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Improving protein coreference resolution by simple semantic classification

Improving protein coreference resolution by simple semantic classification | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Improving protein coreference resolution by simple semantic classification - up-to-the-minute news and headlines. 7thSpace is a online portal covering topics such as Family, Business, Entertainment, Headlines, Recipes and more.
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Semantic Gnosis Web
Ariadne's invisible wire in the web maze
Curated by Jan Bergmans
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Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center

Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.
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Netherlands: What is Bitcoin? We Don't Really Know - CryptoCoinsNews

Netherlands: What is Bitcoin? We Don't Really Know - CryptoCoinsNews | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The learning curve for Bitcoin is higher for some than it is for others. As I reported previously, Great Britain has seen knowledge of Bitcoin more than double since June of 2013, to over 70%.
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Semantic Web - Mark-Up - Artists' Books Online

Semantic Web - Mark-Up - Artists' Books Online | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The homepage displays the highest category in this framework, the ‘work’, which can be browsed beneath the headings ‘title’ ‘artist’ ‘publication date’ and ‘collection’. Clicking on any of the links takes you to the content of each work, displayed beneath the categories ‘work’, ‘editions’, ‘objects’ and also ‘images’. The text within the site is marked-up in XML and is defined by a DTD (Document Type Definition). One of the good things about Artists’ Books Online’s conceptual framework is that it seeks to explain the hierarchical nature of how this information is organised, including technical information. You can view the DTD and also a sample mark-up, an XML file that conforms to the DTD. An excerpt from the DTD is pictured below.
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Lucia Vilar's curator insight, December 10, 5:20 AM

"Artists’ Books Online (ABO) is “an online repository of facsimiles, metadata and criticism”. A collection of digitised online books curated under the direction of Johnanna Drucker, it operates beneath a conceptual framework with a defined hierarchy, an explanation of which can be found within the Site Mission page of the website. The homepage displays the highest category in this framework, the ‘work’, which can be browsed beneath the headings ‘title’ ‘artist’ ‘publication date’ and ‘collection’"

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Embrace the luxurious slow life with Japan's answer to the Orient Express

Embrace the luxurious slow life with Japan's answer to the Orient Express | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
In Japan's super-speed train culture, Seven Stars is slowing down for you to enjoy volcanoes, onsen and shorelines around Kyushu island.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

But this is no ordinary train: the back end of the carriage is a giant floor-to-ceiling window, like a flickering movie screen on which the passing landscapes are acting out their various parts.

There are volcanoes being majestic, and hills cloaked in forests of cypress trees and bamboo. There are rice fields shimmering with green and a shoreline of bays filled with boats and seaweed farms, which unravels as the train goes past.

Moreover, every landscape has at least a couple of people in it, waving. At me.

I wave back -- when I remember -- but I'm a bit busy. My wine glass is being refilled.

Behind me, by the bar, a gifted violin-and-piano duo is tackling everything from Mozart to Guns 'n' Roses, and they're asking for requests.

And on the table in front of me is a selection of amuse-bouches either wrapped in leaves, or served on delicate porcelain or in bamboo boxes; mouthfuls of locally-sourced beef, wood-smoked fish, pungent sea urchin, plus of course fugu -- the fish that needs to be cooked by a highly trained and licensed chef, or you're dead.

Exclusive and luxurious

I'm in Japan, a country famous for its trains, but generally not the sort that allow their passengers to savor their surroundings like this one does.

Shinkansen, the country's bullet trains, for example, have a fuselage-like interior which pays little heed to anything in its haste to get from one end of country to the other.

But now Japan Rail Kyushu have invested big money -- over $34 million -- into a special train with the deliberate aim of going slow.

This chocolate liveried locomotive chugs along the branch lines, truffling out local delicacies and hot springs, and giving locals cause to stop their planting and harvesting in order to stare and wave.

The "Seven Stars in Kyushu" is Japan's answer to the Orient Express, with its seven carriages having space for just 30 people in 14 suites; and it is very exclusive, with some 21 applications for every berth.

MORE: Whodunit on wheels: Riding London's murder mystery express

Seven Stars is Japan's version of the Orient Express,without the Agatha Christie murder mystery.

The interiors around me are examples of the best in Japanese craftsmanship: walls are of rosewood and maple, floors are made from walnut, window coverings are shoji paper screens, sliding glass doors are etched with flowers and birds.

