Self-sufficiency on the smallholding
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Homestead Survivalist: Growing Potatoes In Containers

Homestead Survivalist: Growing Potatoes In Containers | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

Potatoes can easily be cultivated in containers simply as easy as in a classic technique of growing plants. half

barrels, Terracotta pots, trash cans and also a burlap sack,or trash bags are all excellent options of containers to raise your potatoes in.

The one factor that you require to keep in mind when developing potatoes in a container, is that the vase of your option could not really be to deep, 12 - 18 inches is a great depth. The cause for this depth is that sun energy is essential for vegetable progress, plus even though potato plants could expand to a level in the place of 2 - 3 feet, they require to be hilled or protected as they grow.

Growing your plants in a bag enables you to pull the sides up as the vegetable grows, in a container or other sort of pot you will always have to hill the plant as it gets taller. That can easily done just by placing a 2 foot tall wire mess close to the inside of the pot as the plat develops and covering the plant with hay, potting media, or compost. When you have you have the pot of your option, make sure there are enough drainage gaps in the bottom or the lower sides.

At this point is it the moment to get ready your potatoes for seeding. These potatoes may be seed potatoes from a garden company, or potatoes that you possess on hand that are beginning to develop. Cut the potatoes so that there are three eyes on each piece, two eyes is good if the numbers is not going to work out. I have even grown all of them with one, and they did just good. As soon as the cutting is finished, you will require them to stay for around a day to create a dry covering around the cut area.

When you are looking for the potatoes to dry, you might begin filling your pot using potting media combined with an healthy fertilizer, and pre soak the media so that it is moist. Once ready, put the potatoes that you have cut in the pot with the eyes facing up. In the regular container,with a size around twenty inches, I put three items spaced apart evenly, protect them with about 2 - 3 inches of media, plus water until the media is moist. To avoid wasting time, you could pre soak the media before you plant, and get it available for covering the potatoes at planting time.


Via Giri Kumar
Peter Scogings's insight:

must try this some time.

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Organic Garden Pest Control - Say Bye To Pests (Without Toxins)

Organic Garden Pest Control - Say Bye To Pests (Without Toxins) | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

As I’ve discussed in other posts, the best organic garden pest control method is a healthy ecosystem.

This means creating the right conditions for thriving, healthy plants by doing things like caring for the soil, watering properly, and having the right plant in the right place.

Then our plants won’t attract diseases or plant-feeding insects.

But it’s a tricky balancing act to keep garden ecosystems in perfect balance while shaping them to meet our own needs.

Even the most meticulous organic gardeners don’t manage to keep all their plants perfectly healthy all the time.

Sooner or later, we all end up running into the occasional plant predator – insects and diseases that want to make lunch out of our precious flowers or organic vegetable garden before we get a chance to enjoy them.

Fortunately, there are a few things we can do to avoid this.

There are also some options for how to deal with plant predators when diplomacy fails and we’re faced with a choice between fighting back and losing our crop...

Preventive Organic Pest Control 

Organic gardening pest control starts with prevention.

One way to keep predators away from your plants is by using intelligent planting practices.

This means being careful not to bring pests and diseases into the garden from nurseries or on your tools or clothes.

Only choose pest-free plants, and disinfect your tools.

You can also use particularly smelly plants to mislead and confuse plant predators. These odorous plants bear the majestic title of “aromatic pest confusers.”

Many herbs fit into this category, as well as alliums like garlic and onions, and even some flowering plants such as marigolds.

By interspersing them throughout your organic garden, or deliberately planting them around other plants that you know are vulnerable to insect attack, you can do a lot to keep the would-be predators chasing their own tails instead of munching your lettuce.

You can also discourage diseases simply by rotating your crops. Use different plants, and if possible different families of plants, in each bed each year.

It’s harder for soil-based diseases such as clubroot in brassicas, or insects like wireworms whose larval phase lives in the soil, to get established if their favorite food source keeps moving around.

 

Read more at:

 

http://www.smilinggardener.com/organic-pest-control/organic-garden-pest-control?awt_l=DXgtA&awt_m=3jziwZMOkv2DE1m&utm_source=aweber&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20130504&utm_campaign=broadcast

 

 

 


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How to Start Saving Seeds

How to Start Saving Seeds | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

http://modernfarmer.com/2013/04/how-to-start-saving-seeds/

 


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The Backyard Farming Connection: Homestead Highlight: Rob

The Backyard Farming Connection: Homestead Highlight: Rob | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

Inspirational stuff here....

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Open Source Ecology: Building Sustainable Communities – Digital ...

Open Source Ecology: Building Sustainable Communities – Digital ... | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it
Launched just two years ago, Open Source Ecology is a not-for-profit association of farmers, engineers and supporters that have created open source, low-cost and high-performance technological platforms that allow ...
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Stockpiling the Cow Pantry

Stockpiling the Cow Pantry | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

More stories for the grassland scientists...

