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Snowden Live

Snowden Live | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Thank you to Edward Snowden and our other privacy friends and journalists for an amazing event!
SNOWDEN LIVE
Your searches are your business. Change to the world’s most private search engine today: Add to Firefox Set as Home

Outside the Theater Tuschinski in Amsterdam, where the event was held. Photo by Ilse Brouwer.

Inside the Theater Tuschinski during Snowden’s Q&A. Photo by Samuel van Leuwen.

StartPage CEO Robert Beens (left) with Phil Zimmerman, the inventor of PGP encryption. Photo by Alex van Eesteren.
About the Event
What does privacy mean to you?

Snowden Live was an exclusive post-election livestream Q&A with Edward Snowden on Thursday, November 10, 2016. The world’s most famous whistleblower addressed many topics, including the future of privacy under newly elected US President Donald Trump.

Snowden became world famous after he handed journalists classified documents detailing the global espionage activities of the United States National Security Agency (NSA). His exposure of covert government surveillance put privacy firmly on the map, but also put him at great risk. Snowden was forced to flee the US in 2013 to avoid arrest and currently resides in Russia, where he has been given asylum.

Following are just some of the highlights of the historic Q&A that was broadcast from the Pathé Tuschinski in Amsterdam where Snowden was patched in to our live theater audience via satellite transmission from Moscow. More will follow soon.
Press Coverage

Here are just a few of the dozens of stories written by the press about the Snowden event. We will be adding more. While we don’t have the rights to archive the full Snowden event yet, you will find excellent photos and video in some of these articles.
https://www.rt.com/usa/366364-edward-snowden-election-speech/
http://www.ibtimes.com/edward-snowden-livestream-whistleblower-discuss-donald-trump-privacy-2444989
http://observer.com/2016/11/neither-hope-for-an-obama-nor-fear-a-trump-snowden-said-today/
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/10/edward-snowden-extradition-vladimi-putin-trump-russia
http://time.com/4567722/edward-snowden-donald-trump/

Stay tuned. More to come.
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All your computers are belong to us: the dystopian future of security is now | TurnKey GNU/Linux Blog

I followed the Snowden revelations closely and even read Grenn Greendwald's "No Place to Hide", but still the extent of this was news to me. Apparently after 911 an NSA program called "Sentry Owl" successfully coerced major US PC companies into co-designing hardware level rootkits into their products.

By 2006 the new generation of Intel hardware came with Intel ME ("Management Engine"), the secret computer within your computer pre-installed.

The ME has a full network stack with its own MAC that works even when your computer is turned off and has direct access to RAM and you all hard drives / peripherals. It's a 5MB proprietary encrypted blackbox that was designed to be extensible while being extremely hard to reverse engineer. The ME CPU runs its own custom non-x86 instruction set (ARC), the firmware is compressed with a custom designed compression algorithm, and all code is signed and encrypted. Intel is extremely uncooperative with anyone that wants details on how this thing works, including big customers like Google.

If you wanted to design a universal hardware backdoor that is embedded into all PCs this is how you would do it.

The people who seem to know the most about Intel ME outside of the intelligence community are the free software "nuts" attempting to develop a free (free as in free speech) boot process:

https://libreboot.org/faq/#intel

Unfortunately, the latest generation of AMD hardware (post-2013) has its own version of Intel ME called the AMD PSP (Platform Security Processor) which isn't any better:

https://libreboot.org/faq/#amd

For people that want a computer that isn't backdoored at the hardware level libreboot recommends not using modern hardware at all. Yikes!

Intel ME and the AMD PSP have the NSA's fingerprints all over it. I would be very very surprised if it turned out NOT to be designed (or at least co-designed) with the concerns of US intelligence capabilities in mind.

Unfortunately, that's a problem even if you trust the NSA not to abuse their powers, because  as one 29-year old former NSA contractor armed with a thumbdrive showed - the NSA's security isn't all that great.

Even those who think it's wise to trust the NSA would probably think twice about trusting the legions of private contractors it depends on to run its mass warrantless surveillance programs.

Even worse, according to experts like Bruce Schneier the game of cyber-espionage is all offense, no defense. In other words, foreign intelligence agencies most likely already had all the documents Snowden leaked because they were already in the NSA's systems.

So now you also have to trust not just the NSA, but the Russian FSB, the Chinese Cyberarmy, and potentially anyone working for them in past, present and future.

Now I get why the Chinese are developing their own CPUs, why the Russians and Germans are reverting to typewriters and paper for classified information, and what a top US intelligence officials means when he says:

I know how deep we are in our enemies's networks without them having any idea that we're there. I'm worried that our networks are penetrated just as deeply
The only saving grace is that given the risk of detection, political fallout and attack devaluation, I reckon advanced attackers regard hardware level backdoors as the tools of last resort and only against high-value targets. For the little guys, they'll prefer plausibly deniable exploits in endpoint software that were either accidentally or maliciously inserted. And yes, part of Sentry Owl and similar programs by other intelligence agencies involves inserting undercover agents into private companies and presumably into open source projects like Debian and Ubuntu as well.

