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Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems
Exploring the self-organizing dynamics of interactive entities
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Using Chaos Theory to Predict and Prevent Catastrophic 'Dragon King' Events - Wired

Using Chaos Theory to Predict and Prevent Catastrophic 'Dragon King' Events - Wired | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
Using Chaos Theory to Predict and Prevent Catastrophic 'Dragon King' Events Wired By looking at a simple experimental chaotic system, Gauthier and his co-authors have been able to detect telltale signs that a dragon king event was approaching and,...
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PyCX 0.3 Now Available

PyCX 0.3 Now Available | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
The PyCX Project aims to develop an online repository of simple, crude, yet easy-to-understand Python sample codes for dynamic complex systems simulations, including iterative maps, cellular automata, dynamical networks and agent-based models.

Via Hiroki Sayama, Complexity Digest
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'Dynamo' accounts for Sun's weather cycle - Futurity: Research News

'Dynamo' accounts for Sun's weather cycle - Futurity: Research News | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
'Dynamo' accounts for Sun's weather cycle Futurity: Research News The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the National Science Foundation-sponsored Center for Magnetic Self-Organization at the University of Chicago partially funded...
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“Previously, dynamos for large, highly conducting bodies such as the Sun would be overwhelmed by small-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field. Here, we have demonstrated a new mechanism involving a shear flow, which served to damp these small-scale variations, revealing the dominant large-scale pattern”, says co-author Steve Tobias, professor at the University of Leeds’ School of Mathematics."

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Bateson Symposium - 2013 in Charlottesville and the University of Virginia

Bateson Symposium - 2013 in Charlottesville and the University of Virginia | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
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Paradigm shift and the (non) future of schools

Paradigm shift and the (non) future of schools | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
I want to share some of my Sunday reading and listening with you. First a blog post by Dave Algoso on his blog "Find What Works": in the article Kuhn, Chambers and the future of international devel...
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Regularity and Complexity in Dynamical Systems (by Albert C. J. Luo)

Regularity and Complexity in Dynamical Systems describes periodic and chaotic behaviors in dynamical systems, including continuous, discrete, impulsive,discontinuous, and switching systems. In traditional analysis, the periodic and chaotic behaviors in continuous, nonlinear dynamical systems were extensively discussed even if unsolved. In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of interest in periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems because such dynamical systems are prevalent in engineering. Usually,the smoothening of discontinuous dynamical system is adopted in order to use the theory of continuous dynamical systems. However, such technique cannot provide suitable results in such discontinuous systems. In this book, an alternative way is presented to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

 

 


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L’origine dei Big Data - Fabbrica Futuro

L’origine dei Big Data - Fabbrica Futuro | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
Complexity Institute's insight:

Interessante articolo su eventuali applicazioni al management come processo bottom-up della conoscenza

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What is systems thinking? Part II

What is systems thinking? Part II | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, December 27, 2012 11:53 AM

If we are systems thinkers, we don’t lose the ability (or valuing of) analytical thinking; we are, however, extending ourselves in our abilities to apply both when applicable.  There may be something of a butterfly’s “essential being” that existed when it was a caterpillar, but I think we’d all agree that “caterpillar” and “butterfly” are two entirely different things.  ”Butterfly” is not merely “Caterpillar 2.0″; it is “butterfly”, incorporating some elements of, and transcending “caterpillar”, if you like.

 

It’s about working with things as integral wholes.  It’s about thinking bigger.  Water is inherently wet.  We cannot understand water’s wetness by breaking it down into its component parts; oxygen and hydrogen.  Neither of those elements has an inherent quality of “wetness”.  Similarly, with businesses, we cannot get a truly comprehensive understanding of them simply by breaking them down into their component parts.  Everything is connected to everything else and we are limited in our abilities to manage them effectively if we isolate “problem parts”.  Making a holistic assessment of the system will give us a bigger picture view that highlights strengths, inter-relationships, tensions, the forces at work (both from within and without the system) and areas of hope (where intervention can be applied).

