Semantic Gnosis Web
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Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center

Innovation under Austerity - Transcript - Software Freedom Law Center | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.
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Firm: Facebook's shadow profiles are 'frightening' dossiers on everyone | ZDNet

Firm: Facebook's shadow profiles are 'frightening' dossiers on everyone | ZDNet | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

Facebook's shadow profile data collection activities came to light Friday when the social network disclosed a bug fix.

The security researchers who found the vulnerability, Packet Storm Security, say Facebook is compiling "frightening" dossiers on everyone possible, including people without Facebook accounts.
facebook shadow profile

Last week, Packet Storm discovered Facebook's vulnerability and contacted Facebook.

After extended dialogue with Facebook the researchers were compelled to reflect that, "The issue itself was not built with malice in mind it was simply an oversight. The significance of what it unearthed is the real problem that still remains."

Since 2012, Facebook had unintentionally combined user's shadow profiles with their Facebook profiles and shared it with those users' friends who used Facebook's Download Your Information (DYI) tool.

If only Facebook had explained the bug as clearly as Packet Storm in its post Facebook: Where Your Friends Are Your Worst Enemies:

When you open the downloaded archive, there is a file inside called addressbook.html. This file is supposed to house the contact information you uploaded.

However, due to a flaw in how Facebook implemented this, it also housed contact information from other uploads other users have performed for the same person, provided you had one piece of matching data, effectively building large dossiers on people.

In our testing, we found that uploading one public email address for an individual could reap a dozen additional pieces of contact information.

It should also be noted that the collection of this information goes for all of the data uploaded, regardless of whether or not your contacts are Facebook users.

Most people who found out they have a 'shadow profile' with contact info they never gave to Facebook - such as telephone numbers - were surprised and angry.

Facebook responded Sunday pointing to a page on its address book email collection policy and emphasizing that the data is uploaded voluntarily by people the users know.

Updated with Facebook's response: Anger mounts after Facebook's 'shadow profiles' leak in bug

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The real alarm rose when Packet Storm began to comprehend what this meant for the individual user - and what happened when the security researchers approached Facebook with its concrete fears:

The fact that I have no control over additional email addresses and phone numbers added to their data store on me is frightening. The questions we asked were very to the point but carefully constructed to reflect an equal balance between usability and user safety.

(...) Our first question asked that, in the name of common decency and privacy, would Facebook ever commit to automatically discarding information of individuals that do not have a known Facebook account? Possibly age it out X days if they don't respond to an invite due to a friend uploading their information without their knowledge?

Their response was essentially that they think of contacts imported by a user as the user's data and they are allowed to do with it what they want.

To clarify, it's not your data, it's your friends. We went on to ask them if Facebook would commit to having a privacy setting that dictates Facebook will automatically delete any and all data uploaded about me via third parties ("friends") if it's not in scope with what I've shared on my profile (and by proxy, is out of band from my privacy settings)?

We were basically met with the same reasoning as above and in their wording they actually went as far as claiming that it would be a freedom of speech violation.

Standing on its policy, Facebook is refusing to allow users to have control over their own personal information.

Facebook policy in this area is that your data is not yours; it belongs to your friends, and by its rules your friends - or merely peple you know - have more control over your data than you do.

Packet Storm praised Facebook for acting swiftly to patch the bug.

The security company emphasized that it is not Facebook security that is broken, but instead it is Facebook policy that is broken, and their disclosure is not meant to cast a negative light on the company.

Packet Storm remarked, "It was clear that Facebook attacked the disclosure flaw properly, but concerns still remain about the fact that dossiers are being built on everyone possible."

"You can run, but you can't hide"

Right now commenters across the Internet will be saying, Don't join Facebook or Delete your account. But it appears that we're subject to Facebook's shadow profiles whether or not we choose to participate.

I feel like we're only beginning to understand why Facebook's data is so very valuable to advertisers, governments, app makers and malicious entities.

Packet Storm wrote,

It is now publicly known that Facebook has all of this correlated information (or if it's not now, it can be) and everyone (read: governments and criminals alike) are going to aim for it, whether legally or illegally.