Volcanoes and hot springs

Part of the train's purpose is to "introduce Kyushu to the world," according to the Seven Stars company, because Japan's third largest island is not a first-timer's destination.

Kyushu is the most southwesterly main island in the chain, which means it is the warmest and most tropically lush, with more than its fair share of volcanoes and spas.

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CurrentC

CurrentC | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
SECURITY AT EVERY LEVELPasscode Protected

A personal 4-digit code ensures only you can access your account.

Paycode Protected

Every transaction is guarded by a secure Paycode that's unique to every purchase.

Cloud Protected

Your information lives on our highly encrypted cloud – so it's never shared or stored on your phone.

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Semantic pulls Web development up by its Bootstraps - InfoWorld

Semantic pulls Web development up by its Bootstraps - InfoWorld | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The 1.0 version of the Web UI framework eases development, but Bootstrap's next version may give it competition
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Developers often complain that in Web UI frameworks, the labeling used for elements and styling are both hard to parse and hard to work with. Semantic, a new Web framework now in its 1.0 incarnation, is attempting to change that, provided the next generation of Bootstrap itself doesn't get there first.

Featured ResourcePresented by Scribe Software10 Best Practices for Integrating Data

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Semantic follows in roughly the same tradition as Bootstrap, but with a philosophy meant to make the framework more immediately useful to design-oriented developers. "Writing front-end code shouldn't require learning the naming or programming conventions of a particular developer," state its creators.

To that end, Semantic employs what is described as "simple, common language for parts of interface elements, and familiar patterns found in natural languages for describing elements." For example, there's the class syntax used to describe one of the elements on Semantic-ui.com's home page: "ui stackable center aligned very relaxed page grid."

All the components in the framework, according to the guide at LearnSematic.com, use the em and rem measurements for their sizes, so the element sizes are multiples of the metrics for the base font used on a given page. This makes it easier to resize elements for mobile use. Common Interface definitions, like "article" or "section" don't affect the way elements render for display.

The CSS used for the framework is variable-controlled via LESS, and a UI API allows for the management of element state, among other controls. Also included is a way to have the URLs for submissions defined using variables and substituted automatically, so those URLs and their parameters don't have to be hand-coded. Angular, Meteor, and other JavaScript frameworks are also supported.

Semantic UI's approach to layout can be both more flexible and more verbose than Bootstrap's. For instance, according to the examples provided for each framework, a breadcrumb navigation element in Bootstrap is implemented using an unordered list or ul HTML tag. In Semantic, it's created with a div, with "section" and "divider" classes marking up the individual links in the breadcrumb list and the dividers between them. The plus side of Semantic's approach is that it allows for more detailed inline customizations, but Bootstrap needs far less boilerplate to accomplish the same goal.

Semantic may be at a 1.0 release, but the site that provides documentation and examples for the framework is still raw. Usage examples for the API aren't available yet, nor have the "themes" and "layouts" sections of the Semantic-ui.com been implemented. Bootstrap, by contrast, already has a full set of documentation and a slew of existing themes, for both its current 3.x and previous 2.0 incarnations.

Plus, some of the innovations touted in Semantic are already being rolled into the next generation of Bootstrap. Bootstrap's 3.x incarnation doesn't use em measurements, for instance, but the next version promises to be em-centric, to feature "a new approach to configuring global theming options," a unified replacement for several existing display components such as panels and wells, and "hundreds more changes across the board." Many of those changes are still in flux, so an alpha release hasn't yet been offered, although it's being promised "in the coming months."

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Das Kapital: Schuldenaren van de wereld, verenigt u!

Das Kapital: Schuldenaren van de wereld, verenigt u! | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
'The Karl Marx MasterCard – When You’re Short of Kapital', 'The Marx Card – Because Credit is the Opiate of the Masses' en 'There are Some Things Money Can’t Buy. Especially If You Abolish All Private Property.' (onder meer via het befaamde - LOL - Maoist Rebel News) werden direct voorgesteld. Op twitter komt onder #marxcard een tweede golf van geestige slagzinnen naar buiten, waaronder 'Debtors of the world unite! You have nothing to lose but your credit rating!' Nog betere suggesties? Alle tegels gaarne in de comments, de winnaar wordt bepaald door het aantal plusjes.
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VINYL is BACK and you can thank Sonos for that

VINYL is BACK and you can thank Sonos for that | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The format that wouldn’t die is officially in remission
Jan Bergmans's insight:

With renewed interest in pure stereo, stoked ironically by hi-res audio file formats, sales are soaring and manufacturers have been quick to capitalise with a new generation of digital friendly 12-inch disc spinners, aimed at the green fields between audiophile and nostalgia buff.