Bottom line: options for a someone who wants a computer and get reasonable assurance that it cannot be remotely controlled at the hardware level when connected to the Internet are virtually non-existent.

You can raise the bar a little bit without sacrificing too much comfort with products like those from Purism:

https://puri.sm/products/

Features I like:

No binary blob drivers (which I'm certain are ALL backdoored)
hardware cut-off switches for RF, wireless and camera
Qubes OS certified / pre-installation option
https://www.qubes-os.org/news/2015/12/09/purism-partnership/

Stuff I don't like:

No free BIOS/firmware yet: https://puri.sm/posts/bios-freedom-status/
Intel based so is still includes (like ALL post-2006 Intel hardware) on Intel hardware-level backdoor called the "Management Engine".
Possibly the closest thing you can get to a free computer at the hardware and software level is by buying old refurbished hardware directly from the libreboot guys:

https://minifree.org/

Unfortunately, you'll need to pay dearly for freedom. The laptop hardware was cutting edge in 2008. The server/workstation board is better since it took AMD longer to get on the backdoor bandwagon.

Also, given the well established practice of intercepting hardware in-route to install implants, if you don't have the skills to inspect hardware yourself, you can you know supposedly clean hardware hasn't been tampered with en route?

Paranoia, justified or not, is a tough hobby.
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Hackers Used New Weapons to Disrupt Major Websites Across U.S.

Hackers Used New Weapons to Disrupt Major Websites Across U.S. | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — Major websites were inaccessible to people across wide swaths of the United States on Friday after a company that manages crucial parts of the internet’s infrastructure said it was under attack.

Users reported sporadic problems reaching several websites, including Twitter, Netflix, Spotify, Airbnb, Reddit, Etsy, SoundCloud and The New York Times.

The company, Dyn, whose servers monitor and reroute internet traffic, said it began experiencing what security experts called a distributed denial-of-service attack just after 7 a.m. Reports that many sites were inaccessible started on the East Coast, but spread westward in three waves as the day wore on and into the evening.

And in a troubling development, the attack appears to have relied on hundreds of thousands of internet-connected devices like cameras, baby monitors and home routers that have been infected — without their owners’ knowledge — with software that allows hackers to command them to flood a target with overwhelming traffic.

Continue reading the main story
A spokeswoman said the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Homeland Security were looking into the incident and all potential causes, including criminal activity and a nation-state attack.

Kyle York, Dyn’s chief strategist, said his company and others that host the core parts of the internet’s infrastructure were targets for a growing number of more powerful attacks.

“The number and types of attacks, the duration of attacks and the complexity of these attacks are all on the rise,” Mr. York said.

Security researchers have long warned that the increasing number of devices being hooked up to the internet, the so-called Internet of Things, would present an enormous security issue. And the assault on Friday, security researchers say, is only a glimpse of how those devices can be used for online attacks.

Dyn, based in Manchester, N.H., said it had fended off the assault by 9:30 a.m. But by 11:52 a.m., Dyn said it was again under attack. After fending off the second wave of attacks, Dyn said at 5 p.m. that it was again facing a flood of traffic.

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De Florijn | rentevrij

Florijn is een betaalmiddel, net als de Euro. De bedoeling is dus dat u er zoveel mogelijk mee gaat betalen. En nog zo min mogelijk met de Euro.De Euro blijft gewoon de Euro, Florijn is niet bedoeld om de Euro te vervangen. Er komt gewoon een munt bij. Florijn is een zogenaamde complementaire munt, die náást de officiële munt circuleert.Het doel van Florijn is om naast de Euro een extra geldstroom te genereren, waardoor de omzet en liquiditeit van bedrijven wordt vergroot en de koopkracht van consumenten wordt versterkt. Kortom, om de financiële crisis op te lossen. Het is mogelijk.Het probleem is dat er te weinig geld is, dus maken we ons eigen geld: het Florijn-netwerk biedt bedrijven (en op termijn waarschijnlijk ook consumenten) rentevrij krediet. Dit kan de kapitaalschaarste binnen het midden- en kleinbedrijf oplossen en dus enorme positieve gevolgen voor de reële economie hebben. Florijnen blijven namelijk binnen het netwerk circuleren, terwijl Euro’s in de vorm van rente naar de banken verdwijnen.Het nut van complementaire munten heeft zich bijvoorbeeld bewezen in Zwitserland, waar het bedrijfsleven al 80 jaar naast de Zwitserse Frank gebruik maakt van de WIR, en in Bristol, waar de locale economie dankzij de Bristol Pound helemaal opbloeit.Help de crisis oplossen, open een Florijn-rekening en ga ermee betalen.
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How To Delete Your Facebook Account Permanently

Backup your Facebook data
Before saying goodbye to your Facebook life, you should backup your data in case you need it at a later point in time.