Facebook claims they will not disclose this additional information to the government when requests are received, but it still has the world's largest target painted on it asking for trouble.

Packet Storm thinks legislation is the answer. "What we need are governments to enact legislation that forces the hand, but given recent news items in the United States, it is clear that not all governments are making this a top priority."

We are well aware right now that our laws are woefully inept when it comes to keeping up with data privacy.

Some of us hope that this is an oversight that will be corrected.

There are no protections against shadow profiling. Just like with so-called "people search" websites, we have no legal mandates with which we can identify and remove our information from their systems, no protections that guarantee an opt-out, and no recourse other than to say "no."

Let's hope that Facebook policy listens to the anger and fear they're inspiring right now, and that it means something.

Because if there was ever a time Facebook needs to do the right thing, it's now

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Snapshot Serengeti

Snapshot Serengeti | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
About Classify Profile Discuss Blog Authors August 25 2016 10:08 AM Fire No animals present Search Aardvark Genet Porcupine Aardwolf Giraffe Reedbuck Baboon Guinea fowl Reptiles Bat Hare Rhinoceros Bat-eared fox Hartebeest Rodents Bird (other) Hippopotamus Secretary bird Buffalo Honey-badger Serval Bushbuck Hyena (spotted) Steenbok Cattle Hyena (striped) Topi Caracal Impala Vervet monkey Cheetah Insect/Spider Vulture Civet Jackal Warthog Dik dik Kori bustard Waterbuck Duiker Leopard Wildcat Eland Lion (female or cub) Wildebeest Elephant Lion (male) Zebra Gazelle (Grant's) Mongoose Zorilla Gazelle (Thomson's) Ostrich Human
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Where in the world is my data and how secure is it? - BBC News

Where in the world is my data and how secure is it? - BBC News | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

When Max Schrems, an Austrian privacy activist, requested to see his personal data that Facebook stored on its servers, he was mailed a CD-ROM containing a 1,222-page document.
That file, which would stretch nearly a quarter of a mile if printed and laid end-to-end, offered a glimpse into Facebook's appetite for the private details of its 1.65 billion users.
The information included phone numbers and email addresses of Mr Schrems' friends and family; a history of all the devices he used to log in to the service; all the events he had been invited to; everyone he had "friended" (and subsequently de-friended); and an archive of his private messages.
It even included transcripts of messages he'd deleted.
But Mr Schrems, who says he only used Facebook occasionally over a three-year period, believes a sizeable chunk of information was withheld from him.

The more of our data that's out there scattered throughout the world, the more vulnerable it is to hackers, argues Mr Caudill - a supposition borne out by the fact that identity fraud is on the rise. As people continue to upload their digital information online, into a marsh of territorial legal complexities and undisclosed national security protocols, Prof Svantesson offers some practical advice - which many people still do not follow. "I would suggest never putting anything sensitive on the cloud, such as credit card information, or personal images that you don't want others to see. "Some things you should just leave to yourself," he advises.

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11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World

11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
More than a thousand robotics experts, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, signed a letter last summer warning against machines that can select targets without human control. We wanted to find out just how many of these things are in use around the world. But law enforcement isn’t exactly forthcoming about the topic, so this list is not exhaustive. Here’s what we found.
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Obama Says Experts Tie Russia to DNC Hacking

Obama Says Experts Tie Russia to DNC Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON—President Barack Obama for the first time tied Russia to a recent computer breach that penetrated the Democratic National Committee’s network, saying “experts” believe hackers from that country carried out the operation.

“I know that experts have attributed this to the Russians,” Mr. Obama said in an interview with NBC’s “Today Show” scheduled to air Wednesday morning. “What we do know is that the Russians hack our systems. Not just government systems, but private systems.”

He stopped short of alleging that Russian President Vladimir Putin was working to help Republican nominee Donald Trump win the White House by leaking thousands of emails stolen as part of the DNC files. Instead, he said the Federal Bureau of Investigation was still investigating the matter and suggested Russia would stand to benefit from a Trump victory.