 
Sue Hickton's curator insight, April 14, 2014 3:51 AM

"If we are systems thinkers, we don’t lose the ability (or valuing of) analytical thinking; we are, however, extending ourselves in our abilities to apply both when applicable."

 

"Systems thinking is a fundamental change to business orthodoxy.  The assumptions we hold about the business of business mostly orient us to measure things that don’t matter and attack problems that are only really indicators of a systemic pattern.  We try to find answers for questions that are often irrelevant.  Time to think bigger"

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Identification boosts conflicts

Identification boosts conflicts | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

Identification boosts conflicts. A managerial paradox

 

A critical and complex perspective in managing business organizations’ identities dynamics

Dario Simoncini, Marinella De Simone NUOVA ATLANTIDE...

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Perspectives on a Hyperconnected World: Insights from the Science of Complexity

by the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Complex Systems

 

Every day our world becomes more complex and dynamic. The global population continues to rise with urbanization occurring at an exponential rate. Economic growth brings people from diverse cultures and regions into contact with one another through increased trade and travel. The Internet and social media now seem to connect each person to everyone else, and to make information available to all.


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Ellie Kesselman Wells's comment, January 27, 2013 1:43 PM
They were quite wise not to explicitly mention Davos. This is what should be discussed at Davos, not celebrity photos! Thank you for sharing with us, Dr. Nooo!
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System Dynamics #2 – A Simple US Economic Model ...

System Dynamics #2 – A Simple US Economic Model ... | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

We have discussed many concepts in regard to how the monetary system really works. I finally hit the brain overload point and decided that I needed to draw a diagram and capture some of the basic concepts.


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Emergent Sensing of Complex Environments by Mobile Animal Groups

Emergent Sensing of Complex Environments by Mobile Animal Groups | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

Science 1 February 2013: 
Vol. 339 no. 6119 pp. 574-576 
DOI: 10.1126/science.1225883

 

ABSTRACT

The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of personal estimates. Here, we reveal that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients. Robust collective sensing arises at the group level from individuals modulating their speed in response to local, scalar, measurements of light and through social interaction with others. This distributed sensing requires only rudimentary cognition and thus could be widespread across biological taxa, in addition to being appropriate and cost-effective for robotic agents.

 


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Shady El Damaty's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:22 AM

Fascinating paper published in February's edition of Science. We often consider intelligence as an emergent phenomena at the scale of individual organisms.  Yet, complex social systems and structures may also exhibit behavior reflecting the predispositions of its members as a whole.  Perhaps we can view the dynamics of societies from this scaled perspective to better understand the issues facing our modern society.

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Systems Thinking as a Spiritual Practice

Systems Thinking as a Spiritual Practice | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

David Peter Stroh hits the nail on the head with his recent post on the relationship between systems thinking and spiritual practice on the Leverage Points Blog.  Our ways of seeing and ways of being are profoundly affected by our interior condition.  Many aspects of systems thinking are deeply aligned with the wisdom of many spiritual traditions.


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Philippe Vallat's curator insight, January 23, 2013 2:56 AM

Very interesting and inspiring paper!

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Manage Complexity by Visual Data Exploration - Bio-IT World

Manage Complexity by Visual Data Exploration - Bio-IT World | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
Manage Complexity by Visual Data Exploration
Bio-IT World
Datasets in current life science research often have many more variables (tens of thousands and more) than samples (hundreds).
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The Surprising Origins of Life’s Complexity

The Surprising Origins of Life’s Complexity | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

Conventional wisdom holds that complex structures evolve from simpler ones, step-by-step, through a gradual evolutionary process, with Darwinian selection favoring intermediate forms along the way.
But recently some scholars have proposed that complexity can arise by other means—as a side effect, for instance—even without natural selection to promote it.
Studies suggest that random mutations that individually have no effect on an organism can fuel the emergence of complexity in a process known as constructive neutral evolution.

