Semantic Gnosis Web
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Semantic Gnosis Web
Ariadne's invisible wire in the web maze
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Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center

Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.
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How to Tell a Compelling Story with Data - 6 Rules & 6 Tools

How to Tell a Compelling Story with Data - 6 Rules & 6 Tools | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The way a message is communicated is almost as important as the message itself. Our world is moving towards a more data-oriented approach to decision making i…
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British spies have been hacking themselves and their own families so they can send birthday cards

British spies have been hacking themselves and their own families so they can send birthday cards | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
23 show all

The files show the huge amount of information that is being gathered by British spying groups. Ministers have previously argued that only people who are suspected of criminal or terrorist behaviour will be tracked – but they show that spies have been collecting bulk personal datasets on a range of innocent people for years, and arguing that they are used to find legitimate suspects.

The papers show how that same information has been used by spies to find out personal information, like looking up people’s addresses to send birthday cards.

“We’ve seen a few instances recently of individual users crossing the line with their database use, looking up addresses in order to send birthday cards, checking passport details to organise personal travel, checking details of family members for personal reasons. Another area of concern is the use of the database as a ‘convenient’ way to check the personal details of colleagues when filling out service forms on their behalf.
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Britain’s spy agency GCHQ worked to expose Harry Potter leaks

The papers also show how the organisation had to explicitly tell spies not to search for themselves within the database – a practice that can often lead to accidental intrusion into other people’s lives.
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How Technology Helps Creditors Control Debtors

How Technology Helps Creditors Control Debtors | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
From software that records your every keystroke, to GPS tracking, to ignition kill switches—lenders have more power over their customers than ever.
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Detective Mode was an extreme invasion of privacy, a mustache-twirling moment of villainy in the history of commercial surveillance. But the excesses of Detective Mode are just particularly unsavory examples of an increasingly prevalent trend in credit transactions—remote control of devices by lenders, that infringes on the privacy and security of the debtors. While few lenders will go as far as to take naked pictures of their debtors, wherever there is an expensive device that can be easily absconded with, it makes sense for lenders to add both a kill switch and GPS. A New York Times story in 2014 looked at the increasing prevalence of starter interrupt devices—kill switches—in cars financed by subprime loans, reporting that the mechanisms had “reduced late payments to roughly 7 percent from nearly 29 percent.” Lenders aren’t installing these devices because they’re interested in tracking their debtors’ every move; starter interrupt mechanisms are just an economical way to protect their investments. But even when lenders aren’t stooping to the kinds of skin-crawling extremes that warrant a FTC lawsuit, there’s something about these controls that feels dangerous and invasive. In the same 2014 report, the Times described how a woman in Austin, Texas, had fled her abusive husband, only to be tracked down by the subprime lender that had financed her car. By driving to the shelter, she had violated the loan agreement, which restricted her from driving outside of a four county radius. She was tracked down via GPS and her car was repossessed. A rootkit is malicious software that enables unauthorized access to a computer, while masking its own existence from the authorized user. We owe this proliferation of lender kill switches to the convergence of two trends. One is the uptick in subprime lending, a phenomenon that received a great deal of attention during the 2008 home mortgage crisis, but less so when it came to movable property like cars and computers. And while subprime lending in the housing market has fallen off since the 2008 crisis, it has rebounded in other types of loans—auto loans, credit cards, personal loans. Alongside this rise in subprime consumer lending, there has been a steady increase in the use of access controls in devices. What began with digital rights management for intellectual property has expanded into ever-stranger forms, like access controls for Keurig pods and self-cleaning cat litterboxes. Mechanisms that prevent Keurig machines from using off-label coffee pods are annoying but relatively harmless. But the history of digital rights management (DRM) has always had a dark side. In 2005, security researchers found that the DRM protection on Sony BMG music CDs would install a rootkit if the CD were inserted into a user’s computer. A rootkit is malicious software that enables unauthorized access to a computer, while masking its own existence from the authorized user. It’s a tool for hackers, thieves, and nation-state adversaries. In the quest for perfect protection of Sony’s intellectual property, the company threw the privacy and security of their customers under the bus. The Sony BMG rootkit incident was the first scandal of its kind, but it wouldn’t be the last. In 2014, several outlets reported that Adobe’s ebook reader was tracking readers’ habits and transmitting back unencrypted logs of those activities. It seemed as though wherever DRM went, privacy invasion followed. The average user owns very little of the digital world they inhabit. DRM is intended to protect revenues from copyright infringement. But it doesn’t do just that, it transforms the relationship between consumers and software developers. Ebooks, video games, software, and other digital goods are increasingly distributed under licenses, rather than sold as outright property. (And although some files, like music, aren’t sold as licenses, they can’t be resold on a secondary market like regular property either.) The law, working in tandem with DRM, shrank the very concept of ownership, allowing companies to force end-users into renter relationships. The average user owns very little of the digital world they inhabit. Today, companies like
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Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!