“What the motives were in terms of the leaks, all that, I can’t say directly,” Mr. Obama said. “What I do know is that Donald Trump has repeatedly expressed admiration for Vladimir Putin.”
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Google: Today’s Encryption May Not Survive Tomorrow’s Attacks

It is ‘deja vu’ all over again as Google prepares for a future that seems inevitable. Like the millennium bug of the late 90s, Practical Quantum Computing looks like the next big turn in this era of internet security and encryption.
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Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey & Company

Where machines could replace humans--and where they can’t (yet) | McKinsey & Company | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

The technical potential for automation differs dramatically across sectors and activities.


As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines? In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. Automation, now going beyond routine manufacturing activities, has the potential, as least with regard to its technical feasibility, to transform sectors such as healthcare and finance, which involve a substantial share of knowledge work. From science fiction to business fact Video From science fiction to business fact McKinsey’s Michael Chui explains how automation is transforming work. These conclusions rest on our detailed analysis of 2,000-plus work activities for more than 800 occupations. Using data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics and O*Net, we’ve quantified both the amount of time spent on these activities across the economy of the United States and the technical feasibility of automating each of them. The full results, forthcoming in early 2017, will include several other countries,1 but we released some initial findings late last year and are following up now with additional interim results. Last year, we showed that currently demonstrated technologies could automate 45 percent of the activities people are paid to perform and that about 60 percent of all occupations could see 30 percent or more of their constituent activities automated, again with technologies available today. In this article, we examine the technical feasibility, using currently demonstrated technologies, of automating three groups of occupational activities: those that are highly susceptible, less susceptible, and least susceptible to automation. Within each category, we discuss the sectors and occupations where robots and other machines are most—and least—likely to serve as substitutes in activities humans currently perform. Toward the end of this article, we discuss how evolving technologies, such as natural-language generation, could change the outlook, as well as some implications for senior executives who lead increasingly automated enterprises. Understanding automation potential In discussing automation, we refer to the potential that a given activity could be automated by adopting currently demonstrated technologies, that is to say, whether or not the automation of that activity is technically feasible.2 Each whole occupation is made up of multiple types of activities, each with varying degrees of technical feasibility. Exhibit 1 lists seven top-level groupings of activities we have identified. Occupations in retailing, for example, involve activities such as collecting or processing data, interacting with customers, and setting up merchandise displays (which we classify as physical movement in a predictable environment). Since all of these constituent activities have a different automation potential, we arrive at an overall estimate for the sector by examining the time workers spend on each of them during the workweek. Exhibit 1 Technical feasibility is a necessary precondition for automation, but not a complete predictor that an activity will be automated. A second factor to consider is the cost of developing and deploying both the hardware and the software for automation. The cost of labor and related supply-and-demand dynamics represent a third factor: if workers are in abundant supply and significantly less expensive than automation, this could be a decisive argument against it. A fourth factor to consider is the benefits beyond labor substitution, including higher levels of output, better quality, and fewer errors. These are often larger than those of reducing labor costs. Regulatory and social-acceptance issues, such as the degree to which machines are acceptable in any particular setting, must also be weighed. A robot may, in theory, be able to replace some of the functions of a nurse, for example. But for now, the prospect that this might actually happen in a highly visible way could prove unpalatable for many patients, who expect human contact. The potential for automation to take hold in a sector or occupation reflects a subtle interplay between these factors and the trade-offs among them. Even when machines do take over some human activities in an occupation, this does not necessarily spell the end of the jobs in that line of work. On the contrary, their number at times increases in occupations that have been partly automated, because overall demand for their remaining activities has continued to grow. For example, the large-scale deployment of bar-code scanners and associated point-of-sale systems in the United States in the 1980s reduced labor costs per store by an estimated 4.5 percent and the cost of the groceries consumers bought by 1.4 percent.3 It also enabled a number of innovations, including increased promotions. But cashiers were still needed; in fact, their employment grew at an average rate of more than 2 percent between 1980 and 2013.