Go to Settings.
While in the General tab. Click Download a copy of your Facebook data.
Click Start My Archive.

Enter your Facebook account password. Click Submit.
Click Start My Archive in the Request My Download box.
Facebook will then gather all your data and send the copy to your registered email address.

How to deactivate your Facebook account?
It’s simple. You might be thinking why I am telling you such simple thing. If you know how to deactivate your Facebook account, it’s good. But some people might not be aware of this. Here are the steps to deactivate your Facebook account:

Go to Settings.
Click Security in the left pane.
Click Deactivate your account.

How to delete your Facebook account permanently?
One thing that most users want to know is how to delete Facebook account permanently. For this, follow the steps:

Log into your Facebook account.
Visit this link, https://www.facebook.com/help/delete_account
Click Delete My Account.

I can’t go further as I don’t want to delete my Facebook account. So, go ahead yourself.
Important things to consider before deleting your Facebook account
Make sure you’ve downloaded a copy of your Facebook data before deactivating or permanently deleting it. You might be aware of the fact that you can gain access to your Facebook account after you’ve deactivated it. But be careful, you won’t get the chance to change your mind after you’ve deleted your Facebook account permanently. So, take your decision wisely.

It will take 90 days for Facebook to delete all your photos, videos, posts, likes, comments, messages, and everything else. Other Facebook users won’t be able to visit your profile during the deletion process. However, the text messages, images you’ve sent to your friends via chat will reside at their end because they’re a part of their account also. You can ask them to delete your messages.

Also Read: Using Facebook At Work May Slowdown Your Nation’s Economy
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Backup your Facebook data Before saying goodbye to your Facebook life, you should backup your data in case you need it at a later point in time. Go to Settings. While in the General tab. Click Download a copy of your Facebook data. Click Start My Archive. download copy of facebook data Enter your Facebook account password. Click Submit. Click Start My Archive in the Request My Download box. Facebook will then gather all your data and send the copy to your registered email address. How to deactivate your Facebook account? It’s simple. You might be thinking why I am telling you such simple thing. If you know how to deactivate your Facebook account, it’s good. But some people might not be aware of this. Here are the steps to deactivate your Facebook account: Go to Settings. Click Security in the left pane. Click Deactivate your account. facebook account deactivate How to delete your Facebook account permanently? One thing that most users want to know is how to delete Facebook account permanently. For this, follow the steps: Log into your Facebook account. Visit this link, https://www.facebook.com/help/delete_account Click Delete My Account. facebook account delete I can’t go further as I don’t want to delete my Facebook account. So, go ahead yourself. Important things to consider before deleting your Facebook account Make sure you’ve downloaded a copy of your Facebook data before deactivating or permanently deleting it. You might be aware of the fact that you can gain access to your Facebook account after you’ve deactivated it. But be careful, you won’t get the chance to change your mind after you’ve deleted your Facebook account permanently. So, take your decision wisely. It will take 90 days for Facebook to delete all your photos, videos, posts, likes, comments, messages, and everything else. Other Facebook users won’t be able to visit your profile during the deletion process. However, the text messages, images you’ve sent to your friends via chat will reside at their end because they’re a part of their account also. You can ask them to delete your messages. Also Read: Using Facebook At Work May Slowdown Your Nation’s Economy
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Gulf Capital - Leading Alternative Investment Company in the Gulf || Home

Gulf Capital - Leading Alternative Investment Company in the Gulf || Home | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Gulf Capital is a leading alternative investment company focusing primarily on late-stage control buy-outs, growth capital and real estate development.
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Richard Stallman: We're heading for a total disaster

The computer world is divided in two confronting camps with totally different philosophies. On the one side are companies that distribute programs unde
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Free as in FREEDOM
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Big Data, Coding, Security: 8 Sites That Offer Free Online Courses - InformationWeek

Big Data, Coding, Security: 8 Sites That Offer Free Online Courses - InformationWeek | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
IT pros need to stay updated on the latest trends in technology and management to remain relevant and competitive. Here's a look at eight online learning platforms that offer free tech courses that can help with that.
Via Collection of First, Anna
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The government wants to hear from you on the TPP

The government wants to hear from you on the TPP | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

Want to learn more about the TPP and how it affects Canadians? Check out some of the best analysis and news below:
Michael Geist: the case against ratifying the TPP
CCPA: The Trans-Pacific Partnership’s Promised Environmental Protections Do Not Deliver
Shopify CEO Tobi Lutke Criticizes TPP “I don’t think it’s a great idea to codify the current set of rules around intellectual property in an international treaty.”
RIM co-founder Jim Balsillie Warns TPP Could Cost Canada Billions
CCPA: TPP Will Cost Canada 58,000 Jobs, Won’t Grow Economy
The Trans-Pacific Partnership threatens the health of Canadians
TPP would let foreign investors bypass the Canadian public interest
Bad Medicine: Canadians will pay more for drugs and lose privacy under TPP
Why Internet Users Should be Very Angry about the TPP
How the TPP Will Affect You and Your Digital Rights
The TPP Hands Control Over Trade To The World's Wealthiest
The TPP Erodes Public Policy To Benefit The World's Plutocrats
Public Citizen: Secret TPP Text Unveiled: It's Worse than We Thought
Public Citizen: More Power to Corporations to Attack Nations
Sierra Club: New Report Reveals How the Trans-Pacific Partnership Threatens our Climate
ITUC: Statement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Use these outreach resources to send an email to your community
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Why 3D Printing Faces Cybersecurity Risks

Why 3D Printing Faces Cybersecurity Risks | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
3D printing seems to be the next big thing in technology. However, with technological advancements, there comes new cybersecurity risks.

