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What Does Science Tell Us About Teaching Kids to Think?

What Does Science Tell Us About Teaching Kids to Think? | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
One thing seems certain: Just giving out more writing assignments won't do the trick.

Via Carolyn D Cowen
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Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 6, 2012 8:04 PM
Thank you for the rescoop!
Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, December 11, 2012 9:00 AM
Thank you Deborah and Mithuhassan for rescooping and sharing this post.
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Smart drugs: would you try them?

Smart drugs: would you try them? | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Having seen the effect drugs like Modafinil have had on my friends, I'm steering clear...
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How happiness changes with age

How happiness changes with age | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Happiness is at its highest in youth, hits rock bottom in middle age, before going up again in old age, writes neuroscientist Tali Sharot.
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BBC Two - Dara O Briain's Science Club

BBC Two - Dara O Briain's Science Club | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Dara O Briain and his team of experts take a weird and wonderful look at the brain.
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More than Words Alone Can Say: Writing with Images in the Digital Age - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - DigLN, edchat, edlearning, EdTech, literacy, photo projects, visual learning

More than Words Alone Can Say: Writing with Images in the Digital Age - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - DigLN, edchat, edlearning, EdTech, literacy, photo projects, visual learning | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Last week, on the day before Thanksgiving vacation, several of my fifth-graders voluntarily stayed after school with me to work on a project for which they would receive no grade: producing calendars based on poems and illustrations they had...
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Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again

Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Popular neuromyths about how we learn are creating confusion in the classroom, write Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons.

This post starts with a pop quiz: 

Which of these statements is false?

1. We use only 10% of our brain.

2. Environments rich in stimuli improve the brains of preschool children.

3. Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style, whether auditory, visual or kinesthetic.

It then continues to explain a number of "neuromyths" and it includes a video interview with a Pyschology professor who discusses recent findings.


Via Beth Dichter
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BBC NEWS | Programmes | Documentary Archive | Memory

BBC NEWS | Programmes | Documentary Archive | Memory | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
What is memory and how does it work? In this four part series, Pam Rutherford will explore the science of memory, its extraordinary capabilities, how and why it can go wrong.
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Persistent Paleontology - Cyborg Anthropology

Persistent paleontology is a way of describing the system of All electronically mediated subjects act in ways that are increasingly paleontological. Facebook is a system with layers of geological history. The E-mail inbox is a rapidly expanding site of excavation which one must continually query. The newness of everything buries one's ability to reach it without digging.

"Those who interact with a number is a persistent paleontologist. Everyone is now a paleontologist, always going out to E-mail, searching, digging up what one needs at the moment, and finding what got buried before.

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Welcome to Cogprints - Cogprints

Welcome to Cogprints - Cogprints | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Welcome to CogPrints, an electronic archive for self-archive papers in any area of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Linguistics, and many areas of Computer Science (e.g., artificial intelligence, robotics, vison, learning, speech, neural networks), Philosophy (e.g., mind, language, knowledge, science, logic), Biology (e.g., ethology, behavioral ecology, sociobiology, behaviour genetics, evolutionary theory), Medicine (e.g., Psychiatry, Neurology, human genetics, Imaging), Anthropology (e.g., primatology, cognitive ethnology, archeology, paleontology), as well as any other portions of the physical, social and mathematical sciences that are pertinent to the study of cognition.

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Self-Awareness with a Simple Brain: Scientific American

Self-Awareness with a Simple Brain: Scientific American | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Case studies suggest that some forms of consciousness may not require an intact cerebrum...
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On Neuroplasticity, the Extended Mind and the Intelligence Explosion

On Neuroplasticity, the Extended Mind and the Intelligence Explosion | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
This posting is a reply to this response by Daniel Estrada to my paper The Coming Social Singularity. Mr. Estrada argues that my basic position requires a strong differentiation between the technol...
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Deborah Parkin Photography: memory, immortality and the photograph

memory, immortality and the photograph

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George Ritzer

George Ritzer | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

The Internet Through a Postmodern Lens“Makers” are Better Seen as ProsumersYou, Yes You, Cause UnemploymentNo, No, Corporations are Responsible for Increasing Prosumption and Growing UnemploymentCrowdsourcing and Prosumption

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Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain

Why is Storytelling so Powerful? A Look at What it does to our Brain | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the most overused and underused techniques at the same time. In this post, we are revealing what storytelling does to our brains.