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So Hey You Should Stop Using Texts for Two-Factor Authentication

So Hey You Should Stop Using Texts for Two-Factor Authentication | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
A string of recent SMS hacks means security-conscious users should switch to a more secure login system.
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How the ‘insecurity of things’ creates the next wave of security opportunities

How the ‘insecurity of things’ creates the next wave of security opportunities | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Data from an HP IoT study shows that 80 percent of IoT devices failed to require passwords of sufficient complexity and length. As much as 70 percent of the devices did not encrypt communications. And 60 percent of these devices raised security concerns with their user interfaces. In an OpenDNS IoT study, 23 percent of respondents said they have no mitigating controls to prevent unauthorized device access in their company’s networks.

In an IoT security study conducted by Yokohama National University, researchers created an IoT honey pot, or an IoTPOT, to attract the bears. They found that Telnet-based attacks on IoT devices have rocketed since 2014. Telnet is a communication protocol that has no encryption or authentication. All data is transmitted in plain text. Yet a large number of industrial and scientific devices have only Telnet as a communication option.

Secure Shell protocol, or SSH, is a better option, but it increases bandwidth overload. And worse, some IoT devices cannot be configured to SSH, unless the interface appliance can be re-configured. With 70 percent of devices communicating in plain text, breaking in becomes easy.

New malware is being developed to target IoT.
Katsunari Yoshioka, who conducted the IoTPOT study, says, “Using an over-30-year-old insecure remote access service like Telnet for global access is technically simple and easy to fix. But the mass infections shows how many manufacturers do not really care, or do not know how to secure their products.”

Once hackers gain access to devices, the next step is infection of the device; the last step is monetization. Five distinct DDoS malware families targeting Telnet-enabled IoT devices have been invented. Your DVR has already being hacked and used as a botnet — you just don’t know it!

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North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News

North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Cities that want to make the move to open source should take the following steps:

1. Look for upcoming end-of-life or expiry of existing proprietary licenses as an opportunity to migrate away from them to something less expensive.

2. Look at the subscription model of some critical open source software as a way to move necessary purchases to an operating expense budget as opposed to a capital expenditure budget and eliminate large budget outlays for new or renewed proprietary software.

3. Prepare a reasonable transition plan that will accommodate any training and adjustment of staff to new applications.

4. Ensure when budgeting that the total cost of ownership is considered over the lifespan of the project and not just the upfront initial costs.

5. Use software that will allow IT to run both Windows and open source software side by side during the transition period.

6. Find the political willpower to get it done. This will require action by elected officials, but it may need leadership from IT to show them what can be done.

The move to open source is inevitable as open source communities of developers continue to work on thousands of applications and as more software development companies invest in an open source model to allow for greater flexibility and lower end user prices than existing proprietary competitors. Europe has more than a decade head start on North American cities. The quality of available open source software has improved so much in that decade that the transition can be far easier for cities starting now, than it was for Munich when they got the ball rolling in Europe.

Kevin Gallagher is CEO of Inuvika Inc., a Toronto based open source company that delivers application virtualization software. www.inuvika.com

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Khan Academy

Khan Academy | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Learn for free about math, art, computer programming, economics, physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, finance, history, and more. Khan Academy is a nonprofit with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.
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​Tor Is Teaming Up With Researchers To Protect Users From FBI Hacking

​Tor Is Teaming Up With Researchers To Protect Users From FBI Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
security, anonymity, Tor Browser, hacking, privacy, Selfrando, FBI, law enforcement, power, encryption, machines

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Richard Stallman: We're heading for a total disaster

The computer world is divided in two confronting camps with totally different philosophies. On the one side are companies that distribute programs unde
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Free as in FREEDOM
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Big Data, Coding, Security: 8 Sites That Offer Free Online Courses - InformationWeek

Big Data, Coding, Security: 8 Sites That Offer Free Online Courses - InformationWeek | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
IT pros need to stay updated on the latest trends in technology and management to remain relevant and competitive. Here's a look at eight online learning platforms that offer free tech courses that can help with that.
Via Collection of First, Anna
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The government wants to hear from you on the TPP

The government wants to hear from you on the TPP | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