Via NewsWatch TV
Jan Bergmans's insight:
You’ve certainly heard about 3D printing a lot lately. It seems to be the next big thing in technology. However, with technological advancements, there comes new cybersecurity risks — and 3D printing hasn’t escaped those. What Is 3D Printing? 3d3D printing takes a digital file and transforms it into a solid object. To start out, you have to design what you want to print on computer aided design (CAD) or animation modeling software. The program divides your design into cross-sections so the printer is able to complete it in layers. When you have a design you’re happy with, you send it to the printer. The 3D printer creates your design layer by layer in the material you choose. Materials also vary depending on the printer. The printer makes passes over the platform, transferring material from the printer onto the platform. Depending on how big you want your object, it can take hours or even days to complete. One of the ways 3D printing has changed the game is with prototypes. While injection molding used to be the standard, 3D printing has given it a run for its money. Each option — 3D printing and injection molding — has their strengths, but it can be beneficial to use both. To utilize the advantages of each method, there is a technique that can combine the two — leading to the speed and savings of 3D printing with the accuracy of injection molding. What Could Go Wrong? As more people start using this technology, the more security they’re going to need to monitor 3D printers. A team of researchers at NYU discovered that building something from a CAD file could then lead to issues with the product’s design. The printers could be hacked if they’re connected to the Internet while things are being printed. The most vulnerable issues are the printer’s orientation and the ability of hackers to insert fine defects into the body of an object being printed. The CAD files don’t specifically give instructions for orientation of the printer head. It’s possible, therefore, they could be changed without any detection. The defects would be inserted in between the printed layers of a product, and they wouldn’t be detected by the standard industry techniques that are currently used. Both of these could lead to some serious weaknesses in the printed objects — and they could be devastating. For instance, the aircraft industry has been using 3D printing for replacement parts, and a weakness in one of them could put everyone in the plane at risk. Auto manufacturers have been looking into the technology as well. What Can Be Done to Keep 3D Printing Safe? This problem showcases a need for new cybersecurity tools within the 3D printing industry. It also means that the methods of testing for defects and potential weaknesses in 3D printed products will need to be changed so they’re able to detect these kinds of issues. 3D printers could also use some sort of warning system when it appears an attack is happening. If you’re a manufacturer, avoid outsourcing your commercial printing to third parties if possible. They’re less trustworthy and could lead to potential sabotage of the product — as well as lawsuits and recalls. Internet-connected 3D printers go beyond this. Whenever you’re printing something, disconnect your printer from the Internet so hackers can’t get to what you’re making. In addition, encrypt your design files so they can’t be tampered with. It could be possible for companies to encrypt their designs so only their designated 3D printer would be able to read them. Another printer attempting to use the design wouldn’t be able to produce anything similar to the product. Technology is a wonderful thing, but the dangers of cybersecurity can’t be ignored. Make sure your 3D printed products are safe from the prying minds of hackers and take all of the precautions possible. It’s always better to be safe than sorry. About the Author: megannicholsMegan Nichols is the editor of Schooled by Science. She enjoys writing about the latest innovations in technology and science.
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Four Days to Save the Open Internet in Europe: An Open Letter

Four Days to Save the Open Internet in Europe: An Open Letter | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The post below is an open letter to European citizens, lawmakers and regulators, from our founder and Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Professor Barbara van Sc
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Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance

Bulgaria now allows only open source software for governance | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Bulgarian Parliament has passed amendments to its Electronic Governance Act which require all software written for the government to be open source.
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Microsoft Edge and Netflix — testing new restrictions by locking out competing browsers? | Defective by Design

Microsoft Edge and Netflix — testing new restrictions by locking out competing browsers? | Defective by Design | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Microsoft Edge and Netflix — testing new restrictions by locking out competing browsers?

Submitted by Zak Rogoff on July 15, 2016 - 2:04pm

Microsoft made the news last week when it announced that its Edge Web browser could deliver a better Netflix streaming experience than the other three most popular browsers. On Windows 10, Edge is the only one that can play Netflix's video streams — which are encumbered with Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) — in 1080p high definition. A PCWorld article confirmed the claim, but no one writing online has been able to give a clear explanation for the discrepancy. Following the tone of Microsoft's announcement, most writers seem content to imply that Edge's "edge" in Netflix playback on Windows derives from technical superiority, and that intelligent Netflix users should switch to Edge.