Long before we had writing as we know it there has been an oral tradition of storytelling. This post looks at the science around storytelling.

Learn about how a story "can put your whole brain to work" and why "our brains become more active when we tell stories." Find out why the brain "learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases" and much more. If you enjoy telling stories, writing stories, or listening to stories check out this post to learn more!

 


Via Beth Dichter
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Audrey's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:15 PM

Just think about all the schemas (pockets of information) we have for everything we do.  Even though we have never taken part in many activities, we could easily build plausible stories based on those schemas and even devise theories, which may be testable. This is imagination which is one example of brain power, audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk

Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, July 10, 2013 5:22 PM

Excellent!

44Doors's curator insight, March 11, 10:27 AM

"Anything you’ve experienced, you can get others to experience the same. Or at least, get their brain areas that you’ve activated that way, active too:"

 

"use simple, yet heartfelt language."

"Quick last fact: Our brain learns to ignore certain overused words and phrases that used to make stories awesome"

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Today's Neuroscience, Tomorrow's History Podcasts: Professor Uta Frith

Audio recordings, distributed in the form of podcasts, on various topics related to the History of Medicine.
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HowStuffWorks "How Your Brain Works"

HowStuffWorks "How Your Brain Works" | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Every animal you can think of -- mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, amphibians -- all have brains. But the human brain is unique. It gives us the power to think, plan, speak, imagine... Find out all about this amazing organ.
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More than Words Alone Can Say: Writing with Images in the Digital Age

More than Words Alone Can Say: Writing with Images in the Digital Age | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Last week, on the day before Thanksgiving vacation, several of my fifth-graders voluntarily stayed after school with me to work on a project for which they would receive no grade: producing calendars based on poems and illustrations they had...

 

 

 

Revisiting Visual Literacy

 

Despite more than a century of being bombarded with advertising and other media, ===> educators all too often underestimate the importance of how we communicate using images. <===

 

Read more, a MUST:

http://gettingsmart.com/cms/blog/2012/11/more-than-words-alone-can-say-writing-with-images-in-the-digital-age/

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
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Psychologists link emotion to vividness of perception and creation of vivid memories

Psychologists link emotion to vividness of perception and creation of vivid memories | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered why you can remember things from long ago as if they happened yesterday, yet sometimes can't recall what you ate for dinner last night? According to a new study led by psychologists at the University of Toronto, it's because how much something means to you actually influences how you see it as well as how vividly you can recall it later.

 

"We've discovered that we see things that are emotionally arousing with greater clarity than those that are more mundane," says Rebecca Todd, a postdoctoral fellow in U of T's Department of Psychology and lead author of the study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience. "Whether they're positive -- for example, a first kiss, the birth of a child, winning an award -- or negative, such as traumatic events, breakups, or a painful and humiliating childhood moment that we all carry with us, the effect is the same."

"What's more, we found that how vividly we perceive something in the first place predicts how vividly we will remember it later on," says Todd. "We call this 'emotionally enhanced vividness' and it is like the flash of a flashbub that illuminates an event as it's captured for memory."

 

By studying brain activity, Todd, psychology professor Adam Anderson and other colleagues at U of T, along with researchers at the University of Manchester and the University of California, San Diego found that the part of the brain responsible for tagging the emotional or motivational importance of things according to one's own past experience -- the amygdala -- is more active when looking at images that are rated as vivid. This increased activation in turn influences activity in both the visual cortex, enhancing activity linked to seeing objects, and in the posterior insula, a region that integrates sensations from the body.


Via Ashish Umre, Moin Rahman
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John Vollenbroek's curator insight, November 4, 2013 5:14 AM

Keep the stories in your organization alive !

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Doctors Use Brain Scanner To Communicate With ‘Vegetative’ Patient

Doctors Use Brain Scanner To Communicate With ‘Vegetative’ Patient | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

Contrary to what was previously thought, some people in a vegetative state may not be unaware of their surroundings. Brain scans recently showed one patient able to answer yes-or-no questions. Researchers would ask the patient questions, and then monitor a scan of his brain for a yes or no response. This technique will not only identify the small percentage of vegetative patients that are aware, but also reconnect them with their care givers and with their loved ones.