 

https://www.simonsfoundation.org/quanta/20130716-the-surprising-origins-of-lifes-complexity/


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Corallo o tulipano? Le mille forme dei microcristalli - Le Scienze

Corallo o tulipano? Le mille forme dei microcristalli - Le Scienze | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
VAI ALL'ARTICOLO: Come progettare microarchitetture complesse Il metodo messo a punto da Wim L.
Complexity Institute's insight:

La bellezza è il modo in cui noi possiamo riconoscere la complessità

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Shifting the paradigm: Kuhn, Chambers and the future of international development

Shifting the paradigm: Kuhn, Chambers and the future of international development | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
In 1962, Thomas Kuhn introduced a remarkable idea with a book called The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. He argued against the simple narrative that scientific progresses occurs through the gr...
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19th Century French Artists Predicted The World Of The Future In This Series Of Postcards

19th Century French Artists Predicted The World Of The Future In This Series Of Postcards | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
If you’ve ever struggled to imagine how life will change over the next century thanks to technology, take comfort — you’re not alone. Over 100 year ago, some French artists tried to do the same thing.

Via Harold Thwaites, Eugene Ch'ng
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Harold Thwaites's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:01 AM

Some true imagination at work in the 19th Century. With of course a lot of help from Jules Verne. Great images!

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Whose Paradigm Counts? Guest Post 1 of 2 By Robert Chambers

Whose Paradigm Counts? Guest Post 1 of 2 By Robert Chambers | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
Last year I wrote a paper called Paradigms, Poverty and Adaptive Pluralism. In it I explored how technological advances and complexity sciences were together helping to reframe a longstanding divid...
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What is systems thinking - part III

What is systems thinking - part III | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

John Wenger


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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, January 4, 2013 5:13 AM

In both of these cases, systems thinking forces us to look at the whole, not the individual parts.  It is the job of the modern manager to re-vision their function from one of “controller” to one of “steward”.  The focus is on purpose, values and meaning.  What does this business exist to achieve or create in the world?  What values will guide us in doing this?  How is this meaningful for the people who work here?  It is the role of managers to ensure that the correct conditions exist for these things to be realised, not to tell people what to do.

Sue Hickton's curator insight, April 14, 2014 3:57 AM

"We must stop ourselves from repeating old mistakes and develop our abilities to think bigger so that we can go further.  Hand in hand with this, we need also to develop greater ease with the complexity we will see before us and greater confidence to deal with being a little less certain about things.  The effects of the system are there, whether we decide to look or not. "

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What is systems thinking? (Part I)

What is systems thinking? (Part I) | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:55 AM

Analytical thinking is hitting the laws of physics and has been found wanting.  The analytical mindset is at the foundation of our educational systems, our political systems, our financial systems and the business of business, all of which are reaching the end of their effectiveness in a world characterised by increasing complexity, volatility, uncertainty and ambiguity.  This is being felt by many, but the awareness of what underlies it is lagging behind, so in an effort to ameliorate chronically low employee engagement, increasingly low voter turnout at elections, poor customer loyalty, or low attainment at school, we deploy little tricks or try to invent new “tools” or “techniques”.  However, all the tools and techniques in the world are useless to really address these issues if they come out of the same old mechanistic, analytical mindset.  A more sophisticated mindset is required first.  A new kind of thinking, not a new trick devised out of old thinking, is required.