But this explanation doesn't seem to hold water. Other than the particular category of browsers running on Windows 10 and playing Netflix, modern browsers are in general technically capable of playing DRM-encumbered 1080p streams. Amazon Prime, for example, already indicates that it allows all major browsers to access DRM-encumbered streams in 1080p on Windows and Apple OS X. Rather than Edge being technically superior, it seems more likely that it can stream Netflix at a higher resolution because Netflix used its DRM to give Microsoft exclusive cryptographic permission to do so, and locked out other browsers. This anti-competitive arrangement would help Microsoft Edge win more Microsoft Windows users away from Chrome and Firefox, which appears to be a major goal for the company.
DRM itself is the problem

Let's zoom out for a minute. Would the situation be remedied if Netflix told its DRM to allow 1080p streaming to Chrome and Firefox on Windows? No — the problem here is not that Netflix chose Microsoft unfairly, it's that Netflix is able to use DRM to limit interoperability at all. Even setting interoperability aside, it's a problem for any company to use DRM in any circumstance, because its direct effects on users are even worse than its effects on markets. Non-comprehensively, DRM has been known to: punch holes in users' privacy and security, lock out those that wish to use free software, make it difficult for people with disabilities to access media, and make media that customers have already paid for suddenly inaccessible at the whim of the company that controls the DRM.

The technology that Microsoft and Netflix appear to be using to deliberately limit interoperability is a particularly far-reaching and ambitious system of standardized, cooperating DRM systems, called Encrypted Media Extensions, or EME. EME is a project of software and media companies (including none other than Microsoft and Netflix) working within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The W3C is a membership-based organization which sets official technical standards for the Web, and recently DRM-promoting companies have been able to steer it towards DRM.
Pulling the plug on EME

Even though EME is already implemented by Netflix, Edge, and some other browsers and streaming sites, the W3C has yet to fully ratify it as the first official Web standard for DRM. It's currently classified as a Candidate Recommendation (full text). If we allow EME to be ratified, we're likely to see even more uptake of DRM by other sites and browsers, leading to more anticompetitive behavior and, worse, a step back in Web users' privacy and other rights. History shows us that ratifying EME would also energize long-simmering campaigns by the DRM lobby to more deeply embed their coercive technology in other standards, like those for the display of text and static images, and protocols used by display cables and lower-level Internet infrastructure.

The W3C's rules of process mean that we can still prevent EME from being ratified — if we can demonstrate how many people oppose it. Stand with the dissenters in the W3C by signing our petition against EME or adding a protest selfie to the growing gallery. You can make an even stronger statement by respectfully requesting a meeting with one of the body's regional contacts and expressing your concerns in person.
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Payback? Russia gets hacked, revealing top Putin aide's secrets

Payback? Russia gets hacked, revealing top Putin aide's secrets | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

Emails from the Outlook accounts of Surkov's assistants Digital Forensic Research Lab at the Atlantic Council
A senior U.S. official, asked if the material was authentic, told NBC News that there was "nothing to indicate otherwise."

Hidden in the one gigabyte file are a variety of materials that provided evidence of Russian involvement at the highest levels in the war in eastern Ukraine, which has taken the lives of 10,000 people, including the 298 passengers and crew of Malaysian Flight 17, shot down by a separatist missile in July 2014 over Ukraine.

There is a list of casualties in the Donbass region of Ukraine sent from a high-ranking separatist official, and a list of candidates for office in a sham election. One email notes that the individuals with asterisks next to their name were "checked by us" and are "especially recommended." Days later, those same names were announced as having been "elected."

There are expense reports and a proposal for a government press office in Donetsk, scene of some of the fiercest fighting -- a three-person operation for separatist propaganda, with an editor, reporter and webmaster.

One U.S. official told NBC News that the material confirms much of what the U.S. believed was going on at the time, that the Kremlin was running the separatists at a micro-level. In fact, the official noted that Surkov's name was the first on a list of Russians and Ukrainians placed under executive sanctions by President Obama in March 2014, citing his role in the separatist movement. The action froze his U.S. assets in the United States and banned him from entering the country. Similar sanctions were imposed by the European Union.
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Crowdsource This | OpenMedia

Crowdsource This | OpenMedia | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Crowdsourcing is an integral part of our organization as we believe that strong participatory processes can pave the way for a better future, in which the values of the majority are reflected in major decision making and outcomes. So here's a window into our core principles!

Followers of OpenMedia will know that we try our best to develop our positions and campaigns by crowdsourcing input from our community -- sometimes hundreds of thousands of Internet users. We believe that by modeling participatory processes and empowering the voices of everyday Internet users, we can show the way toward a more connected future for us all.

Here are some examples of our crowdsourced action plans for online Access, Free Expression, and Privacy, and our Internet Voice Tools on EU copyright policy and U.S. net neutrality. We even crowdsource what we should say during meetings with government ministers!