VoCore: Mini Linux Computer, Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!
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DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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Jan Bergmans's curator insight, April 18, 5:33 AM
DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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GAGGED: Brussels tells Dutch MPs they CAN'T debate referendum result as it may fuel Brexit

GAGGED: Brussels tells Dutch MPs they CAN'T debate referendum result as it may fuel Brexit | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The European elite have gagged elected politicians in the Netherlands, ordering them to suppress the Dutch people's democratic voice until after our own referendum is done and dusted on June 23.

In an astonishing statement delivered to the Dutch parliament this week Prime Minister Mark Rutte admitted he had been ordered by other EU leaders not to mention the referendum for the next two months.
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LSD's impact on the brain revealed in groundbreaking images

LSD's impact on the brain revealed in groundbreaking images | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
First modern scans of people high on psychedelic drug has given researchers unprecedented insight into neural basis for its effects
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Interpreting, enforcing and changing the GNU GPL, as applied to combining Linux and ZFS — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software

The FSF is a charity with a worldwide mission to advance software freedom.
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Variety, Not Volume, Is Driving Big Data Initiatives

Variety, Not Volume, Is Driving Big Data Initiatives | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
When many executives think of Big Data, they think of large volumes of data. A common notion is that bigger is often better when it comes to data and analytics, but this is not always the case. In their 2012 article, Big Data: The Management Revolution, MIT Professor Erik Brynjolfsson and principal research scientist Andrew McAfee spoke of the “three V’s” of Big Data — volume, velocity, and variety — noting that “2.5 exabytes of data are created every day, and that number is doubling every 40 months or so. A petabyte is one quadrillion bytes, or the equivalent of about 20 million filing cabinets’ worth of text. An exabyte is 1,000 times that amount, or 1 billion gigabytes.” This focus on the rate of data proliferation has sometimes obscured an appreciation of data and analytics value. The result is a myth about Big Data — that Big Data is synonymous with large volumes of data.

In 2012, when Brynjolfsson and McAfee published their article, Big Data was a new phenomenon. While a handful of Silicon Valley innovators like Google, Facebook, and Amazon were employing Big Data with success, Big Data was largely uncharted territory for mainstream Fortune 1,000 firms. The past several years have been period of exploration, experimentation, and trial and error in Big Data among Fortune 1,000 companies, and the result has been a different story. For these firms, it is not the ability to process and manage large data volumes that is driving successful Big Data outcomes. Rather, it is the ability to integrate more sources of data than ever before — new data, old data, big data, small data, structured data, unstructured data, social media data, behavioral data, and legacy data.

This is known as the “variety challenge,” and has emerged as the top data priority for mainstream companies, according to the fourth annual Big Data Executive Survey, conducted by NewVantage Partners and released last month. In the world of the Fortune 1,000, we are seeing that variety trumps volume and velocity when it comes to Big Data success.
Tapping Into the “Long Tail” of Big Data

When asked about drivers of Big Data success, 69% of corporate executives named greater data variety as the most important factor, followed by volume (25%), with velocity (6%) trailing. In the corporate world, the big opportunity is to be found in integrating more sources of data, not bigger amounts. Variety, not volume, is king. MIT professor and 2015 Turing Award recipient Michael Stonebraker calls this the “long tail” of Big Data, as companies focus on integrating sources of data that have traditionally been ignored, as well as identifying new data sources. Stonebraker cites the example of life sciences firms with thousands of research scientists, each with their own research databases that have not been tied together for analysis in the past. Tapping into more data sources has emerged as the new data frontier within the corporate world.

How are corporations focusing their data management efforts to develop more robust data and analytics? There are 3 primary paths that firms are taking:


Capture Legacy Data Sources

It may come as a surprise, but many firms see the big opportunity in Big Data resulting from the capture of traditional legacy data sources that have gone untapped in the past. These are data sets that have typically sat outside the purview of traditional data marts or warehouses — the “long tail” data. A significant majority (57%) of firms identified this as their top data priority. One of the beauties of Big Data is that organizations can now go deeper into their own data before they turn to new sources.
Integrate Unstructured Data

Businesses have been inhibited in their ability to mine and analyze the vast amounts of information residing in text and documents. Traditional data environments were designed to maintain and process structured data — numbers and variables — not words and pictures. A growing percentage of firms (29%) are now focusing on integrating this unstructured data, for purposes ranging from customer sentiment analysis to analysis of regulatory documents to insurance claim adjudication. The ability to integrate unstructured data is broadening traditional analytics to combine quantitative metrics with qualitative content.
Add Social Media and Behavioral Data Sources

While much of the early excitement around Big Data resulted from the capture of social media and behavioral activities by firms like eBay and Facebook, these applications have been relatively nascent among the Fortune 1,000, with just 14% citing this as a priority. As firms progress with their Big Data efforts, it is likely that they will turn attention to untapped opportunities presented by social data in areas such as patient adherence and mobile device recommendations based on consumer purchasing behavior and preferences. Timely recommendations can yield immediate results.