 

A vegetative state is a condition in which a person comes out of a coma, is awake, but is not aware of their surroundings, bodily sensations, is not able to follow or understand speech. Nor can they have any thoughts, emotions or memories. But while the injury prevents them from having any kind of higher brain function they are still able to exhibit basic functions such as breathing and sleeping and waking at regular times, and they can even exhibit some reflexive behaviors that might be mistaken to indicate awareness such as squeezing a person’s hand or even smiling.

 

After being in a vegetative state for more than a decade, Scott Routley, 39, communicated to doctors for the first time – through signals from a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine. Routley’s parents had previously claimed that he’d been able to communicate with them by moving his thumb or his eyes, but the medical staff hadn’t accepted those claims. Routley was involved in a study published in 2010 in which fMRI was used to assess the brain states of 54 patients with consciousness disorders. The patients were asked to perform two imagery tasks while in the MRI scanner. In one task they were instructed to imagine themselves on a tennis court hitting the ball back and forth to an instructor. For the second task they were asked to imagine themselves traveling the streets of a familiar city or the confines of their own home, visualizing all they could see along the way. Because the different natures of the two tasks – one visualized body movement, the other spatial movement – different parts of the brain were activated when each was performed. That allowed the researchers to focus their attention on two separate parts of the brain. Then they told the patients to use the different types of imagery to answer yes-or-no questions. For example, “Do you have any brothers?” would be answered “yes” with the motor imagery on the tennis court or “no” with the spatial imagery of exploring their home.

 

Of the 54 patients, only 5 were able to modulate their brain activity willfully, as far as the fRMI scans could detect. Clinical assessments of these patients showed that 3 of them showed signs of awareness. Of the remaining two that were then deemed in a vegetative state, only one could reliably answer yes or no. But that one, Scott Routley, is a game changer according to Prof. Adrian Owen, a neuroscientist at the Brain and Mind Institute at the University of Western Ontario and leader of the team caring for Routley. For one, he thinks that medical textbooks need to be rewritten. Clinical assessment of the conscious state needs to be revised so that the small percentage of people in the vegetative state who are aware can be detected. Identifying these people and communicating with them, clinicians could provide more tailored care.

 

Speaking of game changers. Imagine if someone like Scott Routley, unable to communicate with his family and close friends since his accident, could once again be able to have entire conversations. Now, fMRI is neither convenient nor cheap as a translator. But proof of principle could spur development of something more feasible, and those who have been silent for so long would finally have a voice.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Can Lifelong Learning Help As We Age?

Can Lifelong Learning Help As We Age? | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
University programs designed for older adults help prevent cognitive decline.
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Hyperlinked Memories - Cyborg Anthropology

Hyperlinked Memories - Cyborg Anthropology | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

A hyperlinked memory is a phrase used to describe the process of accessing one's memory through data stored in an external device. It is used to describe the idea of an externalized memory on a device.

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Where are all the Female Geniuses?: Scientific American

Where are all the Female Geniuses?: Scientific American | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Women tend to choose work-life balance rather than the pursuit of eminence—although the choice is not entirely freely made...
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Memory in Old Age Can Be Bolstered: Scientific American

Memory in Old Age Can Be Bolstered: Scientific American | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it
Researchers have found ways to lessen age-related forgetfulness...
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New imaging method developed at Stanford reveals stunning details of brain connections - Office of Communications & Public Affairs - Stanford University School of Medicine

New imaging method developed at Stanford reveals stunning details of brain connections - Office of Communications & Public Affairs - Stanford University School of Medicine | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

New imaging method developed at Stanford reveals stunning details of brain connections

 

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, applying a state-of-the-art imaging system to brain-tissue samples from mice, have been able to quickly and accurately locate and count the myriad connections between nerve cells in unprecedented detail, as well as to capture and catalog those connections’ surprising variety.

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On Technology, Memory and Place » Cyborgology

On Technology, Memory and Place » Cyborgology | Self Memory Nostalgia | Scoop.it

A week or two ago, Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse’s ‘Ghosts of History’ project made the rounds online. Using Photoshop, Teeuwisse has blended photographs from World War II with modern day photographs taken of the same location. The images have been reproduced at the Atlantic, the Huffington Post, The Daily Mail, and The Sun, to name a few, and similar projects have been popping at regular intervals for awhile now – here are some different examples – so there’s evidently something compelling about this kind of series.

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