Our processes and methods of crowdsourcing are based on our belief that the best ideas come those most impacted by our work, and that the challenges we face are really the result of a democratic deficit in governing institutions. In short, we believe that if citizens rather than lobbyists are in the driver's seat of government decisions we’ll have better outcomes to the most pressing issues of our time including digital rights.

I recently noticed that we’re increasingly asked about our crowdsourcing methods by those working at other organizations and those in government who recognize the need for change. This interest in participatory processes is really exciting and we want to honour it by sharing OpenMedia’s principles for crowdsourcing below. We hope the world will begin to operate more like the web with open, participatory, and collaborative values — and we can’t make that happen on our own.

I welcome input on the principles below in the comments section, email, Facebook, or Twitter.
What is Crowdsourcing?

OpenMedia is a civic engagement platform for the Internet community. For us, civic engagement means crowdsourcing our internal and public-facing work based on our operating principles, the ‘advice process’ of Teal organizations and principles for effective crowdsourced engagement listed below.

Crowdsourcing, as defined by Jeff Howe, who coined the term, is "the act of taking a job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people in the form of an open call." Mozilla’s David Asher likens a new role for organizations to that of a book editor who guides a project and provides useful feedback and input to the producer -- more of a facilitator.
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Judge Mayer provides a strong case against software patents in Intellectual Ventures v. Symantec — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software

Judge Mayer provides a strong case against software patents in Intellectual Ventures v. Symantec — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
There, we explained the dangers of software patents and argued that "not only do software idea patents fail established tests for patentability; they also violate the First Amendment." It appears that someone on the Federal Circuit (the court that hears appeals on cases involving patents in the U.S.) took note.

That someone is Judge Haldane Robert Mayer, who in a stunning concurrence in Intellectual Ventures v. Symantec (links to a PDF) outlined the case against software patents. The argument will be familiar to those who have read the FSF's Amicus in Alice: software patents fail basic tests for patentability and violate the First Amendment. And while the fact that it is only a concurrence (and not the main opinion of the court) means that it is not settled law, it is a huge step forward in protecting computer users from the dangers of software patents.

Mayer lays out the First Amendment argument against patentability of certain subjects, noting that limits on the subject matter of patents are meant to protect free expression. Under U.S. law, 35 U.S.C § 101 (section 101) lays out the scope of patentable subject matter. In analysing this section, courts have carved out certain subjects as being outside the scope of patentability so as to protect freedom of expression. In particular, abstract ideas and mental process have been found too threatening to the free exchange of ideas to permit them to be locked up in patents. After outlining the basics, Mayer goes on to state that "Most of the First Amendment concerns associated with patent protection could be avoided if this court were willing to acknowledge that Alice sounded the death knell for software patents."
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Researchers think chaos theory can get us past Moore's Law

Researchers think chaos theory can get us past Moore's Law | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, believed that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit would double every year or two. And, to his credit, that rule pretty much held out between 1965 and 2015, when the laws of physics began to get in the way. Now, researchers at North Carolina State believe that we don't need to obsess over ever-smaller transistors to make chips even more powerful. Instead, they've turned to chaos theory in the hope that mixing things up will provide the performance boost that Intel can't.

Lead researcher Behnam Kia explains that we are now "reaching the limits of physics in terms of transistor size." If you've ever listened to one of Intel's presentations, you'll notice that every new production process is getting harder to achieve. It's not that easy to crank out perfect 14-nanometer chips, and the company has delayed its 10-nanometer chips several times as a consequence. But Kia and the team believe that our obsession with size has obscured a key fact about how chips are currently built.

In the average PC chip, there are a series of circuits that use transistors, and each one is designed to perform a specific function. Imagine a factory where each circuit is an employee holding a calculator, and their job each day is to do a single equation over and over. The first chips had a handful of employees, but over time walls were knocked down, calculators were shrunk and employees lost weight. That means more folks are crammed into the same building, but each one is still just doing one bit of math when required.

That means that plenty of transistors are being left dormant, a quantity of wasted capacity in the system that we could harness. As Kia explains, the new chip design uses "chaos theory -- the system's own nonlinearity -- to enable transistor circuits to be programmed to perform different tasks." In our labored metaphor, your factory would stop employing more people, and instead train those already there to do multiple calculations. That way, you could do more work/math with the same number of transistors/employees, and apparently it's not that hard to implement.

The team at NC State believe that while their idea is currently theoretical, creating a programmable transistor circuit isn't difficult. The team thinks that these reconfigurable chips could be produced with almost the exact same tools as Intel currently uses on the production lines. If so, then it could offer up a way for CPU power to increase while we wait for the materials scientists to work out exactly how to produce workable chips below 5-nanometers.

Source: NC State, IEEE
In this article: BehnamKia, ChaosTheory, Chips, gear, Intel, MooresLaw, NCState, personal computing, personalcomputing, science, TL16MRSLW, Transistor
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Basisinkomen 2018- Een basisinkomen voor iedere volwassene. Teken de petitie.