Want to learn more about the TPP and how it affects Canadians? Check out some of the best analysis and news below:
Michael Geist: the case against ratifying the TPP
CCPA: The Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Promised Environmental Protections Do Not Deliver
Shopify CEO Tobi Lutke Criticizes TPP “I don’t think it’s a great idea to codify the current set of rules around intellectual property in an international treaty.”
RIM co-founder Jim Balsillie Warns TPP Could Cost Canada Billions
CCPA: TPP Will Cost Canada 58,000 Jobs, Won’t Grow Economy
The Trans-Pacific Partnership threatens the health of Canadians
TPP would let foreign investors bypass the Canadian public interest
Bad Medicine: Canadians will pay more for drugs and lose privacy under TPP
Why Internet Users Should be Very Angry about the TPP
How the TPP Will Affect You and Your Digital Rights
The TPP Hands Control Over Trade To The World's Wealthiest
The TPP Erodes Public Policy To Benefit The World's Plutocrats
Public Citizen: Secret TPP Text Unveiled: It's Worse than We Thought
Public Citizen: More Power to Corporations to Attack Nations
Sierra Club: New Report Reveals How the Trans-Pacific Partnership Threatens our Climate
ITUC: Statement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Use these outreach resources to send an email to your community
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Why 3D Printing Faces Cybersecurity Risks

Why 3D Printing Faces Cybersecurity Risks | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
3D printing seems to be the next big thing in technology. However, with technological advancements, there comes new cybersecurity risks.

Via NewsWatch TV
Jan Bergmans's insight:
You’ve certainly heard about 3D printing a lot lately. It seems to be the next big thing in technology. However, with technological advancements, there comes new cybersecurity risks — and 3D printing hasn’t escaped those. What Is 3D Printing? 3d3D printing takes a digital file and transforms it into a solid object. To start out, you have to design what you want to print on computer aided design (CAD) or animation modeling software. The program divides your design into cross-sections so the printer is able to complete it in layers. When you have a design you’re happy with, you send it to the printer. The 3D printer creates your design layer by layer in the material you choose. Materials also vary depending on the printer. The printer makes passes over the platform, transferring material from the printer onto the platform. Depending on how big you want your object, it can take hours or even days to complete. One of the ways 3D printing has changed the game is with prototypes. While injection molding used to be the standard, 3D printing has given it a run for its money. Each option — 3D printing and injection molding — has their strengths, but it can be beneficial to use both. To utilize the advantages of each method, there is a technique that can combine the two — leading to the speed and savings of 3D printing with the accuracy of injection molding. What Could Go Wrong? As more people start using this technology, the more security they’re going to need to monitor 3D printers. A team of researchers at NYU discovered that building something from a CAD file could then lead to issues with the product’s design. The printers could be hacked if they’re connected to the Internet while things are being printed. The most vulnerable issues are the printer’s orientation and the ability of hackers to insert fine defects into the body of an object being printed. The CAD files don’t specifically give instructions for orientation of the printer head. It’s possible, therefore, they could be changed without any detection. The defects would be inserted in between the printed layers of a product, and they wouldn’t be detected by the standard industry techniques that are currently used. Both of these could lead to some serious weaknesses in the printed objects — and they could be devastating. For instance, the aircraft industry has been using 3D printing for replacement parts, and a weakness in one of them could put everyone in the plane at risk. Auto manufacturers have been looking into the technology as well. What Can Be Done to Keep 3D Printing Safe? This problem showcases a need for new cybersecurity tools within the 3D printing industry. It also means that the methods of testing for defects and potential weaknesses in 3D printed products will need to be changed so they’re able to detect these kinds of issues. 3D printers could also use some sort of warning system when it appears an attack is happening. If you’re a manufacturer, avoid outsourcing your commercial printing to third parties if possible. They’re less trustworthy and could lead to potential sabotage of the product — as well as lawsuits and recalls. Internet-connected 3D printers go beyond this. Whenever you’re printing something, disconnect your printer from the Internet so hackers can’t get to what you’re making. In addition, encrypt your design files so they can’t be tampered with. It could be possible for companies to encrypt their designs so only their designated 3D printer would be able to read them. Another printer attempting to use the design wouldn’t be able to produce anything similar to the product. Technology is a wonderful thing, but the dangers of cybersecurity can’t be ignored. Make sure your 3D printed products are safe from the prying minds of hackers and take all of the precautions possible. It’s always better to be safe than sorry. About the Author: megannicholsMegan Nichols is the editor of Schooled by Science. She enjoys writing about the latest innovations in technology and science.
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Four Days to Save the Open Internet in Europe: An Open Letter