The latest vinyl sales figures, released by the British Phonographic Industry, make for fascinating reading. This year, UK album sales are on course to top the million mark for the first time since the heyday of Oasis and Blur.

By September, 780,674 platters had already been purchased by new age vinyl junkies. Compare that to a format low in 2007, when annual UK disc sales sunk to 205,292 units.

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Orlando Figes [Home]

Orlando Figes [Home] | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Just Send Me Word is a true love story based on 1,246 letters smuggled in and out of the Pechora labour camp between 1946 and 1955. The letters were exchanged between Lev Mishchenko, a prisoner in Pechora, and Svetlana Ivanova, his girlfriend in Moscow.

To buy Just Send Me Word click here.

Praise for Just Send Me Word:

"This powerful narrative by a distinguished historian will take its place not just in history but in literature" (Robert Massie)

"A poignant record illuminating the experiences of the millions who suffered untold miseries in Stalin's grinding system of repression - and throughout the history of Russia as a whole. But, more than anything, this is a book about love ... as fascinating and inspiring as it is heartbreaking; a unique contribution to Gulag scholarship as well as a study of the universal power of love, as relevant now as it was then. It is impossible to read without shedding tears" (Simon Sebag Montefiore, Financial Times)

"Electrifying, passionate, devoted, despairing, exhilarating ... a tale of hope, resilience, grit and love" (The Times)

"Remarkable ... moving... possesses extraordinary value ... a notable contribution to Gulag literature" (Max Hastings, Sunday Times)

"Immensely touching ... [a] heartening gem of a book" (Anna Reid Literary Review)
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Home

Home | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

QVI BV makes it possible, with the help of it’s “intelligent software”, and in a fully automated way, to observe, recognise and make a judgement on the behaviour and intentions of people who appear on camera images, from their actions.  Our system can also flawlessly automatically recognise complex human activities.

Through the behavioural scientists of the QVI  organisation, we have the knowledge to recognise abnormal behaviour. This, in combination with the high level knowledge of video analysis technology, makes our product unique. QVI BV is uniquely positioned to develop tailormade solutions that  accommodate client specific requirements.

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Blackphone: Privacy for Lazy People

Blackphone: Privacy for Lazy People | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Those who want easy smartphone privacy will need to be willing to slap down $629 for it, the price tag on the phone that’s expected to be released in April.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Abroad, Dutch telecommunications company KPN has already committed to buy 500,000 Blackphones to sell exclusively in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands, says Janke, generating a couple hundred million dollars in revenue for the new company.

“I’m glad they think they can make money selling privacy,” said ACLU technologist Chris Soghoian speaking at a security conference in San Francisco Thursday. “The proof is in the pudding. My biggest concern is ongoing updates for Android. The Blackphone may be secure today but it needs regular updates to make sure it stays secure.”

There’s also the possibility that someone using the phone would download malware or a malicious app from Google Play, though the phone will scan apps and let users decide how much information they want to share with each.

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Hour of Code Isn’t Just For Kids, It’s For You

Hour of Code Isn’t Just For Kids, It’s For You | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
If you think learning to code is just for kids, you're wrong. It's never too late to learn.

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., Amy Melendez
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This Little USB Necklace Hacks Your Computer In No Time Flat

This Little USB Necklace Hacks Your Computer In No Time Flat | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Quick! The bad guy/super villain has left the room! Plug in a mysterious device that'll hack up their computer while an on-screen progress bar ticks forward..
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Called USBdriveby, it’s a USB-powered microcontroller-on-a-chain, rigged to exploit the inherently awful security flaws lurking in your computer’s USB ports. In about 60 seconds, it can pull off a laundry list of nasty tricks:

 It starts by pretending to be a keyboard/mouse.If you have a network monitor app like Little Snitch running, it uses a series of keystrokes to tell LittleSnitch that everything is okay and to silence all warnings.It disables OS X’s built-in firewall.It pops into your DNS settings and tweaks them to something under the hacker’s control, allowing them to replace pretty much any website you try to visit with one of their own creation.It opens up a backdoor, then establishes an outbound connection to a remote server which can send remote commands. Since the connection is outbound, it eliminates the need to tinker with the user’s router port forwarding settings.It closes any windows and settings screens it opened up, sweeping up its footprints as it heads for the door.