Beste 2e kamerleden,

Wij zien in een onvoorwaardelijk basisinkomen veel voordelen.

Het verschaft iedereen een minimale bestaanszekerheid
Mensen hebben de vrijheid om zelf keuzes te maken tussen betaald werk, opleiding, onderneming, vrijwilligerswerk en/of (mantel)zorg.
Het rondpompen van geld, de bijbehorende bureaucratie en controles kunnen afgeschaft worden.
Mensen worden bevrijd van de beperkende ‘etiketten’ die nu geplakt worden.
Het loont als mensen met elkaar samenwerken, kosten delen en/of samenwonen.
Gelijktijdige hervorming van de arbeidsmarkt zorgt voor meer betaald werk en meer (deeltijd)banen.

We laten zien dat het basisinkomen nu al betaalbaar is als we de beschikbare middelen anders verdelen. Naast een basisinkomen krijgen mensen ook een gratis basiszorgverzekering en een toelage per kind onder de 18 jaar.

Daarom zijn wij een groot voorstander van invoering van het basisinkomen met ingang van 2018.
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Nag Hammadi Library

Nag Hammadi Library | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
The Nag Hammadi Library (Nag Hammadi Scriptures and the Gnostic Gospels). The site includes the Gnostic Society Library with the complete Nag Hammadi Library and Scriptures - the Gnostic Gospels - and a large collection of other primary Gnostic scriptures and documents. A vast collection of materials and audio lectures dealing with Gnosis and Gnosticism, both ancient and modern.
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Firm: Facebook's shadow profiles are 'frightening' dossiers on everyone | ZDNet

Firm: Facebook's shadow profiles are 'frightening' dossiers on everyone | ZDNet | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

Facebook's shadow profile data collection activities came to light Friday when the social network disclosed a bug fix.

The security researchers who found the vulnerability, Packet Storm Security, say Facebook is compiling "frightening" dossiers on everyone possible, including people without Facebook accounts.
facebook shadow profile

Last week, Packet Storm discovered Facebook's vulnerability and contacted Facebook.

After extended dialogue with Facebook the researchers were compelled to reflect that, "The issue itself was not built with malice in mind it was simply an oversight. The significance of what it unearthed is the real problem that still remains."

Since 2012, Facebook had unintentionally combined user's shadow profiles with their Facebook profiles and shared it with those users' friends who used Facebook's Download Your Information (DYI) tool.

If only Facebook had explained the bug as clearly as Packet Storm in its post Facebook: Where Your Friends Are Your Worst Enemies:

When you open the downloaded archive, there is a file inside called addressbook.html. This file is supposed to house the contact information you uploaded.

However, due to a flaw in how Facebook implemented this, it also housed contact information from other uploads other users have performed for the same person, provided you had one piece of matching data, effectively building large dossiers on people.

In our testing, we found that uploading one public email address for an individual could reap a dozen additional pieces of contact information.

It should also be noted that the collection of this information goes for all of the data uploaded, regardless of whether or not your contacts are Facebook users.

Most people who found out they have a 'shadow profile' with contact info they never gave to Facebook - such as telephone numbers - were surprised and angry.

Facebook responded Sunday pointing to a page on its address book email collection policy and emphasizing that the data is uploaded voluntarily by people the users know.

Updated with Facebook's response: Anger mounts after Facebook's 'shadow profiles' leak in bug

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The real alarm rose when Packet Storm began to comprehend what this meant for the individual user - and what happened when the security researchers approached Facebook with its concrete fears:

The fact that I have no control over additional email addresses and phone numbers added to their data store on me is frightening. The questions we asked were very to the point but carefully constructed to reflect an equal balance between usability and user safety.

(...) Our first question asked that, in the name of common decency and privacy, would Facebook ever commit to automatically discarding information of individuals that do not have a known Facebook account? Possibly age it out X days if they don't respond to an invite due to a friend uploading their information without their knowledge?

Their response was essentially that they think of contacts imported by a user as the user's data and they are allowed to do with it what they want.

To clarify, it's not your data, it's your friends. We went on to ask them if Facebook would commit to having a privacy setting that dictates Facebook will automatically delete any and all data uploaded about me via third parties ("friends") if it's not in scope with what I've shared on my profile (and by proxy, is out of band from my privacy settings)?

We were basically met with the same reasoning as above and in their wording they actually went as far as claiming that it would be a freedom of speech violation.

Standing on its policy, Facebook is refusing to allow users to have control over their own personal information.

Facebook policy in this area is that your data is not yours; it belongs to your friends, and by its rules your friends - or merely peple you know - have more control over your data than you do.

Packet Storm praised Facebook for acting swiftly to patch the bug.

The security company emphasized that it is not Facebook security that is broken, but instead it is Facebook policy that is broken, and their disclosure is not meant to cast a negative light on the company.