Four Days to Save the Open Internet in Europe: An Open Letter | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The post below is an open letter to European citizens, lawmakers and regulators, from our founder and Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Professor Barbara van Sc
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Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance

Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Bulgarian Parliament has passed amendments to its Electronic Governance Act which require all software written for the government to be open source.
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Emotional Education: An Introduction

Emotional Education: An Introduction | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
That we think so well of untrained intuition is because (without realising it) we are the inheritors of what can be summed up as a Romantic view of emotions. Starting in Europe in the 18th century and spreading widely and powerfully ever since, Romanticism is a movement of ideas that has been deeply committed to letting our emotions play a large and untampered role in our lives. Instead of nuancing or educating them (as earlier, Classical theories recommended), Romanticism has suggested that we learn to surrender to emotions with confidence and trust that they have much to teach us in their raw, untrammelled forms. If we feel joyful we shouldn’t necessarily try to analyse why. Reason can harm or distort feeling. If we are sad, we shouldn’t seek to moderate our passions. Anger should be vented, not bottled up; you should tell other people how you feel, without worrying about the consequences of emotional honesty. When choosing whom to love, you should be guided by instinct; it is the best way to choose a partner. Being true to feelings is, Romanticism insists, always a virtue. Romanticism was a deeply well-intentioned movement, but it has had some extremely tricky consequences, because attempting to navigate our emotional lives by intuition alone has to it some of the recklessness of trying to land a plane or perform a surgical operation without training. Our emotions, if left unexamined and unschooled, are liable to lead us into some profoundly counter-productive situations in regard to our love choices, our careers, our friendships and the management of our own moods. The task before us is therefore how we might acquire a set of emotional skills that could reliably contribute to a capacity for ‘emotional intelligence’. The term sounds odd. We are used to referring to intelligence without necessarily unpicking the many varieties of it a person might possess – and therefore do not tend to highlight the value of a very distinctive sort of intelligence which currently does not enjoy the prestige it should. Every sort of intelligence signals an ability to navigate well around a particular set of challenges: mathematical, linguistic, technical, commercial and so on… When we say that someone is clever but add that they have made a mess of their personal lives; or that they have acquired an astonishing amount of money but are very tricky to work with, we are pointing to a deficit in what deserves to be called emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the quality that enables us to negotiate with patience, insight and temperance the central problems in our relationships with others and with ourselves. It shows up around partnerships in a sensitivity to the moods of others, in a readiness to grasp what may be going on for them beyond the surface and to enter imaginatively into their point of view. It shows up in regard to ourselves when it comes to dealing with anger, envy, anxiety and professional confusion. And emotional intelligence is what distinguishes those who are crushed by failure from those who know how to greet the troubles of existence with a melancholy and at points darkly humorous resilience. At various points in the past, there have been forces at work which hoped to teach us emotional skills in systematic ways. They didn’t always do the job ideally well – but they did keep the general idea on the agenda. It is noteworthy that none of these forces are currently very powerful in our lives today. The first of these forces was religion. At their best religions sought to retrain, and improve, the quality of our customary emotional responses. In his Second Letter to the Corinthians, St Paul (the decisive figure in the development of all the Christian churches) sought to teach people to be ‘Slow to anger and quick to forgive’. The project was based on the wise assumption that better emotions are by nature highly teachable and that we are, of course, usually swift to fury and extremely stubborn about forgiving. Yet St Paul knew there might be another way – and believed that a retraining programme could belong to one of the central ambitions of his new religion. Therefore, for centuries, week by week, congregations were asked to reflect very seriously on their own failings to be humble rather than proud; to feel pity and tenderness in directions they normally wouldn’t consider and to refocus feelings of admiration away from worldly success and towards sacrifice and renunciation. The point isn’t to insist that churches were always successful at or ideally focused on emotional education – but to highlight that they were peculiarly and inspiringly devoted to trying. The capacity for churches to keep up this project has now badly withered. Religion may still be a major force in the world but it suffers from the insurmountable drawback that it is perceived as being built upon incredible suppositions; it simply feels too strange to a great many sensible people to believe that a cosmic deity might be in control of the destiny of human beings and yet, for reasons we are not equipped to fully comprehend, would allow the world to roll on in endless, grotesque suffering. However nice some aspects of its emotional education programme might be, religion cannot now be a force suited to conveying it. When religion first declined in the West in the 19th century, a widespread assumption was that universities could take up some of the slack. Culture could replace scripture. But these hopes too have been conclusively betrayed. A range of academic subjects – philosophy, history, literature – are in principle highly connected to the task of educating our emotional lives; they capture the course of human experience in all its complexities – and the leading universities have often been hugely well resourced and housed in majestic settings. From the outside they have looked like places that would have the authority and the opportunity to help individuals and even whole societies becomes emotionally wise. But, this grand promise has been tragically undercut (or, more bluntly, betrayed) by an academic obsession with abstraction and obscurity. If an individual turned up at one of the great universities frankly asking for help, they would be regarded as deranged and forcibly removed. A similar betrayal has happened around art museums. Here too the hope was that these could take over some of the tasks of religion: that museums could become our new cathedrals. The great galleries of the world may sometimes look the part, but close up they harbour no comparable ambitions to guide and elevate us. Cathedrals were intended to provide very specific courses in emotional education and guidance, taking us in ordered stages through a process of training leading to a specific and admired conclusion. No such ambitions attend galleries. One would be equally unwise to show up in sorrow at a museum asking for help in knowing how to live and die well. The idea of emotional education therefore remains at once deeply relevant and widely neglected. The challenge before us is to break down emotional intelligence into a range of skills, a curriculum of emotional skills, that are at work in wise and temperate lives. We should be ready to embark on a systematic educational programme in an area that has for too long, unfairly and painfully, seemed like a realm of intuition and luck.
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The Next Office Is Outside