So in 30-60 seconds, this device hijacks your machine, disables many layers of security, cleans up the mess it makes, and opens a connection for remote manipulation even after the device has been removed. That’s… kind of terrifying.

While the video above focuses on OS X, the methods tapped here aren’t exclusive to Apple’s platform. Kamkar says everything shown so far is “easily extendable to Windows or *nix.”

So what can you do to protect yourself from things like this? Not a whole lot, really — that’s why attacks like this and BadUSB are so freaky. A lot of these flaws are inherent to the way the USB protocol was designed and implemented across so many hundreds of millions of computers; short of filling your USB ports with cement or never, ever leaving your computer’s ports unattended while out and about, there’s no magic fix.

[via Hacker News]

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IBM Watson Analytics - Storyboard - United States

IBM Watson Analytics - Storyboard - United States | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Once upon a time, professionals had to use complex analytics software or get help from someone else when they needed answers to their business questions.

 

Now, with the Watson Analytics beta open for business, the story has a happy ending.

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Germany Examines Ban on Employees Checking Work Emails at Home

Germany Examines Ban on Employees Checking Work Emails at Home | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Germany Examines Ban on Employees Checking Work Emails at Home
By Andy Eckardt

MAINZ, Germany - Imagine life without the buzz of a smartphone signaling yet another business email after leaving the office.

German employees could soon have legal protection preventing them from dealing with work-related phone calls and email traffic after hours and on weekends.

Labor Minister Andrea Nahles is contemplating introducing "anti-stress" regulations in Europe's economic powerhouse.

She told the Rheinische Post newspaper that it is "indisputable that there is a connection between permanent availability and psychological diseases." Government officials are collecting data as part of a push to draft a proposal for lawmakers next year.

Some German companies have already taken voluntary measures.

Volkswagen has capped after-work email for some employees who have been issued company-owned smartphones. For workers under wage agreements, the company's email server is programmed to stop delivering messages between 6:15 p.m. and 7 a.m. the following morning. Weekends are also off-limits.

"Supervisors and employees regard the regulation as a signal to respect recreation times and to interrupt after-work hours only in emergencies," Volkswagen spokesman Markus Schlesag told NBC News.

German union officials say that the discussion about after-work emails illustrates a broader problem.

"We see a strong increase of time pressure, multi-tasking requirements and high performance standards," said Ingo Nuernberger of Germany's DGB confederation of unions. "And more and more people take work home."

A recent poll by Germany's Forsa institute — commissioned by health insurer DAK — found that 52 percent of those polled backed "anti-stress" laws. And seven-in-ten agreed that pressure from emails and calls outside work hours had increased significantly.

"Good and healthy work that can be maintained for a long time is a competitive advantage"
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Lost languages leave traces on the brain

Lost languages leave traces on the brain | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Babies' brains adjust to listening to a language, even if they never learn it.
Jan Bergmans's insight:
 Lost languages leave traces on the brainBabies' brains adjust to listening to a language, even if they never learn it.

by Cathleen O'Grady Nov 21 2014, 10:45pm CET

29Flickr user Prayitno

Our brains start soaking in details from the languages around us from the moment we can hear them. One of the first things infants learn of their native languages is the system of consonants and vowels, as well as other speech sound characteristics, like pitch. In the first year of life, a baby’s ear tunes in to the particular set of sounds being spoken in its environment, and the brain starts developing the ability to tell subtle differences among them—a foundation that will make a difference in meaning down the line, allowing the child to learn words and grammar.

But what happens if that child gets shifted into a different culture after laying the foundations of its first native language? Does it forget everything about that first language, or are there some remnants that remain buried in the brain?

According to a recent PNAS paper, the effects of very early language learning are permanently etched into the brain, even if input from that language stops and it’s replaced by another language. To identify this lasting influence, the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans on children who had been adopted to see what neural patterns could be identified years after adoption.