As mainstream companies progress on their Big Data journey, we should expect that expanding the variety of data sources for analysis will continue to dominate their interests.
About the Author

Randy Bean is CEO and managing partner of consultancy NewVantage Partners. You can follow him at @RandyBeanNVP.
Tags: Analytics Strategy, Big Data, Data Management
Reprint #: W41601
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Alexa, Cortana, and Siri Aren’t Novelties Anymore. They’re Our Terrifyingly Convenient Future.

Alexa, Cortana, and Siri Aren’t Novelties Anymore. They’re Our Terrifyingly Convenient Future. | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Cover Story
Read this first.
April 3 2016 8:04 PM
Terrifyingly Convenient
1.1k
699
126
A.I. assistants can give you the news, order you a pizza, and tell you a joke. All you have to do is trust them—completely.
By Will Oremus
160330_CS_alexaLurkingSofa

Photo by iStock. Photo illustration by Holly Allen.

It was a weeknight, after dinner, and the baby was in bed. My wife and I were alone—we thought—discussing the sorts of things you might discuss with your spouse and no one else. (Specifically, we were critiquing a friend’s taste in romantic partners.) I was midsentence when, without warning, another woman’s voice piped in from the next room. We froze.
Will Oremus Will Oremus

Will Oremus is Slate's senior technology writer. Email him at will.oremus@slate.com or follow him on Twitter.

“I HELD THE DOOR OPEN FOR A CLOWN THE OTHER DAY,” the woman said in a loud, slow monotone. It took us a moment to realize that her voice was emanating from the black speaker on the kitchen table. We stared slack-jawed as she—it—continued: “I THOUGHT IT WAS A NICE JESTER.”

“What. The hell. Was that,” I said after a moment of stunned silence. Alexa, the voice assistant whose digital spirit animates the Amazon Echo, did not reply. She—it—responds only when called by name. Or so we had believed.

We pieced together what must have transpired. Somehow, Alexa’s speech recognition software had mistakenly picked the word Alexa out of something we said, then chosen a phrase like “tell me a joke” as its best approximation of whatever words immediately followed. Through some confluence of human programming and algorithmic randomization, it chose a lame jester/gesture pun as its response.

In retrospect, the disruption was more humorous than sinister. But it was also a slightly unsettling reminder that Amazon’s hit device works by listening to everything you say, all the time. And that, for all Alexa’s human trappings—the name, the voice, the conversational interface—it’s no more sentient than any other app or website. It’s just code, built by some software engineers in Seattle with a cheesy sense of humor.