The Next Office Is Outside | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Who says going to work has to mean sitting at a cubicle all day? Coming this summer Popices will be setting up outdoor offices all across Amsterdam.
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US Customs wants to collect social media account names at the border

US Customs wants to collect social media account names at the border | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Your Twitter handle may soon be part of the US visa process. Yesterday, US Customs and Border Protection entered a new proposal into the federal register, suggesting a new field in which persons entering the country can declare their various social media accounts and screen names. The information wouldn’t be mandatory, but the proposed field would still provide customs officials with an unprecedented window into the online life of travelers. The process already includes fingerprinting, an in-person interview, and numerous database checks.

The proposal focuses on arrival / departure forms commonly collected from non-citizens at the US border, as well as the electronic form used for anyone entering the country under a visa waiver. Under the proposed changes, those forms would include a new optional data field prompting visitors to "please enter information associated with your online presence," followed by open fields for specific platforms and screen names.

It’s unclear from the proposal how thoroughly officials will examine the social profiles, although it’s clear they will be used for investigative purposes. "Collecting social media data will enhance the existing investigative process and provide DHS greater clarity and visibility to possible nefarious activity and connections," the announcement reads.

The public has 60 days to comment on the new proposal before it will be formally considered. Comments can be mailed to Customs and Border Protection at its Washington office.

Immigration and intelligence agencies have been under increasing pressure to scrutinize social media profiles after the San Bernardino shooting in December of last year. One of the attackers had posted a public announcement on Facebook during the shooting, and had previously sent private Facebook messages to friends discussing violent attacks. Crucially, the private messages were sent before receiving her visa. That news provoked some criticism, although investigators would have needed significantly more than a screen name to see the messages. State Department officials claimed to be reviewing the visa application processes in the wake of the attacks.