Because not all linguistic features have easily identifiable effects on the brain, the researchers decided to focus on lexical tone. This is a feature found in some languages that allows a single arrangement of consonants and vowels to have different meanings that are distinguished by a change in pitch. For example, in Mandarin Chinese, the word “ma” with a rising tone means “hemp”—the same syllable with a falling tone means “scold.”

People who speak tone languages have differences in brain activity in a certain region of the brain’s left hemisphere. This region activates in response to pitch differences that are used to convey a difference in linguistic meaning; non-linguistic pitch is processed in the right hemisphere. Tone information is learned very early in life: infants learning Chinese languages (including Mandarin and Cantonese) show signs of recognizing tonal contrasts as early as four months.

The researchers focused on 21 Chinese children who had been adopted early in life. The average age of the children at adoption was 12.8 months, which meant that they were likely to have learned to recognize tone before being adopted. Since adoption, the children had been exposed exclusively to French, had grown up as French monolingual speakers, and had no remaining conscious knowledge of Chinese.

As controls, the researchers used 11 children who spoke only French, as well as a third group of 12 children who spoke both Chinese and French. The children, all between 9 and 17 years old, completed a task involving tone discrimination while in the fMRI scanner. They heard pairs of phrases made up of nonsense words using Chinese speech sounds (like “brillig” or “strint” in English), or hummed phrases with nothing but tone information. Each pair of terms was either identical or had a difference in tone on the last syllable. The children were asked to press a button to show whether the final syllable was different or the same.

All of the children were able to answer with very high accuracy, and there were no differences between the groups on either accuracy or reaction times. However, their fMRI scans showed a difference in how they processed the information.

Chinese-French bilingual children used the specialized left-hemisphere brain region found in speakers of tone languages, while French monolingual speakers used only their right hemispheres, as they would for processing any complex sound. Adopted ex-Chinese speaking children showed the same pattern as the Chinese-speaking bilinguals—their brains showed activation in the specialized tone region in the left hemisphere.

There was also a stronger activation among children who had been older when they were adopted. The researchers suggest that this indicates that the representation of lexical tone in the brain gets strengthened with more exposure to it. However, the length of time since the children had been adopted made no difference to the amount of activation in the brain, possibly indicating that, once the representation of tone in the brain has been established, time doesn’t weaken or erase it.

What makes this study particularly useful, says Dr Cristina Dye, a researcher who studies childhood language acquisition, is that lexical tone is very well suited to probing this question. Previous studies tackling the same question used tasks that required more complex linguistic knowledge, which children are less likely to have learned at a very young age. Lexical tone also has the benefit of being very difficult for adults to learn, meaning that traces of it are most likely from early childhood.

As with many fMRI studies, the sample sizes are small. This is due to the expense of the technology, as well as the stringent criteria for participants. Nevertheless, the results corroborate behavioral studies that have shown similar traces of lost languages, says Dye.

The next thing to determine, write the researchers, is whether the neural traces of the first forgotten language can affect how subsequent languages are learned or processed by the brain. There may also be implications for learning the lost languages: people with forgotten exposure to languages may be able to learn that language faster, or more completely, than people with no exposure at all.

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Search | LACMA Collections

Search | LACMA Collections | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
ArtistUnknown (88) Apply Unknown filter Felice Beato (attributed to) (30) Apply Felice Beato (attributed to) filter Samuel Bourne (27) Apply Samuel Bourne filter Eugène Atget (3) Apply Eugène Atget filter Samuel Bourne (possibly) (2) Apply Samuel Bourne (possibly) filter William Henry Fox Talbot (1) Apply William Henry Fox Talbot filter ClassificationPhotographs (144) Apply Photographs filter Sculpture (6) Apply Sculpture filter Tools and Equipment (1) Apply Tools and Equipment filter Curatorial AreaPhotography (144) Apply Photography filter Chinese Art (6) Apply Chinese Art filter South and Southeast Asian Art (1) Apply South and Southeast Asian Art filter Chronology10,000-500 BC (1) Apply 10,000-500 BC filter 1st - 9th centuries (4) Apply 1st - 9th centuries filter 10th-12th centuries (1) Apply 10th-12th centuries filter 13th - 15th centuries (1) Apply 13th - 15th centuries filter 16th century (2) Apply 16th century filter 17th century (1) Apply 17th century filter 1801-1850 (1) Apply 1801-1850 filter 1851-1900 (140) Apply 1851-1900 filter LocationAhmanson Building, floor 4 (1) Apply Ahmanson Building, floor 4 filter
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StartMail - Home

StartMail - Home | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
StartMail Lets You Take Back Your Right to Communicate Privately

We believe privacy is a fundamental human right.
No one should read your email without your permission.