But the Echo’s inadvertent intrusion into an intimate conversation is also a harbinger of a more fundamental shift in the relationship between human and machine. Alexa—and Siri and Cortana and all of the other virtual assistants that now populate our computers, phones, and living rooms—are just beginning to insinuate themselves, sometimes stealthily, sometimes overtly, and sometimes a tad creepily, into the rhythms of our daily lives. As they grow smarter and more capable, they will routinely surprise us by making our lives easier, and we’ll steadily become more reliant on them. Even as many of us continue to treat these bots as toys and novelties, they are on their way to becoming our primary gateways to all sorts of goods, services, and information, both public and personal. When that happens, the Echo won’t just be a cylinder in your kitchen that sometimes tells bad jokes. Alexa and virtual agents like it will be the prisms through which we interact with the online world. It’s a job to which they will necessarily bring a set of biases and priorities, some subtler than others. Some of those biases and priorities will reflect our own. Others, almost certainly, will not. Those vested interests might help to explain why they seem so eager to become our friends.
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Cover Story Read this first. April 3 2016 8:04 PM Terrifyingly Convenient 1.1k 699 126 A.I. assistants can give you the news, order you a pizza, and tell you a joke. All you have to do is trust them—completely. By Will Oremus 160330_CS_alexaLurkingSofa Photo by iStock. Photo illustration by Holly Allen. It was a weeknight, after dinner, and the baby was in bed. My wife and I were alone—we thought—discussing the sorts of things you might discuss with your spouse and no one else. (Specifically, we were critiquing a friend’s taste in romantic partners.) I was midsentence when, without warning, another woman’s voice piped in from the next room. We froze. Will Oremus Will Oremus Will Oremus is Slate's senior technology writer. Email him at will.oremus@slate.com or follow him on Twitter. “I HELD THE DOOR OPEN FOR A CLOWN THE OTHER DAY,” the woman said in a loud, slow monotone. It took us a moment to realize that her voice was emanating from the black speaker on the kitchen table. We stared slack-jawed as she—it—continued: “I THOUGHT IT WAS A NICE JESTER.” “What. The hell. Was that,” I said after a moment of stunned silence. Alexa, the voice assistant whose digital spirit animates the Amazon Echo, did not reply. She—it—responds only when called by name. Or so we had believed. We pieced together what must have transpired. Somehow, Alexa’s speech recognition software had mistakenly picked the word Alexa out of something we said, then chosen a phrase like “tell me a joke” as its best approximation of whatever words immediately followed. Through some confluence of human programming and algorithmic randomization, it chose a lame jester/gesture pun as its response. In retrospect, the disruption was more humorous than sinister. But it was also a slightly unsettling reminder that Amazon’s hit device works by listening to everything you say, all the time. And that, for all Alexa’s human trappings—the name, the voice, the conversational interface—it’s no more sentient than any other app or website. It’s just code, built by some software engineers in Seattle with a cheesy sense of humor. But the Echo’s inadvertent intrusion into an intimate conversation is also a harbinger of a more fundamental shift in the relationship between human and machine. Alexa—and Siri and Cortana and all of the other virtual assistants that now populate our computers, phones, and living rooms—are just beginning to insinuate themselves, sometimes stealthily, sometimes overtly, and sometimes a tad creepily, into the rhythms of our daily lives. As they grow smarter and more capable, they will routinely surprise us by making our lives easier, and we’ll steadily become more reliant on them. Even as many of us continue to treat these bots as toys and novelties, they are on their way to becoming our primary gateways to all sorts of goods, services, and information, both public and personal. When that happens, the Echo won’t just be a cylinder in your kitchen that sometimes tells bad jokes. Alexa and virtual agents like it will be the prisms through which we interact with the online world. It’s a job to which they will necessarily bring a set of biases and priorities, some subtler than others. Some of those biases and priorities will reflect our own. Others, almost certainly, will not. Those vested interests might help to explain why they seem so eager to become our friends.
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This Is Why You Prefer To Be Single Now

This Is Why You Prefer To Be Single Now | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Read our best tips on single life, and how to appreciate a positive relationship with your self
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Jan Bergmans's curator insight, April 7, 9:26 AM
Our possibilities are limitless, and the more time we spend with ourselves, the more we begin to see just how large we can actually dream. In the words of Bob Dylan: “When you ain’t got nothing you got nothin’ to lose.” Which is true, in terms of responsibility. Except you don’t have nothing. You have everything, right at your fingertips. The greatest joys I have ever known within a relationship are when you can share the joys of your own life, of the things you love and strive for – the things that make you who you are. When you know those things and live them, they are only then exacerbated by the people who come into your life and love them too. And vice versa. We can be proud and excited and strong for our loved ones when we are strong in ourselves. We can also exist entirely in the moment, without thinking about the future. Being single means a lot of traveling, sleeping over the whole bed, flirting, and wreckless fun. It’s about enjoying our own achievements, answering to no one, going where the wind takes you. It is a time we can fully commit to our education, our careers and hobbies. We spend so much of our lives either in love or thinking about being in love. So we must cherish those precious moments in between, the moments where we don’t have someone else to think about, the moments where we understand the true value of selfishness, and its place in the balance of all things. Because if you don’t know these things about yourself, you cannot truly understand your needs in compliance with somebody else’s – the bright somebody of your future. The somebody who will someday run alongside you, as your best and most wonderful single self. “My alone feels so good, I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude.” – Warsan Shire
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Fintech Firms Are Taking On the Big Banks, but Can They Win?

Fintech Firms Are Taking On the Big Banks, but Can They Win? | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
“Fintech,” of course, is short for financial technology, a catchall for a near-revolution of new technologies aimed at upending parts of the financial world, including payments, wealth management, lending, insurance and currency.

The fintech phrase itself is actually not new — it dates to the late 1980s and early 1990s — though it has taken on a heightened sense of importance and urgency now that it has been embraced by Silicon Valley as the new new thing. An estimated $19 billion of investment poured into the fintech bucket last year, according to Citigroup, up from just $1.8 billion five years earlier.

“The real threat to banks is not from Washington or Brussels but from start-ups all over the country creating interesting fintech start-ups that are chipping away at key parts of their franchise,” said Steve Case, a founder of AOL and an entrepreneur with investments in several fintech businesses, who just wrote a book about the future, “The Third Wave.”