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Organic Farming and Companion Planting: How Does it Work?

Organic Farming and Companion Planting: How Does it Work? | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

Gardeners are aware that an effective organic gardening will become feasible if there is a diverse mix of plants and food crops.  Moreover, some people believe that combining plant species may have extraordinary skills in helping each species to grow and propagate. Several studies claim that some plant species combination provides synergistic effects in their growth, and it has already been placed to practice by various gardeners today.

 

How it works?

Companion planting works in various ways. Some of its benefits include the following: companion planting helps each plant species grow, prevent pest problems, use garden space efficiently, and attract beneficial insects.

 

Examples of Winning Plant Species Combinations

Cabbage and tomatoes. Tomatoes can help maintain sustainable growth of the cabbages as it serves as a repellant to remove moth larvae.Corn and beans. Beans supplement the growth of the corns as it attracts favorable insects that prey on corn pests such as leaf beetles, leafhoppers and fall army worms.Cucumbers and nasturtiums. The Vining stems of the nasturtiums can be a great help among growing cucumbers, as they are capable of repelling cucumber beetles and spiders.Spinach and radishes. The growth of spinach will be enhanced when there are radishes planted around them. Radishes can lure the leaf miners away from the spinach. What’s quite interesting about this combination is that despite the damage of the radish leaves done by the pests, it doesn’t hamper the healthy growth of the radishes.Roses and chives. For gardeners who have been propagating roses, planting garlic near them is essential, as garlic is known to repel rose pests.Potatoes and sweet Alyssum. Sweet asylum propagates tiny flowers that serve to attract delicate advantageous insects like predatory wasps. Planting it along potatoes and broccoli ensures pest-free crops. Also, the sweet fragrance of Alyssumm provides a great scent in the garden.Collards and catnip. Researches reveal that planting catnip near the collards can help reduce the pestering of collards caused by flea beetles.Lettuce and tall flowers. Tall flowers like Nicotiana and Cleome can provide a great shade on the lettuce to have it grow at its best.

 

Indeed, companion planting can be an essential method in getting a higher yield of plant crops while maintaining the sustainability and biodiversity of the environment. Gardeners can apply some of the plant combinations in their organic gardens.


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Homestead Survivalist: Growing Potatoes In Containers

Homestead Survivalist: Growing Potatoes In Containers | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

Potatoes can easily be cultivated in containers simply as easy as in a classic technique of growing plants. half

barrels, Terracotta pots, trash cans and also a burlap sack,or trash bags are all excellent options of containers to raise your potatoes in.

The one factor that you require to keep in mind when developing potatoes in a container, is that the vase of your option could not really be to deep, 12 - 18 inches is a great depth. The cause for this depth is that sun energy is essential for vegetable progress, plus even though potato plants could expand to a level in the place of 2 - 3 feet, they require to be hilled or protected as they grow.

Growing your plants in a bag enables you to pull the sides up as the vegetable grows, in a container or other sort of pot you will always have to hill the plant as it gets taller. That can easily done just by placing a 2 foot tall wire mess close to the inside of the pot as the plat develops and covering the plant with hay, potting media, or compost. When you have you have the pot of your option, make sure there are enough drainage gaps in the bottom or the lower sides.

At this point is it the moment to get ready your potatoes for seeding. These potatoes may be seed potatoes from a garden company, or potatoes that you possess on hand that are beginning to develop. Cut the potatoes so that there are three eyes on each piece, two eyes is good if the numbers is not going to work out. I have even grown all of them with one, and they did just good. As soon as the cutting is finished, you will require them to stay for around a day to create a dry covering around the cut area.

When you are looking for the potatoes to dry, you might begin filling your pot using potting media combined with an healthy fertilizer, and pre soak the media so that it is moist. Once ready, put the potatoes that you have cut in the pot with the eyes facing up. In the regular container,with a size around twenty inches, I put three items spaced apart evenly, protect them with about 2 - 3 inches of media, plus water until the media is moist. To avoid wasting time, you could pre soak the media before you plant, and get it available for covering the potatoes at planting time.


Via Giri Kumar
Peter Scogings's insight:

must try this some time.

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Drive On Wood! | Woodgas Power.

Drive On Wood! | Woodgas Power. | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it
Welcome to Wayne Keith's woodgas site! There's a lot to learn from other woodgas enthusiasts. Join the conversation! Have you built a wood gasifier? Let us know!
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The Straw Bale Dilemma: How Smooth Is Smooth?

The Straw Bale Dilemma: How Smooth Is Smooth? | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

How to build a straw house!!!

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Milk and Manure

Milk and Manure | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

Inspirational integration of livestock and crops on the smallholding...

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Grazing Through the Drought in Western Oregon

Grazing Through the Drought in Western Oregon | Self-sufficiency on the smallholding | Scoop.it

One for the grassland scientists out there.

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