Easy to use, one-click PGP encryptionWe never read your email (unlike those other guys)Based outside of US jurisdictionBuilt by a company you can trust
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What if we ended the War on Drugs?

What if we ended the War on Drugs? | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Is the War on Drugs doing more harm than good? In a bold talk, drug policy reformist Ethan Nadelmann makes an impassioned plea to end the "backward, heartless, disastrous" movement to stamp out the drug trade. He gives two big reasons we should focus on intelligent regulation instead.
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ac-dijon.fr

ac-dijon.fr | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Présentation de l'institution et de ses services (rectorat, dsden), l'orientation, les examens et concours, la formation, l'ouverture sur le monde. Côte-d'Or (21).
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Les inscriptions aux concours statutaires et recrutements réservés de personnels enseignants des premier et second degrés, de conseillers principaux d'éducation et de conseillers d'orientation-psychologues de la session 2015 débuteront le 11 septembre 2014. Les inscriptions aux concours de la session 2015 auront lieu par internet du jeudi 11 septembre 2014, à partir de 12h00, au mardi 21 octobre 2014, 17 heures, heure de Paris.

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Library of Alexandria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Library of Alexandria

This article is about the Ptolemaic library of the Ptolemy dynasty and Roman Egypt. For the modern library, see Bibliotheca Alexandrina. The Royal Library of Alexandria, or Ancient Library of Alexandria, in Alexandria, Egypt, was one of the largest and most significant libraries of the ancient world.

Jan Bergmans's insight:

The Royal Library of Alexandria, or Ancient Library of Alexandria, in Alexandria, Egypt, was one of the largest and most significant libraries of the ancient world. It was dedicated to the Muses, the nine goddesses of the arts.[

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Waarom meisjes dommer zijn dan jongens

Waarom meisjes dommer zijn dan jongens | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
De opmerkelijkste krant van Nederland - Waarom meisjes dommer zijn dan jongens8
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Waarom meisjes dommer zijn dan jongensJonge mannen behoren slim, sterk, groot en grappig te zijn. Tenminste, dat willen de clichés, die gretig bevestigd worden in reclames en Hollywoodfilms. Dat beeld heeft nefaste gevolgen voor jongeren, meent Maria do Mar Pereira (University of Warwick, VK). De sociologe ‘infiltreerde’ drie maanden in een klas in een Portugese middelbare school. Ze woonde niet alleen alle lessen bij, maar nam ook deel aan de examens, ze at met de veertienjarige scholieren in de kantine, vervoegde hen tijdens de pauzes en hing zelfs na school met hen rond in het shopppingcenter. Daardoor kon ze naar eigen zeggen gedrag observeren dat ouders of leerkrachten niet te zien krijgen. In het boek dat Pereira schreef over haar onderzoeksproject (Doing Gender in the Playground: The Negotiation of Gender and Sexuality in School) concludeert ze dat de jongens het gevoel hebben constant onder druk te staan om hun dominantie en kracht te bewijzen. Dat doen ze bijvoorbeeld door te vechten en te drinken, meisjes seksueel te intimideren, hun gevoelens te onderdrukken en nooit om hulp te vragen. De meisjes proberen daarentegen hun capaciteiten niet te veel te laten zien. Ze doen zich minder intelligent voor dan ze eigenlijk zijn, ze durven niets te ondernemen tegen intimidaties en ze stoppen met hobby’s die als ‘onvrouwelijk’ te boek zouden kunnen staan. Volgens Pereira gelden haar observaties niet alleen voor Portugal, maar voor jongeren in de hele westerse wereld, die gedomineerd wordt door de Angelsaksische media en populaire cultuur. ‘Deze onrealistische ideeën van mannelijkheid en vrouwelijkheid nastreven leidt tot problemen’, zegt Pereira, ‘zoals een laag zelfbeeld, pestgedrag, fysiek en verbaal geweld, gezondheidsproblemen en een verlies van potentieel jong talent.’
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