The promise of all these new technologies is to fundamentally disrupt the biggest players in finance. Companies like Stripe, a payments company, hope to become replacements for PayPal and others. Lending Club wants to make getting a loan cheaper and easier. Wealthfront wants to advise you and manage your money from your phone. And, of course, Bitcoin and its many derivatives wants to be the new gold, or better yet, digital cash.

If they succeed, Wall Street as we know it may become an outpost of Palo Alto. According to a Citigroup report last week, fintech may be on the cusp of an “Uber moment,” as Antony Jenkins, the former chief executive of Barclays, predicted last year. Some 800,000 people will have lost their jobs at financial services companies to some of the newly dreamed up software in a decade, the report said. “Roughly 60 to 70 percent of retail banking employees are doing manual-processing-driven jobs,” the report explained. “If all the current manual processing can be replaced by automation, these jobs can disappear or evolve.”

The ripple effects are enormous: Consider not just the employees but the impact on commercial real estate, for example, if banks shut their coveted branches on the corners in major cities.

Others are less convinced. Wall Street denizens like the banking investor J. Christopher Flowers have declared that the fintech frenzy is simply that: hype that defies common sense and will leave a trail of failed companies in its wake.
Jan Bergmans's insight:
“Fintech,” of course, is short for financial technology, a catchall for a near-revolution of new technologies aimed at upending parts of the financial world, including payments, wealth management, lending, insurance and currency. The fintech phrase itself is actually not new — it dates to the late 1980s and early 1990s — though it has taken on a heightened sense of importance and urgency now that it has been embraced by Silicon Valley as the new new thing. An estimated $19 billion of investment poured into the fintech bucket last year, according to Citigroup, up from just $1.8 billion five years earlier. “The real threat to banks is not from Washington or Brussels but from start-ups all over the country creating interesting fintech start-ups that are chipping away at key parts of their franchise,” said Steve Case, a founder of AOL and an entrepreneur with investments in several fintech businesses, who just wrote a book about the future, “The Third Wave.” The promise of all these new technologies is to fundamentally disrupt the biggest players in finance. Companies like Stripe, a payments company, hope to become replacements for PayPal and others. Lending Club wants to make getting a loan cheaper and easier. Wealthfront wants to advise you and manage your money from your phone. And, of course, Bitcoin and its many derivatives wants to be the new gold, or better yet, digital cash. If they succeed, Wall Street as we know it may become an outpost of Palo Alto. According to a Citigroup report last week, fintech may be on the cusp of an “Uber moment,” as Antony Jenkins, the former chief executive of Barclays, predicted last year. Some 800,000 people will have lost their jobs at financial services companies to some of the newly dreamed up software in a decade, the report said. “Roughly 60 to 70 percent of retail banking employees are doing manual-processing-driven jobs,” the report explained. “If all the current manual processing can be replaced by automation, these jobs can disappear or evolve.” The ripple effects are enormous: Consider not just the employees but the impact on commercial real estate, for example, if banks shut their coveted branches on the corners in major cities. Others are less convinced. Wall Street denizens like the banking investor J. Christopher Flowers have declared that the fintech frenzy is simply that: hype that defies common sense and will leave a trail of failed companies in its wake.
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Alcoholisme bij vrouwen | gezondheid.be

Alcoholisme bij vrouwen | gezondheid.be | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Als men 20 jaren geleden over alcoholisme sprak, dan dacht men automatisch aan mannelijke drinkers. Ook in studie en onderzoek over alcoholisme bleef de vrouw afwezig of tenminste onzichtbaar en conclusies van wetenschappelijk onderzoek in verband met alcoholism
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Public consultation on the role of publishers in the copyright value chain and on the 'panorama exception' –

Public consultation on the role of publishers in the copyright value chain and on the 'panorama exception' – | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
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It isn't just the DMCA that is broken beyond repair: Copyright Office refuses FSF comments | Defective by Design

It isn't just the DMCA that is broken beyond repair: Copyright Office refuses FSF comments | Defective by Design | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
As we wrote back in February, submitting comments to the Copyright Office requires the use of proprietary JavaScript. No one should be required to use proprietary software simply to communicate with their government. But the Copyright Office would not offer any other means of submitting comments digitally. So we delivered the signed comment in person. But the Copyright Office has refused to accept the comment as delivered.