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Video Article: Embracing Complexity

Video Article: Embracing Complexity | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it

Your grade ten math teacher probably wrote this several times on your tests: SIMPLIFY. And, for much of science, that’s part of the work: SIMPLIFY. The universe can be broken down into smaller and smaller chunks in an attempt to find its most basic level and functions. But what do you do when that doesn’t work? Complex systems that defy reduction are all around us, from the elaborate workings of an ant colony—which could never be predicted from the physiology of a single ant—to fluctuations in the financial system that can send ripples around the globe. When broken into their constituent pieces, examined and put back together, such systems do not behave as expected. The sum of the parts does not equal the whole

 

Interview to Raissa D’Souza by Graeme Stemp Morlock

http://www.fqxi.org/community/articles/display/174

 


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starwalker's curator insight, January 28, 2013 4:17 AM

"I firmly believe networks become more interdependent in time," says D’Souza. "We see the global economy becoming more interdependent. We see Facebook making everyone more interconnected. We’re relying increasingly on technologies like the Internet and communications networks, for instance, the smart-grid, a cyber-physical system. All these networks that used to operate more independently are now becoming more interconnected, and to me that is really a signature of time."

Simon Gifford's curator insight, January 31, 2013 3:37 AM

Lengthy but interesting

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Increased Network Interdependency Leads to Aging

Although species longevity is subject to a diverse range of selective forces, the mortality curves of a wide variety of organisms are rather similar. We argue that aging and its universal characteristics may have evolved by means of a gradual increase in the systemic interdependence between a large collection of biochemical or mechanical components. Modeling the organism as a dependency network which we create using a constructive evolutionary process, we age it by allowing nodes to be broken or repaired according to a probabilistic algorithm that accounts for random failures/repairs and dependencies. Our simulations show that the network slowly accumulates damage and then catastrophically collapses. We use our simulations to fit experimental data for the time dependent mortality rates of a variety of multicellular organisms and even complex machines such as automobiles. Our study suggests that aging is an emergent finite-size effect in networks with dynamical dependencies and that the qualitative and quantitative features of aging are not sensitively dependent on the details of system structure.

 

Increased Network Interdependency Leads to Aging

Dervis Can Vural, Greg Morrison, L. Mahadevan

http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.6375


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CFP: Springer CASM Special Issue on Modeling Large-scale Communication Networks


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Collaboration is the New Competition

Collaboration is the New Competition | Complexity & Self-Organizing Systems | Scoop.it
Five ways to drive large-scale social change by working cooperatively.

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ddrrnt's curator insight, January 12, 2013 2:19 AM

Leaders and organizations are acknowledging that even their best individual efforts can't stack up against today's complex and interconnected problems. They are putting aside self-interests and collaborating to build a new civic infrastructure to advance their shared objectives. It's called collective impact and it's a growing trend across the country. (...)

While collaboration is certainly not a foreign concept, what we're seeing around the country is the coming together of non-traditional partners, and a willingness to embrace new ways of working together. And, this movement is yielding promising results.

... five lessons for driving large-scale social change through collaboration:


  1. Clearly define what you can do together: As Dana O'Donovan of the Monitor Institute has noted, many organizations find collaboration to be messy and time consuming. From the very beginning, you must develop clarity of purpose and articulate, "What can we do together that we could not do alone?" (...)
  2. Transcend parochialism: Even the most well intended collaboration is often crippled by parochialism. Individual organizations earmark their participation and resources for activities that perfectly align with their own work or they use the collaboration platform as a way to get other participants to fund their own priorities. (...)
  3. Adapt to data: The complex, multidisciplinary problems that many collaborative projects tackle do not have easy fixes. These challenges require continuous learning and innovation and the use of real-time data to help participants understand what is and isn't working. Adjustments must be made on the fly. (...)
  4. Feed the field: You have an obligation to share what you learn — both the results and the methods for achieving them. Living Cities has long understood the value that our member institutions get by learning and working together. (...)
  5. Support the backbone: In our experience, progress is best achieved when a "backbone organization," keeps the group's work moving forward. Staff at these organizations ensure that work is completed between meetings, track data, enable adaptation, disseminate knowledge, and build buy-in and ownership from all participants.(...)

Ben Hecht

Ben Hecht is President & CEO of Living Cities, an organization that harnesses the collective knowledge of its 22 member foundations and financial institutions to benefit low income people and the cities where they live.