gathered by British spying groups. Ministers have previously argued that only people who are suspected of criminal or terrorist behaviour will be tracked – but they show that spies have been collecting bulk personal datasets on a range of innocent people for years, and arguing that they are used to find legitimate suspects.

The papers show how that same information has been used by spies to find out personal information, like looking up people’s addresses to send birthday cards.

“We’ve seen a few instances recently of individual users crossing the line with their database use, looking up addresses in order to send birthday cards, checking passport details to organise personal travel, checking details of family members for personal reasons. Another area of concern is the use of the database as a ‘convenient’ way to check the personal details of colleagues when filling out service forms on their behalf.
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Britain’s spy agency GCHQ worked to expose Harry Potter leaks

The papers also show how the organisation had to explicitly tell spies not to search for themselves within the database – a practice that can often lead to accidental intrusion into other people’s lives.
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How Technology Helps Creditors Control Debtors

How Technology Helps Creditors Control Debtors | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
From software that records your every keystroke, to GPS tracking, to ignition kill switches—lenders have more power over their customers than ever.
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Detective Mode was an extreme invasion of privacy, a mustache-twirling moment of villainy in the history of commercial surveillance. But the excesses of Detective Mode are just particularly unsavory examples of an increasingly prevalent trend in credit transactions—remote control of devices by lenders, that infringes on the privacy and security of the debtors. While few lenders will go as far as to take naked pictures of their debtors, wherever there is an expensive device that can be easily absconded with, it makes sense for lenders to add both a kill switch and GPS. A New York Times story in 2014 looked at the increasing prevalence of starter interrupt devices—kill switches—in cars financed by subprime loans, reporting that the mechanisms had “reduced late payments to roughly 7 percent from nearly 29 percent.” Lenders aren’t installing these devices because they’re interested in tracking their debtors’ every move; starter interrupt mechanisms are just an economical way to protect their investments. But even when lenders aren’t stooping to the kinds of skin-crawling extremes that warrant a FTC lawsuit, there’s something about these controls that feels dangerous and invasive. In the same 2014 report, the Times described how a woman in Austin, Texas, had fled her abusive husband, only to be tracked down by the subprime lender that had financed her car. By driving to the shelter, she had violated the loan agreement, which restricted her from driving outside of a four county radius. She was tracked down via GPS and her car was repossessed. A rootkit is malicious software that enables unauthorized access to a computer, while masking its own existence from the authorized user. We owe this proliferation of lender kill switches to the convergence of two trends. One is the uptick in subprime lending, a phenomenon that received a great deal of attention during the 2008 home mortgage crisis, but less so when it came to movable property like cars and computers. And while subprime lending in the housing market has fallen off since the 2008 crisis, it has rebounded in other types of loans—auto loans, credit cards, personal loans. Alongside this rise in subprime consumer lending, there has been a steady increase in the use of access controls in devices. What began with digital rights management for intellectual property has expanded into ever-stranger forms, like access controls for Keurig pods and self-cleaning cat litterboxes. Mechanisms that prevent Keurig machines from using off-label coffee pods are annoying but relatively harmless. But the history of digital rights management (DRM) has always had a dark side. In 2005, security researchers found that the DRM protection on Sony BMG music CDs would install a rootkit if the CD were inserted into a user’s computer. A rootkit is malicious software that enables unauthorized access to a computer, while masking its own existence from the authorized user. It’s a tool for hackers, thieves, and nation-state adversaries. In the quest for perfect protection of Sony’s intellectual property, the company threw the privacy and security of their customers under the bus. The Sony BMG rootkit incident was the first scandal of its kind, but it wouldn’t be the last. In 2014, several outlets reported that Adobe’s ebook reader was tracking readers’ habits and transmitting back unencrypted logs of those activities. It seemed as though wherever DRM went, privacy invasion followed. The average user owns very little of the digital world they inhabit. DRM is intended to protect revenues from copyright infringement. But it doesn’t do just that, it transforms the relationship between consumers and software developers. Ebooks, video games, software, and other digital goods are increasingly distributed under licenses, rather than sold as outright property. (And although some files, like music, aren’t sold as licenses, they can’t be resold on a secondary market like regular property either.) The law, working in tandem with DRM, shrank the very concept of ownership, allowing companies to force end-users into renter relationships. The average user owns very little of the digital world they inhabit. Today, companies like
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Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!

VoCore: Mini Linux Computer, Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!
Jan Bergmans's insight:
DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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Jan Bergmans's curator insight, April 18, 5:33 AM
DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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GAGGED: Brussels tells Dutch MPs they CAN'T debate referendum result as it may fuel Brexit

GAGGED: Brussels tells Dutch MPs they CAN'T debate referendum result as it may fuel Brexit | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The European elite have gagged elected politicians in the Netherlands, ordering them to suppress the Dutch people's democratic voice until after our own referendum is done and dusted on June 23.

In an astonishing statement delivered to the Dutch parliament this week Prime Minister Mark Rutte admitted he had been ordered by other EU leaders not to mention the referendum for the next two months.
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