This is an unjust outcome for what we all hoped would be an opportunity to help the Copyright Office fix the broken anti-circumvention system. But while the Copyright Office refuses to listen, there are others who will. You've done so much already to help our voice be heard, can you help us finish the job? Here's what you can do to help:

If you microblog, please share the following message (or your own) with the hashtag #endDRM. We strongly suggest that if you use Twitter, you do it in a way that avoids using proprietary software:

The DMCA's anti-circumvention rules are broken beyond repair, the time to end Digital Restrictions Management is now. #endDRM https://u.fsf.org/1rq

Share this post with your friends and colleagues to help spread the word.
Support our fight to end DRM by making a donation

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HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent - Blog | add0n.com

HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent - Blog | add0n.com | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
HTML5 APIs Fingerprint Users - How to Prevent The word fingerprinting comes from the forensic analysis of a human hand. These fingerprints are considered markers of human identity as they’re not easy to alter and are durable over the lifetime of an individual. These characteristics make them suitable markers for human identity. In similar fashion, our computers and multimedia devices can be identified and tracked by websites we access on these devices.

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Hardly Anyone Trusts The Media Anymore — Medium

Hardly Anyone Trusts The Media Anymore — Medium | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Only 6 percent of people say they have a great deal of confidence in the press, about the same level of trust Americans have in Congress, according to a new survey released on Sunday.

The study mirrors past reports that found the public’s trust in mass media has reached historic lows, according to data gathered by the Media Insight Project, a partnership between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute. The report found faith in the press was just slightly higher than the 4 percent of people who said they trusted Congress.

Alongside the dire findings, the report found respondents valued accuracy above all else, with 85 percent of people saying it was extremely important to avoid errors in coverage. Timeliness and clarity followed closely, with 76 percent and 72 percent respectively saying those attributes were imperative among media sources.

“Over the last two decades, research shows the public has grown increasingly skeptical of the news industry,” the report reads. “The study reaffirms that consumers do value broad concepts of trust like fairness, balance, accuracy, and completeness. At least two-thirds of Americans cite each of these four general principles as very important to them.”

Ironically, despite news organizations’ ongoing battle to master social media platforms, that trust doesn’t extend to the likes of Facebook and Twitter. The report found just 12 percent of people trust media delivered via Mark Zuckerberg’s evolving juggernaut, even though 87 percent of people get news from Facebook.

LinkedIn, in fact, garnered the most faith over competitors like Instagram and Reddit, with 23 percent or people finding links from the site trustworthy.

The Associated Press notes the news media has been embattled by a series of high profile missteps, particularly Rolling Stone’s retracted report about a rape at a fraternity at the University of Virginia.

The media has also faced a barrage of criticism during the ongoing presidential campaign season, particularly from Republican leaders including Donald Trump and Ted Cruz. Trump has launched repeated attacks against Fox News’ Megyn Kelly (culminating in a reported “clearing of the air” last week), while Cruz has lambasted the press for being too hostile.

You can take a look at the full results here.
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Basisinkomen 2018- Een basisinkomen voor iedere volwassene. Teken de petitie.

Een basisinkomen voor iedere volwassene. Teken de petitie.
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Onderzoek naar LSD biedt mogelijkheid voor therapie

Onderzoek naar LSD biedt mogelijkheid voor therapie | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Britse onderzoekers hebben eindelijk onderzoek gedaan naar de effecten van LSD op de werking van de hersenen. Het onderzoek heef
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GVB gaat door met opslaan dna spugende reizigers - Security.NL

GVB gaat door met opslaan dna spugende reizigers - Security.NL | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Openbaarvervoerbedrijf GVB gaat door met de proef waarbij dna-materiaal van spugende reizigers wordt opgeslagen en indien onbekend 12 jaar in de dna-database van het Nederlands Forensisch Instituut (NFI) wordt bewaard. Van het project, dat vorig jaar oktober werd gestart, moet een afschrikwekkende werking afgaan, zodat het aantal spuugincidenten afneemt.

In het geval een GVB-medewerker is bespuugd zal een speciaal ov-zorgteam het speeksel veiligstellen. Dit gebeurt via een zogeheten spuugkit, die uit een wattenstaafje, plastic houder en handschoenen bestaat. Als de medewerker aangifte doet wordt het buisje met dna bijgevoegd. Een laboratorium zal vervolgens kijken of er dna uit het speeksel kan worden gehaald, waarna het NFI in de nationale dna-database naar een match zoekt.