Packet Storm remarked, "It was clear that Facebook attacked the disclosure flaw properly, but concerns still remain about the fact that dossiers are being built on everyone possible."

"You can run, but you can't hide"

Right now commenters across the Internet will be saying, Don't join Facebook or Delete your account. But it appears that we're subject to Facebook's shadow profiles whether or not we choose to participate.

I feel like we're only beginning to understand why Facebook's data is so very valuable to advertisers, governments, app makers and malicious entities.

Packet Storm wrote,

It is now publicly known that Facebook has all of this correlated information (or if it's not now, it can be) and everyone (read: governments and criminals alike) are going to aim for it, whether legally or illegally.

Facebook claims they will not disclose this additional information to the government when requests are received, but it still has the world's largest target painted on it asking for trouble.

Packet Storm thinks legislation is the answer. "What we need are governments to enact legislation that forces the hand, but given recent news items in the United States, it is clear that not all governments are making this a top priority."

We are well aware right now that our laws are woefully inept when it comes to keeping up with data privacy.

Some of us hope that this is an oversight that will be corrected.

There are no protections against shadow profiling. Just like with so-called "people search" websites, we have no legal mandates with which we can identify and remove our information from their systems, no protections that guarantee an opt-out, and no recourse other than to say "no."

Let's hope that Facebook policy listens to the anger and fear they're inspiring right now, and that it means something.

Because if there was ever a time Facebook needs to do the right thing, it's now

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Snapshot Serengeti

Snapshot Serengeti | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
About Classify Profile Discuss Blog Authors August 25 2016 10:08 AM Fire No animals present Search Aardvark Genet Porcupine Aardwolf Giraffe Reedbuck Baboon Guinea fowl Reptiles Bat Hare Rhinoceros Bat-eared fox Hartebeest Rodents Bird (other) Hippopotamus Secretary bird Buffalo Honey-badger Serval Bushbuck Hyena (spotted) Steenbok Cattle Hyena (striped) Topi Caracal Impala Vervet monkey Cheetah Insect/Spider Vulture Civet Jackal Warthog Dik dik Kori bustard Waterbuck Duiker Leopard Wildcat Eland Lion (female or cub) Wildebeest Elephant Lion (male) Zebra Gazelle (Grant's) Mongoose Zorilla Gazelle (Thomson's) Ostrich Human
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Where in the world is my data and how secure is it? - BBC News

Where in the world is my data and how secure is it? - BBC News | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it

When Max Schrems, an Austrian privacy activist, requested to see his personal data that Facebook stored on its servers, he was mailed a CD-ROM containing a 1,222-page document.
That file, which would stretch nearly a quarter of a mile if printed and laid end-to-end, offered a glimpse into Facebook's appetite for the private details of its 1.65 billion users.
The information included phone numbers and email addresses of Mr Schrems' friends and family; a history of all the devices he used to log in to the service; all the events he had been invited to; everyone he had "friended" (and subsequently de-friended); and an archive of his private messages.
It even included transcripts of messages he'd deleted.
But Mr Schrems, who says he only used Facebook occasionally over a three-year period, believes a sizeable chunk of information was withheld from him.

The more of our data that's out there scattered throughout the world, the more vulnerable it is to hackers, argues Mr Caudill - a supposition borne out by the fact that identity fraud is on the rise. As people continue to upload their digital information online, into a marsh of territorial legal complexities and undisclosed national security protocols, Prof Svantesson offers some practical advice - which many people still do not follow. "I would suggest never putting anything sensitive on the cloud, such as credit card information, or personal images that you don't want others to see. "Some things you should just leave to yourself," he advises.

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11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World

11 Police Robots Patrolling Around the World | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
More than a thousand robotics experts, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, signed a letter last summer warning against machines that can select targets without human control. We wanted to find out just how many of these things are in use around the world. But law enforcement isn’t exactly forthcoming about the topic, so this list is not exhaustive. Here’s what we found.
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Obama Says Experts Tie Russia to DNC Hacking

Obama Says Experts Tie Russia to DNC Hacking | Semantic Gnosis Web | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON—President Barack Obama for the first time tied Russia to a recent computer breach that penetrated the Democratic National Committee’s network, saying “experts” believe hackers from that country carried out the operation.

“I know that experts have attributed this to the Russians,” Mr. Obama said in an interview with NBC’s “Today Show” scheduled to air Wednesday morning. “What we do know is that the Russians hack our systems. Not just government systems, but private systems.”

He stopped short of alleging that Russian President Vladimir Putin was working to help Republican nominee Donald Trump win the White House by leaking thousands of emails stolen as part of the DNC files. Instead, he said the Federal Bureau of Investigation was still investigating the matter and suggested Russia would stand to benefit from a Trump victory.

“What the motives were in terms of the leaks, all that, I can’t say directly,” Mr. Obama said. “What I do know is that Donald Trump has repeatedly expressed admiration for Vladimir Putin.”
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