VIATHE HILL JOSEPH LORENZO HALL (TWITTER)
SOURCEFEDERAL REGISTER
RELATED ITEMS SOCIAL MEDIA HOMELAND SECURITY
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The Muse raises $16 million for its next-gen career site

The Muse raises $16 million for its next-gen career site | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Muse, a New York-based career site that offers job opportunities, skill-building courses, coaching, and video profiles meant to show what it’s like to work at different companies, has raised $16 million in Series B funding led by Icon Ventures. Earlier backers Aspect Ventures, DBL Partners and QED Investors also joined the round, which brings funding for the 4.5-year-old startup to $28.7 million.

Co-founder and CEO Kathryn Minshew says the platform’s users are largely women — 65 percent of them, in fact — with 50 percent of users below age 30, another quarter of them in their 30s, and the rest age 40 and over. That’s apparently been good for business. “When women find The Muse,” says Minshew, “they’ll come back and tell us, ‘We told 15 people,'” about the platform.

What’s also good for business is LinkedIn’s announced sale last week to Microsoft for a stunning $26.2 billion, says Minshew. We talked yesterday about why the acquisition bodes well for The Muse, as well as what the company is building right now that could double its size.
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Transgender man bevalt van dochter

Transgender man bevalt van dochter | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
In IJsland is een 19-jarige transgender man bevallen van een meisje. Kort nadat hij besloot om door het leven te gaan als man, ontdekte hij da
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Future Of Hacking

Future Of Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Internet we know today is only one possible interpretation of the original vision of an open, peer-to-peer network. Think of it as a first-generation Internet, built on a fragile global network of vulnerable codes subject to abuse and even collapse. This Internet is failing from too close an encounter with a triple shock: a…
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The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards

The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The European Commission Wants You To Log Into Social Media Accounts With Govt-Issued ID Cards
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The Vice President for the Digital Single Market on the European Commission, former Communist Andrus Ansip, is behind the next European Union (EU) raid on personal freedoms, promoting the idea of using national ID cards to log in to online services. Leaked documents from within the European Commission revealed a call for the roll out of a more extensive use of national ID cards across the EU. The documents have since been uploaded to the Commission’s own website. Mr. Ansip is from Estonia, a small Baltic country and former Communist state which has the most highly-developed national ID card system in the world. The Estonian state website boasts: “Much more than simply a legal picture ID, the mandatory national card serves as the digital access card for all of Estonia’s secure e-services.” The paper outlines that: “In particular, online platforms need to accept credentials issued or recognised by national public authorities, such as electronic ID cards, citizens cards, bank cards or mobile IDs… for every consumer to have a multitude of username and password combinations is not only inconvenient but becomes a security risk.” This draft document entitled ‘Online Platforms and the Digital Single Market’ is dated 25 May this year, and urges the log in policy on the basis that fake user reviews are misleading European consumers. The document states: “Online ratings and reviews of goods and services are helpful and empowering to consumers, but they need to be trustworthy and free from any bias or manipulation. A prominent example is fake reviews, where loss of trust can undermine the business model of the platform itself, but also lead to a wider loss of trust, as expressed in many responses to the public consultation Breitbart London has previously reported on how the European Union plans to roll out a continent-wide ID card, with a view to using the data to impose Europe-wide taxes, and an EU-wide minimum wage, further bypassing elected national parliaments and handing more power to the unelected bureaucrats in Brussels. The European Commission website further reveals that “on 1 July 2016, the new rules on trust services under the eIDAS Regulation will come into effect in the 28 EU Member States repealing the 15-year-old eSignature Directive and modernising the legal framework for trust services. This will be a turning point in the eIDAS journey and another big milestone towards a Digital Single Market.” It does not appear to be mandatory, but uptake of national E-ID cards is encouraged by the Commission as the direction of travel for access to e-services. It does, however, define and regulate the legal basis for digital IDs for Europeans. “This intrusive and seemingly authoritarian EU interference in social media and the internet is not new,” said Diane James, a Member of the European Parliament and the UK Independence Party’s spokesman for Home Affairs. “In 2013, the European Parliament spent almost £2 million on press monitoring and trawling Eurosceptic debates on the internet for “trolls” during euro-elections amid fears that hostility to the EU was growing.
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