Indien er een match is wordt de verdachte op het politiebureau uitgenodigd. De officier van justitie kan vervolgens besluiten om aan de hand van het dna-materiaal en eventuele camerabeelden tot vervolging over te gaan. Het bespugen van een persoon in een publieke taak kan met een gevangenisstraf van maximaal 3 maanden of een boete van 4.000 euro worden bestraft. Komt het dna niet in de NFI-database voor, dan wordt het voor een periode van 12 jaar opgeslagen.
Inzet

De spuugkit is de afgelopen zes maanden vijf keer ingezet. Vier keer is daarbij aangifte bij de politie gedaan en in één geval leidde dit tot een match met een dna-profiel uit de database van het NFI. Deze verdachte moet op 12 april voor de rechter verschijnen, zo meldt de Telegraaf. Omdat de omvang van de proef beperkt is heeft het GVB besloten die met drie maanden te verlengen.
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It's Time for World Leaders to Make Good on Our Promises

It's Time for World Leaders to Make Good on Our Promises | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Trust has also collapsed. Citizens are questioning the motivations and ability of leaders to make the right decisions. The amount of money in politics is leaving a sour taste in their mouths. While money is necessary to finance certain features of democracy, public policy can never be for sale. That was the message in our recent Financing Democracy report -- a remarkable piece with a focus on the funding of political parties and election campaigns and the risk of policy capture.

2016 must be the year of implementation. We need to make good on what we said we would do last year: chart a credible path and monitor our progress towards achieving the SDGs; deliver on our commitments to reducing emissions and transitioning towards lower carbon economies; close once and for all the international loopholes that wealthy individuals and powerful companies use to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. Now is the time for collective action -- for promoting stronger and more inclusive growth; for reducing inequality gaps; for integrating the refugees knocking on our doors; for giving hope to the next generation.
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Trust has also collapsed. Citizens are questioning the motivations and ability of leaders to make the right decisions. The amount of money in politics is leaving a sour taste in their mouths. While money is necessary to finance certain features of democracy, public policy can never be for sale. That was the message in our recent Financing Democracy report -- a remarkable piece with a focus on the funding of political parties and election campaigns and the risk of policy capture. 2016 must be the year of implementation. We need to make good on what we said we would do last year: chart a credible path and monitor our progress towards achieving the SDGs; deliver on our commitments to reducing emissions and transitioning towards lower carbon economies; close once and for all the international loopholes that wealthy individuals and powerful companies use to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. Now is the time for collective action -- for promoting stronger and more inclusive growth; for reducing inequality gaps; for integrating the refugees knocking on our doors; for giving hope to the next generation.
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The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie

The sugar conspiracy | Ian Leslie | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Robert Lustig is a paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California who specialises in the treatment of childhood obesity. A 90-minute talk he gave in 2009, titled Sugar: The Bitter Truth, has now been viewed more than six million times on YouTube. In it, Lustig argues forcefully that fructose, a form of sugar ubiquitous in modern diets, is a “poison” culpable for America’s obesity epidemic.

A year or so before the video was posted, Lustig gave a similar talk to a conference of biochemists in Adelaide, Australia. Afterwards, a scientist in the audience approached him. Surely, the man said, you’ve read Yudkin. Lustig shook his head. John Yudkin, said the scientist, was a British professor of nutrition who had sounded the alarm on sugar back in 1972, in a book called Pure, White, and Deadly.

“If only a small fraction of what we know about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in relation to any other material used as a food additive,” wrote Yudkin, “that material would promptly be banned.” The book did well, but Yudkin paid a high price for it. Prominent nutritionists combined with the food industry to destroy his reputation, and his career never recovered. He died, in 1995, a disappointed, largely forgotten man.

Perhaps the Australian scientist intended a friendly warning. Lustig was certainly putting his academic reputation at risk when he embarked on a high-profile campaign against sugar. But, unlike Yudkin, Lustig is backed by a prevailing wind. We read almost every week of new research into the deleterious effects of sugar on our bodies. In the US, the latest edition of the government’s official dietary guidelines includes a cap on sugar consumption. In the UK, the chancellor George Osborne has announced a new tax on sugary drinks. Sugar has become dietary enemy number one.

This represents a dramatic shift in priority. For at least the last three decades, the dietary arch-villain has been saturated fat. When Yudkin was conducting his research into the effects of sugar, in the 1960s, a new nutritional orthodoxy was in the process of asserting itself. Its central tenet was that a healthy diet is a low-fat diet. Yudkin led a diminishing band of dissenters who believed that sugar, not fat, was the more likely cause of maladies such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes. But by the time he wrote his book, the commanding heights of the field had been seized by proponents of the fat hypothesis. Yudkin found himself fighting a rearguard action, and he was defeated.
Sugar tax: Osborne's two-tier levy brings mixed response
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Not just defeated, in fact, but buried. When Lustig returned to California, he searched for Pure, White and Deadly in bookstores and online, to no avail. Eventually, he tracked down a copy after submitting a request to his university library. On reading Yudkin’s introduction, he felt a shock of recognition.

“Holy crap,” Lustig thought. “This guy got there 35 years before me.”
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Robert Lustig is a paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California who specialises in the treatment of childhood obesity. A 90-minute talk he gave in 2009, titled Sugar: The Bitter Truth, has now been viewed more than six million times on YouTube. In it, Lustig argues forcefully that fructose, a form of sugar ubiquitous in modern diets, is a “poison” culpable for America’s obesity epidemic. A year or so before the video was posted, Lustig gave a similar talk to a conference of biochemists in Adelaide, Australia. Afterwards, a scientist in the audience approached him. Surely, the man said, you’ve read Yudkin. Lustig shook his head. John Yudkin, said the scientist, was a British professor of nutrition who had sounded the alarm on sugar back in 1972, in a book called Pure, White, and Deadly. “If only a small fraction of what we know about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in relation to any other material used as a food additive,” wrote Yudkin, “that material would promptly be banned.” The book did well, but Yudkin paid a high price for it. Prominent nutritionists combined with the food industry to destroy his reputation, and his career never recovered. He died, in 1995, a disappointed, largely forgotten man. Perhaps the Australian scientist intended a friendly warning. Lustig was certainly putting his academic reputation at risk when he embarked on a high-profile campaign against sugar. But, unlike Yudkin, Lustig is backed by a prevailing wind. We read almost every week of new research into the deleterious effects of sugar on our bodies. In the US, the latest edition of the government’s official dietary guidelines includes a cap on sugar consumption. In the UK, the chancellor George Osborne has announced a new tax on sugary drinks. Sugar has become dietary enemy number one. This represents a dramatic shift in priority. For at least the last three decades, the dietary arch-villain has been saturated fat. When Yudkin was conducting his research into the effects of sugar, in the 1960s, a new nutritional orthodoxy was in the process of asserting itself. Its central tenet was that a healthy diet is a low-fat diet. Yudkin led a diminishing band of dissenters who believed that sugar, not fat, was the more likely cause of maladies such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes. But by the time he wrote his book, the commanding heights of the field had been seized by proponents of the fat hypothesis. Yudkin found himself fighting a rearguard action, and he was defeated. Sugar tax: Osborne's two-tier levy brings mixed response Read more Not just defeated, in fact, but buried. When Lustig returned to California, he searched for Pure, White and Deadly in bookstores and online, to no avail. Eventually, he tracked down a copy after submitting a request to his university library. On reading Yudkin’s introduction, he felt a shock of recognition. “Holy crap,” Lustig thought. “This guy got there 35 years before me.”
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Chinese Link to ‘Panama Papers’ Widens

Chinese Link to ‘Panama Papers’ Widens | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
A new report citing leaked documents adds a handful more names to the list of senior Chinese political figures with relatives identified as clients of a Panamanian law firm who have set up or invested in companies incorporated in offshore tax havens.
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BEIJING—A new report citing leaked documents adds a handful more names to the list of senior Chinese political figures with relatives identified as clients of a Panamanian law firm who have set up or invested in companies incorporated in offshore tax havens. A report by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists on Wednesday linked relatives of two current members of the Communist Party leadership—Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli and Liu Yunshan, who oversees propaganda and ideology—to offshore commercial activities conducted through law firm Mossack Fonseca & Co. The report didn’t accuse any individual or organization of wrongdoing. The ICIJ reported the names of members of elite party families identified as directors or shareholders of offshore companies. Among them are relatives of Chinese revolutionary patriarch Mao Zedong and former party chief Hu Yaobang, both deceased, as well as former Vice President Zeng Qinghong. The disclosures etch in details the lifestyles that many Chinese assume families of upper-echelon party members lead, and, thus, analysts said, are likely to fuel public cynicism about official corruption. While an anticorruption campaign launched by Xi Jinping, the president and party chief, is widely popular, many Chinese also see it as a tool for settling political scores. A brother-in-law of Mr. Xi is also named in the leaked documents as a shareholder of offshore firms, as reported earlier this week by the ICIJ. Since foreign media reports citing the documents, known as the Panama Papers, emerged this week, Chinese censors have worked to scrub domestic news sites and social media of mentions of any China connection.
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Steeds meer Nederlanders in te dure woning

Steeds meer Nederlanders in te dure woning | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Steeds meer Nederlanders wonen in een huis dat eigenlijk te duur voor ze is. Het gaat om 18 procent van de huishoudens. Zes jaar geleden ging het nog maar om acht procent. Dat blijkt uit cijfers van het CBS.
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tulp-Collected works of Marlene - All Rijksstudio's - Rijksstudio - Rijksmuseum

tulp-Collected works of Marlene - All Rijksstudio's - Rijksstudio - Rijksmuseum | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
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Tulips for Mary ;-)
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